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  • 51.
    Jennische, Ulrik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Small-Small: Moral Economy and the Marketspace in Northern Ghana2018Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Over the past decade, the Ghanaian government has tried to include and accommodate the many people working in the so-called informal economy. This formalization process is in line with a global market-driven development discourse. The small-scale traders selling their goods from marketplaces and along the streets in major cities have been of particular interest.

    While the Ghanaian government defines these actors as working in an “informal sector” and thus beyond the formal political and economic system, it simultaneously targets them with welfare services and various policies with the purpose of including them in the creation of a modern welfare state and shaping them into moral and entrepreneurial citizens.

    In Tamale in northern Ghana, years of political neglect, violence, and structural adjustment have led to small-scale traders taking over streets, sidewalks, and infrastructure, which has created a boundless and dynamic marketspace that far exceeds the delimited and politically defined marketplaces. For the state, therefore, much of the formalization process is about restoring the control and power of public space through evictions and relocations of traders. In conjunction with the inclusive welfare services, this demonstrates the contradictions entailed in the politics of informality.

    The study is based on an ethnographic fieldwork among small-scale traders in northern Ghana with a specific interest in the events that occur at the intersection where state, market, and citizenship meet. By asking what it means to be a trader in this contradictory process of formalization, the dissertation aims to understand this transformative moment in Ghana’s political and economic history.

    In this study the emic notion of small-small is used to frame the norms of gradual progress and letting others in that define the moral economy of small-scale trade. Norms, values, and obligations generate trust and solidarity within the marketspace. But more than that, small-small produces a form of politics against an obstructive and unreliable state and it guides traders into the future by shaping dreams, aspirations, and possibilities. Situated in traders’ daily lives, work, and relationships, and through the small-small lens, this thesis investigates the underlying moralities of formalization. It describes the politics of the Ghanaian state, which in its attempt to create an inclusive welfare society, struggles to both protect the moral dynamics of small-scale trade while adhering to the norms and standards of an open liberalized economy.

  • 52.
    Galli, Raoul
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Sociala fält2018In: Nyckelbegrepp i socialantropologin / [ed] Raoul Galli, Stockholm: Socialantropologiska institutionen, Stockholms universitet , 2018, 3 uppl, p. 37-39Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    För att förklara detta teoretiska begrepp behöver först en distinktion göras mellan olika ”fält” i vetenskapliga fackterminologier: där finns fältbegrepp som avser empiriska studier och metoder karaktäristiska för särskilda discipliner, t.ex. biologernas fältstudier och antropologins →fältarbete; där finns också de akademiskt vardagliga användningarna av fältordet, som när antropologer, etnologer och andra talar om ”mitt fält” eller forskare i gemen och vetenskapsjournalister talar om ”forskningsfält” av allehanda slag; och där finns de specifikt teoretiska fältbegreppen. Fältteorier hittar vi inom exempelvis fysikens undersökningar av elektricitet, magnetism och gravitation; inom matematikens geometri och algebra; och inom samhällsvetenskaperna, där särskilt psykologin (socialpsykologin), sociologin och antropologin genererat fältteorier.

  • 53.
    Khosravi, Shahram
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Stolen time2018In: Radical philosophy, ISSN 0300-211X, no 203, p. 38-41Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 54.
    Lindquist, Johan
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Xiang, Biao
    The Infrastructural Turn in Asian Migration2018In: Routledge Handbook of Asian Migrations / [ed] Gracia Liu-Farrer, Brenda S.A. Yeo, Routledge, 2018, p. 152-161Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 55.
    Mitchell, Andrew
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Tracing Wolves: Materiality, Effect and Difference2018Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    As wolves are seldom seen in Scandinavia, Tracing Wolves utilises the ‘trace’ as both a theoretical and methodological tool to aid comprehension of what a wolf is and what a wolf does. Consequently, this enquiry examines human-wolf practices, such as tracking, genetic analysis, GPS tracking, hunting, and wolf necropsies, via which Scandinavian wolves in Sweden manifest. It is in this respect, through the traces wolves leave – like tracks in the snow, a steaming scat, the remains of a recent kill, GPS data or genetic material – that humans come to know wolves. Furthermore, this study also employs the ‘trace’ as a way to navigate through the complexities of material-semiotics and post-human approaches to method and theory, and contemplates rather more traditional approaches to anthropological knowledge. Accordingly, by considering the materiality of human-wolf encounters and how effects are comprehended and differences emerge, this analysis highlights that some of theses practices, aided by empathy and embodiment, facilitate a sociality that operates across species boundaries.

  • 56.
    Helgesson, Stefan
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Mörte Alling, AnnikaLindqvist, YvonneStockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Institute for Interpreting and Translation Studies.Wulff, HelenaStockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    World Literatures: Exploring the Cosmopolitan-Vernacular Exchange2018Collection (editor) (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Placing itself within the burgeoning field of world literary studies, the organising principle of this book is that of an open-ended dynamic, namely the cosmopolitan-vernacular exchange.

    As an adaptable comparative fulcrum for literary studies, the notion of the cosmopolitan-vernacular exchange accommodates also highly localised literatures. In this way, it redresses what has repeatedly been identified as a weakness of the world literature paradigm, namely the one-sided focus on literature that accumulates global prestige or makes it on the Euro-American book market.

