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  • 51.
    Seddigh, Aram
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stress Research Institute.
    Berntson, Erik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Bodin Danielsson, Christina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stress Research Institute.
    Westerlund, Hugo
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stress Research Institute.
    Concentration requirements modify the effect of office type on indicators of health and performance2014In: Journal of Environmental Psychology, ISSN 0272-4944, E-ISSN 1522-9610, Vol. 38, p. 167-174Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper investigates the interaction between need for concentration on the job and six office types in relation to distraction, cognitive stress, emotional exhaustion, depersonalization, personal efficiency and general health. 1241 employees from five organizations participated in the study. Cell offices were associated with lower reported levels of distraction and cognitive stress, and flex offices with lower distraction, among the employees compared with all other open-plan office types. There were no significant differences in the outcome variables between different types of open-plan offices. However, there was an interaction between office type and the need for concentration for the job; employees in the high need for concentration group reported more distraction in all office types except in cell offices and also more cognitive stress in all office types except cell offices and flex offices. In conclusion, cell offices may be preferable for tasks that require higher need for concentrations.

  • 52.
    Seddigh, Aram
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stress Research Institute. Stockholm School of Economics, Sweden.
    Berntson, Erik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Jönsson, Fredrik U.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Bodin Danielsson, Christina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stress Research Institute.
    Westerlund, Hugo
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stress Research Institute.
    Effect of variation in noise absorption in open-plan office: A field study with a cross-over design2015In: Journal of Environmental Psychology, ISSN 0272-4944, E-ISSN 1522-9610, Vol. 44, p. 34-44Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Noise has repeatedly been shown to be one of the most recurrent reasons for complaints in open-plan office environments. The aim of the present study was to investigate if enhanced or worsened sound absorption in open-plan offices is reflected in the employees' ratings of disturbances, cognitive stress, and professional efficacy. Employees working on two different floors of an office building were followed as three manipulations were made in room acoustics on each of the two floors by means of less or more absorbing tiles & wall absorbents. For one of the floors, the manipulations were from better to worse to better acoustical conditions, while for the other the manipulations were worse to better to worse. The acoustical effects of these manipulations were assessed according to the new ISO-standard (ISO-3382-3, 2012) for open-plan rooms acoustics. In addition, the employees responded to questionnaires after each change. Our analyses showed that within each floor enhanced acoustical conditions were associated with lower perceived disturbances and cognitive stress. There were no effects on professional efficiency. The results furthermore suggest that even a small deterioration in acoustical room properties measured according to the new ISO-standard for open-plan office acoustics has a negative impact on self-rated health and disturbances. This study supports previous studies demonstrating the importance of acoustics in work environments and shows that the measures suggested in the new ISO-standard can be used to adequately differentiate between better and worse room acoustics in open plan offices.

  • 53.
    Seddigh, Aram
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stress Research Institute. Stockholm School of Economics, Sweden.
    Berntson, Erik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Work and organizational psychology.
    Platts, Loretta G.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stress Research Institute.
    Westerlund, Hugo
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stress Research Institute.
    Does Personality Have a Different Impact on Self-Rated Distraction, Job Satisfaction, and Job Performance in Different Office Types?2016In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 11, no 5, article id e0155295Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study investigates the joint effect of office type (cell, shared room, open-plan, and flex) and personality, measured by the Big Five personality traits, on self-rated measures of distraction, job satisfaction, and job performance (measured by professional efficacy). Regression analyses with interactions between personality and office type were conducted on 1205 participants working in 5 organizations from both the private and public sectors. While few interactions were observed in the cases of professional efficacy and job satisfaction, several were observed between personality traits and office type on the level of distraction reported. Specifically, more emotionally stable participants reported lower distraction, particularly those working in flex offices. Both agreeableness and openness to experience were associated with higher levels of distraction among participants in open-plan compared to cell offices.

