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  • 51.
    Myrberg, Nanouschka
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies. Arkeologi.
    Svears rätt och nationalismens drake.: Om en mytisk gemenskap.2006In: Meta: medeltidsarkeologisk tidskrift, ISSN 0348-7903, no 2, p. 57-68Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    The Prevalence of the Svear and the Dragon of Nationalism.

    The Swedish kingdom has changed its shape many times over the centuries. Different land areas and languages have been included or lost with the political changes. Sweden got its name from the Svear, a Germanic tribe of the central eastern Swedish area (Svealand). Why was Svealand and not any other region perceived of as the centre for the whole nation?

    Cultural and ethnic identity is created in relation to others, but also from a sense of belonging with a certain group. Ethnic belonging is primarily defined by the existence of a common myth of origin, including a common history and cosmological features. Such myths may also be used to manipulate and negotiate power. The importance of the Svear in the early state-formation rested less on economical or military powers than upon a central religious role in prehistory. This role was reactivated over the centuries by different rulers, as a means of legitimizing power through “archaization” and active use of genealogies. Through a chain of successive uses of the past over the centuries, the Svear have continued to represent the “Swedes”. This is one explanation for the name of the present kingdom, as well as for centralization to that area of state powers, which have only recently started to dissolve. Still, to understand how an ethnic community came into being is not to argue its supremacy over others; any society is responsible of how power, democracy and tolerance are applied within it.

  • 52.
    Myrberg, Nanouschka
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Medieval Studies.
    The colour of money: crusaders and coins in the thirteenth-century Baltic Sea 2010In: Making sense of things: archaeologies of sensory perception / [ed] Fredrik Fahlander & Anna Kjellström, Stockholm: Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies , 2010, 1, p. 83-102Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper investigates how colour was perceived differently in the European Middle Ages and carried significance beyond what we ascribe it today. It also considers how the various colours worked as important carriers of values and concepts in this context, where pigments were rare and expensive.

    A way to access the medieval understanding of colour is through heraldry and its colours, the tinctures, which combine hard and soft materials, even and three-dimensional surfaces, in a way that evades present-day definitions of colour. Medieval people used their senses in a cross-modal way to perceive colour and connect it to an intricate world of symbolism and values. To them, it is argued, colour was a texture just as much as a hue.

    The aim of the paper is to investigate this relationship between colour, ideas and materiality, filtered through the senses, and made manifest in a group of thirteenth-century Scandinavian coins. Were coins actually perceived as coloured?

  • 53.
    Myrberg, Nanouschka
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies.
    The Hoarded Dead: Late Iron Age silver hoards as graves2009In: Döda Personers Sällskap: Gravmaterialens identiteter och kulturella uttryck, Stockholm: Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur , 2009, 500, p. 131-145Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    As archaeologists increasingly recognise alternative ways of dealing with death and burial – in heaps of fire-cracked stones, settlement debris etc. – new inquiries and alternative explanations may be presented. This paper proposes that the hoarding of precious metals was one way of burying the dead during the Scandinavian Late Iron Age, through the inclusion of a few of the dead person’s belongings, or objects thought to be good metaphors for him or her. The contents of the hoard, as well as the act of depositing it, were considered to be essential for the correct transition of the dead person into their new status in the afterlife. Thus, as part of a social contract between the dead and the living, it was in everybody’s interest to properly “create an ancestor”.

  • 54.
    Myrberg, Nanouschka
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies. Arkeologi.
    The Imperative Way2006In: Old Norse religion in long-term perspectives: Origins, changes, and interactions. An international conference in Lund, Sweden, June 3–7, 2004, 2006, p. 45-49Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper addresses a category of archaeological remains or monuments called “field labyrinths”. These monuments are often described as “mysterious” monuments since little is known about when or why they were created, and what their inherent meaning is or was. Although they seem to have been connected to ritual, cult and superstition, older Scandinavian written sources say nothing about their existence. I will try to shed light on some of these mysteries through a discussion of certain aspects of the labyrinths, focusing on the Swedish ones made of stone.