    How has the vernacular been defined historically? How is it inflected by gender? How are the poles of the vernacular and the cosmopolitan distributed spatially or stylistically in literary narratives? How are cosmopolitan domains of literature incorporated in local literary communities? What are the effects of translation on the encoding of vernacular and cosmopolitan values?

    Ranging across a dozen languages and literature from five continents, these are some of the questions that the contributions attempt to address.

  • 57.
    Leivestad Høyer, Hege
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Anna Gavanas, Pensionärsplaneten: Spaniensvenskar och pensionsmigration i en globaliserad värld, Göteborg: Makadam Förlag, 20162017In: Sociologisk forskning, ISSN 0038-0342, Vol. 54, no 3Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 58.
    Høyer Leivestad, Hege
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Beyond Informality: Intimacy and Commerce at the Caravanning Trade Fair2017In: Ethnographies of Conferences and Trade Fairs: Shaping Industries, Creating Professionals / [ed] Hege Høyer Leivestad, Anette Nyqvist, Cham, Switzerland: Palgrave Macmillan, 2017, p. 129-145Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the geographical peripheries of European cities, trade fairs gather thousands of caravan- and motorhome enthusiasts every year; chasing the latest news from the so-called “mobile living” industry. These trade fairs are also spectacular social events, sporting temporary trade fair campsites, as well as a wide range of entertainment and activities. This chapter asks how we can understand the caravanning trade fair as a market space that challenges the dichotomy between the formal and informal economy. By ethnographically approaching a specific Swedish trade fair, Elmia Caravan and Motorhome, Leivestad looks at how the fair becomes a sphere where the selling of dwellings take place through a continuous reproduction of “like-mindedness” in an environment characterized by close connections between retailers, manufacturers and customers.

  • 59.
    Lindquist, Johan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Brokers, channels, infrastructure: moving migrant labor in the Indonesian-Malaysian oil palm complex2017In: Mobilities, ISSN 1745-0101, E-ISSN 1745-011X, Vol. 12, no 2, p. 213-226Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article problematizes the dichotomy between fluid mobility and fixed infrastructure through a case study of migrant labor recruitment from Indonesia to the Malaysian oil palm industry. Channels of low-skilled transnational migration must be understood in relation to other forms of mobility, most notably that of brokers, who move along adjacent and overlapping routes. Broker mobility is not only shaped by relatively immobile moorings, but also by more fluid moorings', notably mobile communication, low-cost airlines, and emergent social relationships. In order to understand how the migration process is arranged it is critical to pay attention to the logistical practices that make mobility possible. The article argues that broker mobility, diverse forms of moorings, and logistics come to shape a socio-technical system that can be understood in terms migration infrastructure.

  • 60.
    Leivestad Høyer, Hege
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Campsite Migrants: British Caravanners and Homemaking in Benidorm2017In: Nordic Journal of Migration Research, ISSN 1799-649X, E-ISSN 1799-649X, Vol. 7, no 3, p. 181-188Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Based on ethnographic fieldwork amongst British migrants on a Spanish Camping and caravan site, this article argues that the home is a productive entrance point for understanding the dynamics of this form of migration. Whilst campsites are planned and legally regulated as leisure spheres for mobile camping, touring caravans provide an affordable option for migrants otherwise excluded from the Spanish property market. In this article, I show how economic activities are centred on the caravan homemaking wherein mobile dwellings are transformed into - and used as - immobile living units. The making of the caravan home is furthermore central to the shaping and maintenance of social networks of support that are based on ‘handyman’ manual labour and a cash economy.

  • 61.
    Maček, Ivana
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Communicating the Unthinkable: A Psychodynamic Perspective2017In: Memory and Genocide: On What Remains and the Possibility of Representation / [ed] Fazil Moradi, Ralph Buchenhorst, Maria Six-Hohenbalken, Routledge, 2017, p. 107-121Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Experiences of genocide have often an emotionally and intellectually evasive quality which makes them difficult, and sometimes impossible, to share with others. Analyzing documentary films and academic teaching, through psychodynamic concepts of containment, trauma, and memory, two qualitatively different ways of communicating the experience of genocide are found: embodied representation and contained representation. While the first communicates the traumatic or unthinkable content of genocide, the second communicates the non-traumatic or thinkable. The author proposes that any student and scholar of needs to move between the grey opacity of genocide experience, and the clear understanding of embodied and contained representation.

  • 62.
    Backman, Aina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Courtroom atmospheres: Affective dynamics in court sessions of criminal matter in Vienna2017Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis examines the composition of affective atmospheres, emerging in court sessions of criminal matter in Vienna. The notion of atmosphere is used to explore collective affective qualities, emerging through the interplay between affective bodies and their environment. The focus provides as analytical frame for bringing forward the workings of affect in legal procedures. From a starting point in theories of affect and atmosphere, I cast light at how the affectively charged space is both monitored and beyond control. First, I trace affect through the lens of spatial arrangements of courtrooms. I show how the architectural and interior arrangements and aesthetics of courtrooms are expedient in creating resonance between the bodies and control over the situations, while being visual and material representations of law. Second, I trace affect in the relation between the bodies that produce atmosphere and regard for the bodily capacity to affect and be affected. I consider principles of criminal procedure structuring and disciplining affective bodies in courtrooms and the juridical labour entailing work on emotions. Third, I trace affect in the dynamics and changes of affective atmosphere by showing how atmospheric changes come about and are contested through intensification and ruptures in atmosphere. I discuss the compositions of affective atmosphere in relation to discipline and control converging with bodies entering the legal setting. The ethnographic material is collected through participant observation in one hundred court sessions, as well as through interviews with people involved. 

