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  • 51.
    Dahl, Gudrun
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Possession as Cure: The Ayaana Cult of Waso Borana1989In: Culture, Experience and Pluralism: Essays on African Ideas of Illness and Healing / [ed] Anita Jacobson-Widding, David Westerlund, Uppsala: Almqvist & Wiksell, 1989, p. 151-165Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 52.
    Dahl, Gudrun
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Sociology and Beyond: Agency,  Victimization and the ethics of scientific writing.2009In: Asian Journal of Social Science, ISSN 1568-4849, E-ISSN 2212-3857, Vol. 37, no 3, p. 391-407Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    During the last decades, development discourse has taken a neo-liberal turn. Parallel to this, the discourse of social science has become more oriented to matters of individual agency. Within the sociological and anthropological literature on development, this emphasis on individual agency is often expressed in terms of an explicit statement taken by the author that s/he wishes to correct an earlier (ethically inferior) emphasis on structure that is assumed to imply that the concerned people are passive victims. Problematising this ethics of scientific writing, this paper will look at various discourses in which the concept of victimhood is used, seeing claims and disclaimers of victimhood as themselves being expressions of agency in a contestation over accountability, responsibility, recognition and possible indemnification or blame.

  • 53.
    Dahl, Gudrun
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Sources of life and identity1996In: Being and becoming Oromo: historical and anthropological enquiries / [ed] P.T.W. Baxter, Jan Hultin, Alessandro Triulzi, Uppsala: Nordiska Afrikainstitutet, 1996, p. 162-177Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Oromo people are one of the most numerous in Africa. Census data are not reliable but there are probably twenty million people whose first language is Oromo and who recognize themselves as Oromo. In the older literature they are often called Galla. Except for a relatively small number of arid land pastoralists who live in Kenya, all homelands lie in Ethiopia, where they probably make up around 40 percent of the total population. Geographically their territories, though they are not always contiguous, extend from the highlands of Ethiopia in the north, to the Ogaden and Somalia in the east, to the Sudan border in the west, and across the Kenyan border to the Tana River in the south.Though different Oromo groups vary considerably in their modes of subsistence and in their local organizations, they share similar cultures and ways of thought.

  • 54.
    Dahl, Gudrun
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Structure Agency and Victimization: On the ethics of scientific writing2008In: Asian Journal of Social Science: A Special Issue, ISSN 1568-4849Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 55.
    Dahl, Gudrun
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    The Beja of Sudan and the Famine of 1984-19861991In: Ambio, ISSN 0044-7447, E-ISSN 1654-7209, Vol. 20, no 5, p. 189-191Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Howthe Beja, largely apolitical nomadic pastoralists of northeastern Sudan, perceived their profound misfortunes during the drought of the 1 980s is examined. The famine of 1984-1986 was considered neither to have resulted from their own actions nor to be amenable to alleviation by them-both being functions of God, perhaps acting through the central government. Those Beja who were forced by the famine to abandon their traditional ways appear to be ripe for politicization.

  • 56.
    Dahl, Gudrun
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Wildflowers, Nationalism and the Swedish Law of Commons1998In: Worldviews, ISSN 1363-5247, E-ISSN 1568-5357, Vol. 2, no 3, p. 281-302Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In post-war Sweden, overt demonstrations of political nationalism have been considered bad taste. In middle-class culture, the construction and emotional charging of Swedishness have instead taken place in terms of an idiom of love for nature. Conceptions of freedom and equality are by this idiom tied up with symbolic references to childhood and to the flora of forests and meadows. The Swedish 'Every Man's Law' regulating access to flowers and berries and mobility in the natural landscape in this context comes to stand as a central national symbol.

  • 57.
    Dahl, Gudrun
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Words as moral badges: A Flow of Buzzwords in Development Aid2007In: Sustainable Development in a Globalized World: Studies in Development, Security and Culture, Volume 1, Palgrave Macmillan , 2007Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 58.
    Dahl, Gudrun
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Aronsson, Karin
    Kultur, kunskap och vetande1984In: Barn i tid och rum / [ed] Karin Aronsson, Marianne Cederblad, Gudrun Dahl, Lars Olsson, Bengt Sandin, Malmö: Liber, 1984, p. 64-90Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 59.
    Dahl, Gudrun
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Bartholdson, Örjan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Favero, Paolo
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Khosravi, Shahram
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Modernities on the Move2012Book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Tehran, Delhi, Salvador

    The present volume emanates from three studies of youngsters and young adults in three urban contexts in the world: in Tehran in Iran, Delhi in India, and Salvador in Brazil. To them, global as well as local ideas about modernization, traditionalism and authenticity provide frames for interpreting the development of society and evaluating one’s own life.