  • 54.
    Seddigh, Aram
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stress Research Institute.
    Berntson, Erik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Westerlund, Hugo
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stress Research Institute.
    Does personality matter for performance in different office types?: A study of how personality and office type interact in relation to self-rated job performanceManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Office design and personality traits have both separately been show to affect indicators of job performance.  In this study we investigated the joint effect of office designs (individual office rooms, shared rooms, flex offices, and different sizes of open-plan office environments) and individual differences in personality, measured by the Big Five personality traits and stimulus screening ability, on self-rated indicators of employees’ performance. We collected data from 5 different organizations in both the private and public sectors and conducted 6 separate MANCOVAs to study the interaction effect of office type and individual differences. Our data suggest that agreeableness is the only trait that interacts with office type. People who work in medium-sized open-plan offices, large open-plan offices and flex offices report higher distraction if they score high on agreeableness. People who work in small and medium-sized open-plan offices report higher job satisfaction if they are highly agreeable. Furthermore, the results of this study indicate that except for emotional stability and stimulus screening, office type, and not individual differences, is the strongest predictor of performance. 

  • 55.
    Seddigh, Aram
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stress Research Institute.
    Bodin Danielson, Christina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stress Research Institute.
    Berntson, Erik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Westerlund, Hugo
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stress Research Institute.
    Does Need for Concentration Modify the Effect of Office Type on Health and Productivity?2014In: Book of Proceedings, 11th Conference of the European Academy of Occupational Health Psychology: Looking at the past-planning for the future: Capitalizing on OHP multidisciplinarity / [ed] N.J.A. Andreou, A. Jain, D. Hollis, J. Hassard & K. Teoh, Nottingham, UK: European Academy of Occupational Health Psychology , 2014, p. 270-271Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Studies of the impact on health and productivity of different types of office environments usually compare cell offices with open-plan offices. This paper investigates the interaction between need for concentration on the job and six more specific office types (cell office, shared-room office, small open-plan office, medium-sized open-plan office, large open-plan office and flex office) in relation to measures of health and productivity.

    A 2x6 between-subject multivariate analysis of covariance was conducted on the dependent variables distraction, cognitive stress, emotional exhaustion, depersonalization, personal efficiency and general health while controlling for age, educational level, gender and sector of the labourmarket. The independent variables were need for concentration (two categories) and office type (six categories). 1,241 employees from five organizations, both in the private and public sectors, participated in the study.

    Cell offices were associated with lower reported levels of distraction and cognitive stress, and flex offices with lower distraction, among the employees compared with all other open-plan office types. However, there were no significant differences in the outcome variables between different types of open-plan offices. There was an interaction between office type and the need for concentration for the job; employees in the high need for concentration group reported more distraction in all office types except in cell offices and also more cognitive stress in all office types except cell offices and flex offices.

    This study suggests the presence of negative health and productivity aspects in individuals working in open-plan offices. This seems especially true for those who have tasks that require a high need for concentration. In order to prevent poor health and lost of productivity, organizations working in similar office types should have an action plan in order to lower the amount of distraction and cognitive stress prevalent in open-plan offices.

  • 56.
    Seddigh, Aram
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stress Research Institute. Stockholm School of Economics, Sweden.
    Stenfors, Cecilia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Aging Research Center (ARC), (together with KI).
    Berntson, Erik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Bååth, Rasmus
    Sikström, Sverker
    Westerlund, Hugo
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stress Research Institute.
    The association between office design and performance on demanding cognitive tasks2015In: Journal of Environmental Psychology, ISSN 0272-4944, E-ISSN 1522-9610, Vol. 42, p. 172-181Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The physical office environment has been shown to be associated with indicators of both health and performance. This study focuses on how memory performance is affected in normal working conditions compared to a quiet baseline (with low amount irrelevant stimuli) in different office types, including cell offices, small open-plan offices, medium-sized open-plan offices and large open-plan offices. The results showed that the drop in performance from the quiet baseline to normal working conditions was higher in larger, compared to smaller, open-plan offices. However, contrary to our hypothesis we found that cell offices might have negative effects on performance comparable to those of large open-plan offices. These results indicate that employees in small open-plan offices, in comparison to large, have better possibilities to conduct cognitively demanding tasks and that cell offices might not be as advantageous as previously thought.