  • 63.
    Rodineliussen, Rasmus
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Divers Engaging Policy—Practices of Making Water2017Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    In this thesis I discuss how divers in Rio de Janeiro and Arraial do Cabo, Brazil, are part of a process of making water (Barnes 2014). This I do by examining the relationship between the policies of the non-governmental organization Project Aware and these divers. These policies under question concerns the growing issue of marine debris, asking divers to directly act towards a solution by removing debris, and inform about the issue. I employ the concepts habitus and the entrepreneurial self as heuristic think-tools in order to illuminate the structuring aspect of this relationship, how it affects the way policies are negotiated, embodied, and practiced in regard to society and the environment (e.g. Bourdieu 1990; Rose 1998; Gershon 2016). My argument is based on observations, interviews, and media analysis. I show how my interlocutors are engaged in making water, in hands on actions of removing debris, and in discourse making where the issue is forwarded, emphasized, and discussed. Further I illustrate the impact that local power structures hold on practices of agents (Barnes 2014; Karlsson 2015).

  • 64.
    Hentati, Jannete
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    En lektion i gemenskap: Ordning och (o)reda bland lärare i Malmö och Marseille2017Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This ethnographic study is based on comparative fieldwork among teachers at secondary schools in two southern situated cities in Europe: Malmö in Sweden and Marseille in France. The focus of the study is on how teachers make sense of and grapple with their mission to build and foster “good” citizens, which is intended to promote national community and unity. Exploring how the teachers strive and struggle to fulfil this mission provides a better insight into the ideas and practices that permeate their work. At the same time, the everyday tensions that occasionally complicate this task are highlighted. A crucial observation in this study is that teachers in both Sweden and France often find themselves confined to a kind of cross-pressure. Enclosed within it, teachers are torn between, on the one hand, endeavouring to reach certain visions and goals regarding how to instil a sense of national community in their pupils and, on the other, being confronted with an irregular and often far from pliable reality. This study shows how teachers are dealing with this cross-pressure, how – in case of hurdles and friction in their work – they try to maintain order in what they perceive and experience as being a state of great disorder in relation to their educational mission. The thesis contributes to increased knowledge of teachers’ lived professional experiences and situated practices in their day-to-day work. It also brings to light a problematising discussion about the role and importance that teachers expect themselves to play in relation to an overall idea of national community and unity in Sweden and France respectively.

  • 65.
    Høyer Leivestad, Hege
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Nyqvist, AnetteStockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Ethnographies of Conferences and Trade Fairs: Shaping Industries, Creating Professionals2017Collection (editor) (Refereed)
  • 66.
    Galli, Raoul
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Förord 20172017In: Nyckelbegrepp i socialantropologin / [ed] Raoul Galli, Stockholm: Socialantropologiska institutionen, Stockholms universitet , 2017, 2 uppl, p. 3-4Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    En grundtanke bakom föreliggande uppdatering av ”Nyckelbegrepp” är att fortsättningsvis se det som ett dokument under kontinuerlig utveckling. Ytterligare uppdaterade utgåvor kommer att publiceras i anslutning till nya läsår och terminer vid Stockholms universitet. De sjutton nya och reviderade nyckelbegrepp som publiceras i och med denna, 2017 års upplaga, smyger sig in bland den majoritet begrepp som finns kvar i texten från 1983. Vissa begreppsartiklar författade i 1980-talets början är omisskännligt daterade. Mycket har hänt sedan dess inom antropologin, samhällsvetenskapen och inte minst den omgivande värld som vi har i uppgift att söka förstå och förklara. En del av dessa begreppsartiklar kommer att ersättas av uppdaterade texter. Andra kommer att stå kvar enligt principen att hellre än att gallras ut finnas tillgängliga i studentpedagogiskt syfte eftersom de har ett uppenbart begrepps- och ämneshistoriskt värde.