    The young people that this volume is concerned with were all born in the 1980s. Today they are adults. They all relate to a globalized market of recognition, but also one of potential resources such as attractive commodities, international jobs, local jobs with an international touch, or international support for local activities through the NGO world. Their rod of reference for judging their own life is global. Their sense of time and progress is related to the important developments of their own countries - internally and in relation to the global context - during their own lifespan and possibly that of their parents. Yet, cultural identity is in all the three cases also marked by a relation to ideas about tradition. Becoming modern may also entail redescribing, reinventing and reviving pasts in which the parents’ generation saw little value. The volume as a whole endeavours to give a contribution to the ethnography of varying cultural conceptualisations of modernity.

  • 60.
    Dahl, Gudrun
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Hjort, Anders
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Having herds: pastoral herd growth and household economy1976Book (Refereed)
  • 61.
    Dahl, Gudrun
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Hjort, Anders
    Pastoral change and the role of drought: SAREC report1979Report (Refereed)
  • 62.
    Dahl, Gudrun
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Megerssa, Gemetchu
    The Sources of Life: Boran Concepts of Wells and Water1990In: From Water to World-Making: African Models and Arid Lands / [ed] Gísli Pálsson, Uppsala: Nordiska Afrikainstitutet, 1990, p. 21-38Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 63.
    Dahl, Gudrun
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Stade, Ronald
    Malmö University.
    Introduction: globalization, creolization, and cultural complexity2003In: Global Networks, ISSN 1470-2266, E-ISSN 1471-0374, Vol. 3, no 3, p. 201-206Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This special issue of Global Networks is devoted to the work of Ulf Hannerz, whose research in urban anthropology, media anthropology, and transnational cultural processes has established his international reputation.1 Over the years, this reputationhas earned him many distinctions – he is, for example, a member of the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, former Chair of the European Association of Social Anthropologists, and anthropology editor for the new International Enyclopedia of the Social and Behavioral Sciences. Such honours, however, never led to complacence. There has been a steady stream of publications and a continuous series of research projects. Most recently, Hannerz not only completed a study of the work of news media foreign correspondents, which included field research that took him to four continents, he has already started a new research project about the cultural and political dimensions of cosmopolitanism. All this attests to some measure of curiosity and resolve.

  • 64.
    Dahlén, Tommy
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Among the interculturalists: an emergent profession and its packaging of knowledge1997Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
  • 65.
    Dingu-Kyrklund, Elena
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Research in International Migration and Ethnic Relations (CEIFO).
    Politische Partizipation in Schweden und damit verbundene Aspekte der Integration von ImmigrantInnen2003In: Wiener Hefte zu Migration und Integration in Theorie und Praxis. Defizitäre Demokratie - MigrantInnen in der Politik. Heft 1-2003,, Drava Förlag, Wiener Integrationsfonds, Wien. , 2003Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The article takes up the issue of democratic participation of immigrants in general and in Sweden in particular, especially in the context of elections, in point of access, participation and as an issue of societal integration.

  • 66.
    D'Orsi, Lorenzo
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Asian, Middle Eastern and Turkish Studies, Stockholm University Institute for Turkish Studies (SUITS).
    Conspiracy narratives and memory of political violence within Turkish leftist families2018Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper analyzes conspiracy narratives within Turkish families of leftists revolutionaries affectedby State violence. It shows how such narratives are cultural frameworks through which a practicalknowledge of the State and experiences of political subjugation are conveyed through generations.