  • 55.
    Myrberg, Nanouschka
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Medieval Studies.
    The social identity of coin hoards: An example of theory and practice in the space between numismatics and archaeology2009In: Coins in context I: New perspectives for the interpretation of coin finds / [ed] von Kaenel, H-M. & Kemmers, F., Mainz: Philipp von Zabern , 2009, p. 157-171Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Silver coin hoarding is a distinct feature of the Viking Age in some northern European areas, and these hoards convey much information about coin types and chronologies to numismatists. However, there is still no explanation of the custom itself. I argue that hoards should be considered in terms of social categories or genders as a means to understand the specific reasons behind their deposition. This contribution provides examples of this approach through contextualizing hoards and their contents.

    I also propose some theoretical premises regarding the role of numismatics in the space between archaeology, history, economic history and art history. Numismatics as a discipline must develop an explicit research agenda of its own in order to benefit equally from the numismatist's knowledge of a coin's primary context (origin), as well as secondary (use and reuse) and tertiary contexts (deposition). Coins do not belong to one single context; neither the one of primary interest to the historian, nor just that which the archaeologist encounters. A numismatic approach sensitive to all contexts opens a wealth of information in terms of the life biography of objects, social relationships, and the routines and cognitive patterns of the society which produced, used and deposited coins.

  • 56.
    Myrberg, Nanouschka
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies.
    The social identity of coin hoards: An example of theory and practice in the space between numismatics and archaeology2009In: Coins in context I: New perspectives for the interpretation of coin finds. Colloquium in Frankfurt a.M., October 25-27, 2007, Mainz: Philipp von Zabern , 2009, p. 157-171Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Silver coin hoarding is a distinct feature of the Viking Age in some northern European areas, and these hoards convey much information about coin types and chronologies to numismatists. However, there is still no explanation of the custom itself. I argue that hoards should be considered in terms of social categories or genders as a means to understand the specific reasons behind their deposition. This contribution provides examples of approach through contextualizing hoards and their contents.

    I also propose some theoretical premises regarding the role of numismatics in the space between archaeology, history, economic history and art history. Numismatics as a discipline must develop an explicit research agenda of its own in order to benefit equally from the numismatist’s knowledge of a coin’s primary context (origin), as well as secondary (use and reuse) and tertiary contexts (deposition). Coins do not belong to one single context; neither the one of primary interest to the historian, nor just that which the archaeologist encounters. A numismatic approach sensitive to all contexts opens a wealth of information in terms of the life biography of objects, social relationships, and the routines and cognitive patterns of the society which produced, used and deposited coins.

  • 57.
    Myrberg, Nanouschka
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies. Arkeologi.
    Två nya C-uppsatser med numismatisk inriktning2004In: Svensk Numismatisk Tidskrift, ISSN 0283-071X, no 3, p. 72-Article, book review (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 58.
    Myrberg, Nanouschka
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Medieval Studies.
    Kemmers, Fleur
    JW Goethe-Universität Frankfurt am Main.
    Re-thinking numismatics: The archaeology of coins2011In: Archaeological Dialogues, ISSN 1380-2038, E-ISSN 1478-2294, no 2, p. 87-108Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper sets out to re-member coins into archaeological discourse. It is argued that coins, as part of material culture, need to be examined within the theoretical framework of historical archaeology and material-culture studies. Through several case studies we demonstrate how coins, through their integration of text, image and existence as material objects, offer profound insights not only into matters of economy and the ‘big history’ of issuers and state organization but also into ‘small histories’, cultural values and the agency of humans and objects. In the formative period of archaeology in the 19th century the study of coins played an important role in the development of new methods and concepts. Today, numismatics is viewed as a field apart. The mutual benefits of our approach to the fields of archaeology and numismatics highlight the need for a new and constructive dialogue between the disciplines.

12 51 - 58 of 58
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