  • 67.
    Wulff, Helena
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Global spridning för lokala teman: Crime Fiction as World Literature, Louise Nilsson, David Damrosch & Theo D'haen (red.)2017In: Respons : recensionstidskrift för humaniora & samhällsvetenskap, ISSN 2001-2292, no 6, p. 66-68Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 68.
    Nyqvist, Anette
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Gold: Kenya-India2017Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 69.
    Wulff, Helena
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Greater Than Its Size: Ireland in Literature and Life2017In: Small Countries: Structures and Sensibilities / [ed] Ulf Hannerz, Andre Gingrich, Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 2017, p. 301-316Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 70.
    Galli, Raoul
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Habitus2017In: Nyckelbegrepp i socialantropologin / [ed] Raoul Galli, Stockholm: Socialantropologiska institutionen, Stockholms universitet , 2017, 2 uppl, p. 17-18Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    HABITUS (latin, ”vana” och ”utseende”; etymologiskt härlett från habere: att ha, hålla, äga). Begreppet habitus tillämpas inom flera vetenskapliga discipliner (botanik, medicin, zoologi) och definieras som samhällsveten-skapligt begrepp kort som: system av varaktiga och överförbara dispositioner att varsebli, värdera och handla. Genom att betona praktisk kunskap –praktik – i form av invanda och förkroppsligade handlingsmönster, utgör habitusbegreppet ett alternativ till handlingsteorier grundade på människors (i huvudsak) medvetna, intentionella och målrationella handlande (se →agens; →aktör; →interaktion).

  • 71.
    Høyer Leivestad, Hege
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Anette, Nyqvist
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Tunestad, Hans
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Individuals and Industries: Large-Scale Professional Gatherings as Ethnographic Fields2017In: Ethnographies of Conferences and Trade Fairs: Shaping Industries, Creating Professionals / [ed] Hege Høyer Leivestad, Anette Nyqvist, Cham: Palgrave Macmillan, 2017, p. 1-21Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Conferences and trade fairs have during the past decades become a significant global industry in and of itself. Here the authors of this volume claim that such large-scale professional gatherings have become key sites for the making and negotiation of both industries and professions. The anthology is an attempt to make sense of conferences and trade fairs as phenomena in contemporary society. Large-scale professional gatherings are here understood as organized and particular events, bound by place and time, where a large number of professionals within defined industries assemble to network and to exchange information.

  • 72.
    Leivestad Høyer, Hege
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Inventorying mobility: methodology on wheels2017In: Methodologies of mobility: ethnography and experiment / [ed] Alice Elliot, Roger Norum, Noel B. Salazar, Oxford: Berghahn Books, 2017, p. 47-67Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 73.
    Maček, Ivana
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    “It starts to burn a little”: Intergenerational Transmission of Experiences of War within a Bosnian Family in Sweden2017In: Oral History Forum, ISSN 1482-5872, no 37Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study builds on recent findings that emotions are crucial to the transmission of experiences of mass political violence between generations. In such work, the familial setting, as distinct from the individual psychological domain or collective sociocultural contexts, has been receiving increasing scholarly attention. Drawing on a larger project on the families formed by Bosnians who moved to Sweden during the 1990s war, this article develops a new method to analyze the interfamilial dynamics of communicating meanings. This method combines analysis of the emotions with which participants characterize certain facts – whether in semi-structured interviews or in children’s drawings – with the dynamic reflexivity common to both participant observation and psychotherapy. The analysis demonstrates how certain facts and feelings may be transmitted unchanged, while others become transformed or are lost in the process of intergenerational transmission.

  • 74.
    Escobar López, Daniel
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    "Las mujeres despiertas”: el papel del género en el control de un terreno comunal en los Andes peruanos2017In: Revista de Antropología Social, ISSN 1131-558X, Vol. 26, no 2, p. 307-332Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article aims to explore the role of gender relations in the control and use of communal land in a peasant village located in the Peruvian Andes. The context is the current process of acquiring land private deeds, which even though began several years ago, in the region, has been speeded-upby the current plans to build an international airport closed to the village. We will discuss how the emergence of a tourist attraction (El Mirador) and the consequent formation of a female handicraf tassociation has affected the gender configurations of the village and helped to raise women’s political participation.

  • 75.
    Wulff, Helena
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Manhattan as a Magnet: Place and Circulation among young Swedes2017In: America observed: On an International Anthropology of the United States / [ed] Virginia R. Dominguez, Jasmin Habib, New York: Berghahn Books, 2017, p. 31-50Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 76. Lin, Weiqiang
    et al.
    Lindquist, Johan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Xiang, Biao
    Yeoh, Brenda S. A.
    Migration infrastructures and the production of migrant mobilities2017In: Mobilities, ISSN 1745-0101, E-ISSN 1745-011X, Vol. 12, no 2, p. 167-174Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Since the proclamation of a mobility turn in the 2000s, scholars have populated the field with invaluable insights on what it means to move, and what the politics of movement are. One particularly useful thread revolves around the issue of infrastructures, which have generally been taken to mean the manifest forms of moorings and fixities that help order and give shape to mobilities. Yet, while significant inroads have been made in delineating the morphologies of transport infrastructures, mobilities research has been relatively reticent about the organisational structures, orders and arrangements that give rise to another key mobile phenomenon of our time international migration. In this editorial introduction, we lay down some groundwork on the productive and political nature of infrastructures that likewise affect and inform the way (im)mobilities are contingently created and parsed in migration. Looking through the prism of East and Southeast Asia and its migration infrastructures, we take advantage of the new' infrastructural configurations in an emerging empirical context to point to some directions by which mobilities researchers can more rigorously interrogate migration' as another socially meaningful and specific form of mobility that exceeds a mere displacement of people or change in national domicile.