  • 57.
    Stengård, Johanna
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Bejerot, Eva
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Berntson, Erik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Chefskap, Hälsa, Effektivitet, Förutsättningar i Offentlig Sektor: Teknisk rapport från CHEFiOS projektet, Göteborgs universitet2013Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Ur förordet:

    Detta är en deskriptiv rapport från CHEFiOS-projektet. CHEFiOS står för Chefskap, Hälsa, Effektivitet, Förutsättningar i Offentlig Sektor. Projektet har finansierats av Vinnova, Västra Götalandsregionen, Göteborgs stad och Göteborgs universitet samt Previa. De kommuner som deltagit i projektet har också bidragit på många sätt, bland annat med lokala projektledare och alla chefer som ställt upp med sin tid.

    Denna rapport är en deskriptiv, teknisk rapport som syftar till att presentera enkäten och källor till de enkätfrågor som ingår i rapporten. Här redovisas också svarsfrekvenser på frågorna. Enkäten har använts till olika analyser vars resultat finns redovisat i ett flertal publikationer.

    CHEFiOS är ett forsknings- och interventionsprojekt med syfte att undersöka och förbättra förutsättningar för chefskap i offentlig sektor. Totalt har sju kommuner och 28 förvaltningar deltagit i projektet där sex förvaltningar har deltagit i interventionen och 22 har varit med som jämförelseförvaltningar. Totalt har ca 750 chefer besvarat enkäten som besvarades dels 2009, dels 2011.

  • 58.
    Stengård, Johanna
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Work and organizational psychology.
    Bernhard-Oettel, Claudia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Work and organizational psychology.
    Berntson, Erik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Work and organizational psychology.
    Leineweber, Constanze
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stress Research Institute.
    Stuck in the job: Does helplessness precede being locked-in at the workplace or vice versa? An analysis of cross-lagged effects2017In: Journal of Vocational Behavior, ISSN 0001-8791, E-ISSN 1095-9084, Vol. 102, p. 15-27Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In today's rapidly changing and increasingly competitive labour market individuals need to take control over their own career more actively. However, some employees feel that they lack psychological suppositions to get another job, even though they wish to, and as a result feel stuck in a non-preferred workplace (being locked-in). The aim of this study was to investigate how helplessness are related to being locked-in at the workplace over time, since it can be argued that helplessness precedes, is reciprocally related to, or a consequence of being locked-in at the workplace. The sample consisted of 978 Swedish employees with permanent contracts and the data were collected at two time points (2012 and 2016). Results from a cross-lagged SEM analysis showed best fit statistics for a model of reciprocal relationships over time; helplessness associated with subsequent perceptions of being locked-in at the workplace and an association, although less substantial, was found in the reversed direction from locked-in status to helplessness. Results remained unchanged when job change, reorganization, gender, age and education were controlled for, which lends further credibility to the finding. Implications for future research and theory development are outlined in the discussion.

  • 59.
    Stengård, Johanna
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Work and organizational psychology.
    Bernhard-Oettel, Claudia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Work and organizational psychology.
    Berntson, Erik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Work and organizational psychology.
    Leineweber, Constanze
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stress Research Institute.
    Aronsson, Gunnar
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Work and organizational psychology.
    Stuck in a job: Being “locked-in” or at risk of becoming locked-in at the workplace and well-being over time2016In: Work & Stress, ISSN 0267-8373, E-ISSN 1464-5335, Vol. 30, no 2, p. 152-172Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this study, being “locked-in” at the workplace is conceptualized as being in a non-preferred workplace while at the same time perceiving low employability. The aim of the study was to investigate how being locked-in or at risk of becoming locked-in (being in a non-preferred workplace yet currently satisfied, combined with perceiving low employability) relates to well-being (subjective health and depressive symptoms). The hypotheses were tested in a Swedish longitudinal sample (T1 in 2010 and T2 in 2012) of permanent employees (N = 3491). The results showed that stability with regard to locked-in-related status (being non-locked-in, at risk of becoming locked-in, or locked-in at both T1 and T2) was related to significant and stable differences in well-being. The non-locked-in status was associated with better well-being than being at risk of becoming locked-in. Moreover, those at risk of becoming locked-in showed better well-being than those with stable locked-in status. Changes towards non-locked-in were accompanied by significant improvements in well-being, and changes towards locked-in were associated with impairments in well-being. The relationships that were found could not be attributed to differences in demographic variables and occupational preference. The findings indicate that being locked-in is detrimental to well-being. This has implications for preventative interventions.