  • 77.
    Karlsson, Bengt G.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Märkligt tyst om kärnvapnens ´fredliga´näringskedja2017In: Dagens arena, no 11 novemberArticle in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [sv]

    »Diskussionen om kärnvapen förbiser ofta helt den nukleära kedjan, den infrastruktur som ytterst möjliggör dessa vapens framställning.«, Bengt G. Karlsson, professor i socialantropologi vid Stockholms universitet gör här en resa i det nukleära västerländska landskapet, där strålningen från kärnkraftshaveriet i Tjernobyl  från 1986 förrädiskt göms i idyllisk natur.

  • 78.
    Björnsson, Malin
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Special Education.
    Hellström, Lena
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Special Education.
    Möjligheter och utmaningar med läsförståelsetest: speciallärares upplevelser av screening2017Independent thesis Advanced level (professional degree), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 79.
    Olsson, Erik
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    O´Reilly, Karen
    Loughborough University, UK.
    North-Europeans in Spain: Practices of community in the context of migration, mobility and transnationalism2017In: Nordic Journal of Migration Research, ISSN 1799-649X, E-ISSN 1799-649X, Vol. 7, no 3, p. 133-138Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The focus of this special issue is the migration of North-Europeans to the Spanish coastal areas which are known to be tourist destinations. This is a kind of mobility that most commonly has been conceptualised as Lifestyle Migration (cf. Benson & O’Reilly 2009a, 2009b). The concept of lifestyle migration has been developed and widely employed as a way of thinking about mainly relatively affluent and relatively privileged forms of migration around the world. The authors of this special issue are moving away from the view of Lifestyle Migrants as a distinct category of migrant, and away from an emphasis on fluid migration forms in the context of privilege. Here, instead we focus on the human-being-ness of all migrations, the ubiquitous search for community and belonging, and the work of inhabitance (Ahmed et al 2003: 1). We also draw attention to the new structures or sedimented forms of social life that emerge from this work of inhabitance. And we also draw attention to the lack of actual privilege for some of these supposedly privileged migrants. In this special issue, we explore the processes of settlement, belonging and home-making for Lifestyle Migrants that are evident in all migration trends (Walsh & Näre 2016). We wish to emphasise that, although Lifestyle Migrants have tended to be treated as a specific type or category of migrant, they are indeed migrants, just as refugees, asylum seekers, labour migrants, and returnee migrants are migrants. Similar processes are at play here even though theconditions of migration might differ. The people who moved to the coastal areas of southern Spain as permanent residents, seasonal visitors and long-stayers are as much mobile human beings as a category of Lifestyle Migrants. So, in this special issue, rather than focus on what is unique about Lifestyle Migration, we examine in depth the social life, the community makings and the everyday realities of British and Swedish lifestyle migrants as examples of global and diverse migrations. We hope the debates and empirical evidence presented here will thus contribute to a richer understanding of the processes of migration in the context of diverse conditions. Further, having been often subjected to an emphasis on fluidity, mobility, and flux (e.g., Cohen 2015), the papers in this special issue draw more attention than previously to the sedimented practices and outcomes of these migrations. The work that the migrants put into community, belonging, routines, patterns, and means of coping and living in everyday life leads to new forms of community, new ways of living, and new sedimented practices that, in turn, shape future lives and practices (cf. O’Reilly 2012).

  • 80.
    Tina, Vikor
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Not for me: Exclusion and self-exclusion from democracy2017Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Disinterest and feelings of alienation from politics keep many citizens away from active participation in the democratic process. Based on interviews with inhabitants in Skogås, a suburb of Stockholm, Sweden, and on participant observation at local meeting places, this thesis explores various aspects that shape people’s willingness and ability to exert power in the democratic political system, and identifies the political culture as well as personal encounters with fellow inhabitants and political representatives as two key factors. The study presents the perspectives of various inhabitants - teenagers, single moms, senior citizens, local leaders of associations and other locals with different backgrounds and lifestyles - as well as places and practices that foster political interest, know-how and solidarity, such as a tenants union and a dog park started by local dog-owners. Because politics is often studied through influential and organized agents such as activist groups and public officials, this study intends to offer an alternative approach by examining politics from the point of view of ‘ordinary citizens’ and their immediate vicinity.

  • 81.
    Galli, Raoul
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Hannerz, Ulf (Creator)
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Nyckelbegrepp i socialantropologin2017Collection (editor) (Other academic)
  • 82.
    Lindh, Kristofer
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Performance at the Edge of Apocalypse: An ethnographic study of collective identity construction in a neo-nationalist social movement in Sweden2017Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    In several countries of the Global North, right-wing parties are successfully mobilizing public support, influencing political debates and introducing arguments and rhetorics that draw on xenophobia, populism and ethnocentrism, ostensibly with a purpose to amplify the “national order of things” (Malkki 1992). This thesis addresses this development by providing an ethnography, based fieldwork, of the Swedish social movement Folkets Demonstration, which arranges anti-government manifestations on squares most usually in Stockholm. Drawing on classical theories on performance by Victor Turner and Erving Goffman, I investigate how the demonstrations of the movement facilitate the construction of a collective identity of “the people”, which also includes exploring the world view of the demonstrators.

    As I argue, through the socio-emotionality of the demonstrations, the movement conducts a cultural performance of national cohesion vis-à-vis the Swedish national community, cosmologically perceived as on the edge of an apocalypse due to immigration and the alleged cosmopolitanist agenda of the government. In addition, I argue that the demonstrations can be understood as strategically managed towards idealized performances of democracy. Hence, the demonstrations can be considered regressive-utopian performances of a national-democratic community, furthermore embedded in a polarization between “the people” and “the elite” and through which the collective identity of “the people” is constructed.

  • 83.
    Birnudóttir Sigurðardóttir, Júlía
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Practicing creativity: Landscape architects make future Stockholm2017Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Green urban spaces are a vigorous part in cities development, all over the world (Swanwick, Dunnet, & Wooley, 2003). These spaces are persistently constructed and negotiated over a creative process, which includes a network of actors, such as clients, designers, constructors, and users. This thesis addresses this process - with a case study of landscape architects in Stockholm, and their practice of creativity. The landscape architects present one group of actors involved in the process, where they design urban spaces for the future through their creative work. It begins with a mental image, an idea, and ends with a built site, a designed space.

    In reference to practice theory (Ortner, 1984 and 2006) and the biosocial becomings approach (Ingold, 2013), I analyze how creativity as a practice is socially produced by history, culture and power, through the biosocial growth of the creative agent, the landscape architect. Referring to Hallam and Ingold ́s definition (2007, p. 3), I understand creative practice as an improvisational process. I argue that creativity is accumulated, i.e. a becoming practice amongst becoming creative agents. While investigating the practice of creativity through a traditional participant observation, I primarily focus on sounds, where I listen to the practice, and use it as a method of collecting empirical data. With that method, I enrich the registration of sensor impressions (Borneman & Hammoudi, 2009, p. 19) during my fieldwork, providing a sonic dimension to the knowledge of creative practice amongst landscape architects. 

  • 84.
    Khosravi, Shahram
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Precarious lives: waiting and hope in Iran2017Book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In Precarious Lives, Shahram Khosravi attempts to reconcile the paradoxes of Iranians' everyday life in the first decade of the twenty-first century. On the one hand, multiple circumstances of precarity give rise to a sense of hopelessness, shared visions of a futureless tomorrow, widespread home(land)lessness, intense individualism, and a growth of incivilities. On the other, daydreaming and hope, as well as civility and solidarity in political protests, street carnivals, and social movements, continue to persist. Young Iranians describe themselves as being stuck in purposelessness and forced to endure endless waiting, and they are also aware that they are perceived as unproductive and a burden on their society. Despite the aspirations and inspiration they possess, they find themselves forced into petrifying social and spatial immobility. Uncertainty in the present, a seemingly futureless tomorrow: these are the circumstances that Khosravi explores in Precarious Lives.

    Creating an intricate and moving portrait of contemporary Iranian life, Khosravi weaves together individual stories, government reports, statistics, and cultural analysis of art and literature to depict how Iranians react to the experience of precarity and the possibility of hope. Drawing on extensive ethnographic engagement with youth in Tehran and Isfahan as well as with migrant workers in rural areas, Khosravi examines the complexities and contradictions of everyday life in Iran. Precarious Lives is a vital work of contemporary anthropology that serves as a testament to the shared hardship and hope of the Iranian people.

  • 85.
    Wulff, Helena
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Rhythms of Writing: An Anthropology of Irish Literature2017Book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This is the first antrhopological study of writers, writing and conteporary literary culture. Drawing on the flourishing literary scene in Ireland as a basis, Helena Wulff explores the social world of contemporary irish writers, examining fiction, novels, shorts stories as well as journalism. 

    The making of a writer's career is built on the "rhythms of writing": long hours of writing in solitude alternate with public events such as book readings and media appearances.  

  • 86.
    Nyqvist, Anette
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Scheduled schmoozing: Notes on interludal practices at responsible investors' conferences2017In: Ethnographies of conferences and trade fairs: Shaping industries, creating professionals / [ed] Hege Høyer Leivestad, Anette Nyqvist, Palgrave Macmillan, 2017, 1, p. 23-42Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 87.
    Karlsson, Bengt G.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Shillong: tribal urbanity in the Northeast Indian borderland2017In: IIAS newsletter / International Institute for Asian Studies, ISSN 0929-8738, Vol. 77, p. 32-33Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In this short essay, I will try to outline a few key traits or characteristics of present-day Shillong, a city I have come to love and feel at home in.

  • 88.
    Garsten, Christina
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology. Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Centre for Organizational Research (SCORE).
    Sörbom, Adrienne
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Centre for Organizational Research (SCORE).
    Small Places, Big Stakes: Meetings as Moments of Ethnographic Momentum2017In: Meeting Ethnography: Meetings as Key Technologies of Contemporary Governance, Development, and Resistance / [ed] Jen Sandler, Renita Thedvall, New York: Routledge, 2017, p. 126-142Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 89.
    Behtoui, Alireza
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Boréus, Kristina
    Neergaard, Anders
    Yazdanpanah, Soheyla
    Speaking up, leaving or keeping silent: racialized employees in the Swedish elderly care sector2017In: Work, Employment and Society, ISSN 0950-0170, E-ISSN 1469-8722, Vol. 31, no 6, p. 954-971Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    When encountering problems and dissatisfaction in the workplace, employees may choose between three strategies: voice; exit; or silence. Using survey data and interview material from a study of employees in an elderly care organization in Sweden, this article investigates the workers' perceptions of the eligibility and prospects of these strategies and which individual characteristics and situational factors might affect them. The focus is on racialized workers (operationalized through their region of birth) who, according to earlier studies, are less likely than other employees to choose voice behaviour. Contrary to some earlier studies, the results here attribute such a propensity to the importance of power differences across racial hierarchies' rather than to differences in cultural values. Individuals in this (racialized) category have a lower occupational status, earn less and experience less favourable relationships with their managers.