  • 60.
    Stengård, Johanna
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Bernhard-Oettel, Claudia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Näswall, Katharina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Häsänen, Lars
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Berntson, Erik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Importance of incentives and sufficient information level for displaced worker well-being and attitudes during plant closure2013In: Imagine the future world: how do we want to work tomorrow?: abstract proceedings of the 16th EAWOP Congress 2013 / [ed] G. Hertel, C. Binnewies, S. Krumm, H. Holling, & M. Kleinmann, 2013, p. 554-555Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: Downsizing and plant closures are becoming increasingly common when organizations reduce expenditure. Research has shown that large organizational changes are associated with stress and negative job satisfaction, but the consequences of plant closure on the displaced workers health and attitudes toward their employer is scarce. The study aims at investigating personal factors, such as optimism and employment history, as well as management strategies, such as information and incentives, and their influence on maintaining workers well-being and facilitating their development of new future personal and careerrelated goals. Another aim is to investigate how management strategies affect the workers attitudes toward their organization during the closure process.

    Design/Methodology: To test these hypotheses, questionnaires from 131 employees working for a Swedish plant that is closing down were collected.

    Results: Data was analysed by means of moderated hierarchical regression analysis with wellbeing, coping goal-construct, felt obligations, and withdrawals cognitions as the outcome variables. In a stepwise procedure, the impact of personal employment history, optimism, perceived employability and management strategies was analyzed. As assumed, associations between the outcome variables and management strategies (information, incentives) as well as personal factors (optimism) were found. Partly, employability acted as a moderator.

    Limitations: Cross-sectional data was used and only one plant was examined.

    Research/Practical Implications: Both information and action package could be positively influenced by management.

  • 61.
    Stengård, Johanna
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Bernhard-Oettel, Claudia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Näswall, Katharina
    University of Canterbury, New Zealand.
    Ishäll, Lars
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Berntson, Erik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Understanding the determinants of well-being and organizational attitudes during a plant closure: A Swedish case study2015In: Economic and Industrial Democracy, ISSN 0143-831X, E-ISSN 1461-7099, Vol. 36, no 4, p. 611-631Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The present study investigated to what extent perception of closure management (informational justice, severance package satisfaction) as well as individual resources and barriers (employability, tenure) were associated with well-being and organizational attitudes during plant closure. This was studied in a sample of 129 Swedish workers in a plant undergoing closure. The results showed that those who felt communication to be fair reported higher well-being and more positive attitudes. Those who were satisfied with the severance package reported lower intention to leave but also felt fewer obligations towards the organization. Those with higher employability reported higher subjective health. The results also indicated that tenure moderated the relation between informational justice and felt obligations, and employability moderated the relation between severance package satisfaction and organizational attitudes. It can be concluded that closure management together with employees’ different resources and barriers are vital for organizational attitudes and well-being during the closedown process.

  • 62.
    Stengård, Johanna
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Berntson, Erik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Leineweber, Constanze
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stress Research Institute.
    Bernhard-Oettel, Claudia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Who gets stuck in their workplaces? The role of matching factors, between individual and job, and demographics in predicting being locked-inIn: Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 63. Tengblad, Stefan
    et al.
    Berntson, Erik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Work and organizational psychology.
    Cregård, Anna
    Organisatorisk komplexitet är också en möjlighet2018In: Att leda i en komplex organisation: Utmaningar och nya perspektiv för chefer i offentlig verksamhet / [ed] Anna Cregård, Erik Berntson, Stefan Tengblad, Stockholm: Natur och kultur, 2018, p. 183-195Chapter in book (Other academic)
12 51 - 63 of 63
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