  • 90.
    Enqvist, Johan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Stewardship in an urban world: Civic engagement and human–nature relations in the Anthropocene2017Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Never before have humans wielded a greater ability to alter and disrupt planetary processes. Our impact is becoming so noticeable that a new geological epoch has been proposed – the Anthropocene – in which Earth systems might no longer maintain the stable and predictable conditions of the past 12 millennia. This is particularly evident in the rapid expansion of urban areas, where a majority of humans now live and where environmental changes such as rising temperatures and habitat loss are happening faster than elsewhere.  In light of this, questions have been raised about what a more responsible relationship between humans and the rest of the planet might look like. Scholars in sustainability science employ the concept of ‘stewardship’ in searching for an answer; however, with multiple different applications and definitions, there is a need to better understand what stewardship is or what novelty it might add to sustainability research. This thesis investigates stewardship empirically through two case studies of civic engagement for protecting nature in cities – Bengaluru, India and New York City, USA. Further, the thesis also proposes a conceptual framework for how to understand stewardship as a relation between humans and the rest of nature, based on three dimensions: care, knowledge and agency. This investigation into stewardship in the urban context uses a social–ecological systems approach to guide the use of mixed theory and methods from social and natural sciences. The thesis is organized in five papers. Paper I reviews defining challenges in managing urban social–ecological systems and proposes that these can more effectively be addressed by collaborative networks where public, civic, other actors contribute unique skills and abilities. Paper II and Paper III study water resource governance in Bengaluru, a city that has become dependent on external sources while its own water bodies become degraded and depleted.Paper II analyzes how locally based ‘lake groups’ are able to affect change through co-management arrangements, reversing decades of centralization and neglect of lakes’ role in Bengaluru’s water supply.Paper III uses social–ecological network analysis to analyze how patterns in lake groups’ engagements and collaborations show better fit with ecological connectivity of lakes.Paper IV employs sense of place methods to explore how personal bonds to a site shapes motivation and goals in waterfront stewardship in New York City. Finally,Paper V reviews literature on stewardship and proposes a conceptual framework to understand and relate different uses and underlying epistemological approaches in the field. In summary, this thesis presents an empirically grounded contribution to how stewardship can be understood as a human–nature relation emergent from a deep sense ofcare and responsibility, knowledge and learning about how to understand social–ecological dynamics, and theagency and skills needed to influence these dynamics in a way that benefits a greater community of humans as others. Here, the care dimension is particularly important as an underappreciated aspect of social–ecological relations, and asset for addressing spatial and temporal misalignment between management institutions and ecosystem. This thesis shows that care for nature does not erode just because green spaces are degraded by human activities – which may be crucial for promoting stewardship in the Anthropocene.

  • 91.
    Mengiste, Tekalign Ayalew
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Struggle for Mobility: Risk, hope and community of knowledge in Eritrean and Ethiopian migration pathways towards Sweden2017Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    On the basis of the ethnographic fieldwork conducted in Sweden, Italy, Sudan and Ethiopia during 2013–2015, this study examines the motivations, organizations and impact of overland migratory journeys from Ethiopia and Eritrea across the Sahara Desert and Mediterranean Sea to Sweden. The analysis involves the exploring of how migrants strive to prepare, manage and survive the multiple risks and structural barriers they encounter: the exits from Eritrea and Ethiopia, negotiations and contacts with various brokers and facilitators, organized crime and violence, restrictive border controls, passage through the Desert and high Sea and finally, ‘managing the asylum system in Sweden’. Further, it maps how the process of contemporary refugee mobility and multiple transitions is facilitated by the entanglement of transnational social relations and smuggling practices. The study argues for a perspective wherein migration journeys are embedded in and affected by the process of dynamic intergenerational, translocal and transnational social relations, material practices and knowledge productions. It depicts how practices and facilitations of irregular migratory mobility reproduce collective knowledge that refugees mobilize to endure risks during their journey, establishing a community and creating a home after arriving at the destination location.

  • 92.
    Galli, Raoul
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Symboliskt kapital2017In: Nyckelbegrepp i socialantropologin / [ed] Raoul Galli, Stockholm: Socialantropologiska institutionen, Stockholms universitet , 2017, 2 uppl, p. 42-44Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    I Bourdieus konstruktion av begreppet symboliskt kapital ingår ett centralt element som synliggör att det slags fenomen som symboliskt kapital söker ringa in – att någon specifik tillgång eller egenskap igenkänns som värdefull och tillerkänns värde – också väsentligen misskänns (eng. misrecognition) av den aktuella gruppen, som ett av dem själva konstruerat värde. Istället uppfattas den maktform som det uppskattade och värderade ger upphov till, snarare som en fullt legitim-, d.v.s. naturlig, form av kraft, styrka, utstrålning och överordning. Det gör att denna typ av social makt utövas under andra premisser än exempelvis ekonomiskt/materiell makt, eftersom det eventuella egenintresset och strategiska kalkylerandet för att ackumulera symboliskt kapital som maktresurs, blir mer osynligt genom just sin uppfattade ”naturlighet”. Häri ligger ett slags förnekelse och kollektivt självbedrägeri som kan vara närmast avgörande för gruppens hierarkiska stabilitet och sociala ordning.

  • 93.
    Nyqvist, Anette
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Talking like an institutional investor: On the gentle voice of financial giants2017In: Power, policy and profit: Corporate engagements in politics and government / [ed] Christina Garsten, Adrienne Sörbom, Edward Elgar Publishing, 2017Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 94. Abram, Simone
    et al.
    Bianco, B. Feldman
    Khosravi, Shahram
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Salazar, N.
    de Genova, N.
    The free movement of people around the world would be Utopian: IUAES World Congress 20132017In: Identities: Global Studies in Culture and Power, ISSN 1070-289X, E-ISSN 1547-3384, Vol. 24, no 2, p. 123-155Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article contains the text and discussion of a debate held at the IUAES World Congress in Anthropology at Manchester University in 2013. The motion was proposed by Bela Feldman-Bianco (State University of Campinas), seconded by Noel Salazar (University of Leuven) and was opposed by Shahram Khosravi (Stockholm University), seconded by Nicholas de Genova (then at Goldsmiths' College). The debate was chaired by Simone Abram (Durham University).

  • 95.
    Olsson, Erik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    The Guide to Comfort: The Diasporic Practices of Swedish Clubs in Southern Spain2017In: Nordic Journal of Migration Research, ISSN 1799-649X, E-ISSN 1799-649X, Vol. 7, no 3, p. 156-164Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article demonstrates how large social clubs are operating at the locus of an ethnic community-making of Swedish migrants in Southern Spain. The clubs are selectively targeting the relatively wealthy (ethnic) Swedish individuals of older age, offering them a home-like social arena ‘in Swedish’ in which the mediation of information and services is just one of the ‘guidelines’ the clubs offer to ensure the members a comfortable lifestyle in Spain. In this social space, the Swedish migrants meet, socialise and, to some extent, also consume, rather than participating and integrating in Spanish society. The article argues that the practices used by the social clubs are becoming part of the infrastructure guiding migrants towards a Swedish diasporic lifestyle in Southern Spain.

  • 96.
    Nyqvist, Anette
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    The Materiality and Organization of Gold2017Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 97.
    Khosravi, Shahram
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    The Precarious Status of Working-Class Men in Iran2017In: Current history (1941), ISSN 0011-3530, E-ISSN 1944-785X, Vol. 116, no 794, p. 355-359Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The sociopolitical transition can be observed best in the shift of the symbolic position of working-class men: from veneration in the first decade after the revolution to condemnation three decades later.

  • 98.
    Nyqvist, Anette
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    The Travelling Story of Pettersson in the Pacific2017Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 99.
    Garsten, Christina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Tinkering with Knowledge: Representational Practices and Scaling in U.S. Think Tanks2017In: Knowledge and Power in an Overheated World / [ed] Thomas Hylland Eriksen, Elisabeth Schober, Oslo: Department of Social Anthropology, University of Oslo , 2017, p. 98-125Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Think tanks, or policy institutes, are becoming significant ‘sites of normativity’ on the global political scene. While their primary concern often is to provide knowledge,based on which decision makers can make informed choices, they also play a part in setting organizational agendas and priorities, and in mobilizing for political action. Based on ethnographic fieldwork in think tanks in Washington DC, the paper engages with the modes representation used by policy experts as they strive to get traction and 99establish credibility for their ideas. The work of policy experts can be understood as a form of ‘bricolage,’ in which information and normative perspectives are tinkeredwith and are thus afforded truth-value. The use of distanciation and proximation techniques facilitates the continuous scale-making processes in which policy experts are involved and makes possible the ‘evacuation of the near future’.

  • 100.
    Karlsson, Bengt G.
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Kikon, Dolly
    Wayfinding: Indigenous Migrants in the Service Sector of Metropolitan India2017In: South Asia: Journal of South Asian Studies, ISSN 0085-6401, E-ISSN 1479-0270, Vol. 40, no 3, p. 447-462Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the last decade, large numbers of indigenous youth from the uplands of Northeast India have migrated to metropolitan cities across the country. Many end up in the new service sector, getting jobs in high-end restaurants, shopping malls and spas. The demand for their labour is due to their un-Indian 'exotic Asian' appearance and a reputation for being hardworking and loyal. Such labour market value is a remarkable reversal of their position considering the earlier colonial stereotypes of their savagery and disobedience, reproduced through the de-politicisation of their armed insurrections during the post-colonial period. This paper addresses their daily experiences of vulnerability and marginality as well as the freedom and aspirations that a migratory life seem to engender.

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