  • 67.
    D'Orsi, Lorenzo
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Asian, Middle Eastern and Turkish Studies, Stockholm University Institute for Turkish Studies (SUITS).
    Moral Thresholds of Outrage: The March for Hrant Dink and New Ways of Mobilization in Turkey2018In: Conflict and society: Advances in research, ISSN 2164-4543, E-ISSN 2164-4551, Vol. 4, no 1, p. 40-57Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article analyses the social construction of moral outrage, interpreting it as both an extemporaneous feeling and an enduring process, objectified in narratives and rituals and permeating public spaces as well as the intimate sphere of social actors’ lives. Based on ethnography carried out in Istanbul, this contribution focuses on the assassination of the Turkish Armenian journalist Hrant Dink in 2007. This provoked a moral shock and led to an annual commemoration in which thousands of people—distant in political, religious, ethnic positions—gather around a shared feeling of outrage. The article retraces the narratives of innocence and the moral frames that make Dink’s public figure different from other victims of state violence, thus enabling a moral and emotional identification of a large audience. Outrage over Dink’s murder has become a creative, mobilizing force that fosters new relationships between national history and subjectivity, and de-reifies essentialized social boundaries and identity claims.

  • 68.
    D'Orsi, Lorenzo
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Asian, Middle Eastern and Turkish Studies, Stockholm University Institute for Turkish Studies (SUITS).
    Remembering the 1980 Military Coup: An Anthropological Perspective on the Uses of Oral History in Turkey2018Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper draws on ethnographic investigation carried out in Istanbul on the painful memories of leftist organizations and families affected by the violence of the Turkish military coup of 1980-1983. It aims at critically addressing dichotomist interpretations of the recent proliferation of memory studies in Turkey, such as those relying on the antinomy between official state history and memories from below, or remembering as practice of resistance and state imposed amnesia. There are inherent risks in these approaches, for example an overshadowing of the plurality of uses of oral history in Turkey and of the actors involved in its production.

    The analysis of the uses of the past by former leftist revolutionaries, second generations (i.e. children of revolutionary fighters), as well as those NGOs engaged in bringing out repressed memories, reveals a plurality of logics and targets. Such plurality suggests divergent moral and political frameworks, such as the moral economy of the martyr fighter, in the case of former leftist militants, or the globalized model of Transitional Justice adopted by many NGOs. Through such frameworks, not only silenced memories are brought to light, but individual experiences and collective representations are shaped as well. They should not be analysed independently, because their targets make sense in relational terms within a conflictual, polarized and highly politicized memory field. In the analysis of the uses of oral history, my paper also includes interlocutors from the Turkish intelligentsia (academics, social scientists, artists, journalists). These are public figures endowed with a certain degree of social authority that allows them to address debates on memory. Although based on scientific approaches, their understanding of history and past are based on cultural frames that should be part of the analysis of the memory field.

     

  • 69.
    D'Orsi, Lorenzo
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Asian, Middle Eastern and Turkish Studies, Stockholm University Institute for Turkish Studies (SUITS).
    Temporary street shrine for imagining a different world: the march forHrant Dink2018Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Based on an ethnographic investigation carried out in Istanbul, this contribution analyses the annual commemoration for the Turkish-Armenian journalist Hrant Dink, who was killed in 2007. It sheds light on the role of a temporary street shrine in creating a moral community that crosses previous political, ethnic and religious belongings, and shows the sacred and the ritual as central categories for understanding the formation process of political participation in Turkey. According to many, state apparatus was behind the murder of a journalist who challenged the Turkish state official history. His death provoked an unexpected  “moral shock”, whereby thousands of people - antithetic for political, religious, ethnic positions - coagulate around a shared feeling of outrage and give life to an annual march that stops in the place where Dink was assassinated. Turkish memory field is highly politicized: despite the changes from a secularized to a pro-Islamic state narrative, official state history continues to be a repressive tool against minorities; the latter give life to counter-memories that ask for themselves the monopoly of suffering. Unlike other Turkish counter-hegemonic memories, Dink commemoration stands as mobilizing force able to re-write the relationship between public emotions and political protests, allowing to differently encapsulate a memory at margin.

    This paper retraces the narratives of vulnerability and innocence that have made appear Dink figure different from other victims of state violence, and enabled the identification of a large audience. Though may appear spontaneous, street sanctuary of Dink reveals a rich symbolic grammar, through which protesters break their identity boundaries and search for alternative connections with the “others”. Sounds, colours, memorabilia, ritualized actions, all concur to a mise-en-scène of mourning that (re)produce feeling of sorrow and moral indignation. My contribution shows how the sacred and the rite, here-in understood in Durkheimian terms of extra-ordinary spaces/times, do not merely “express” nor simply “reflect” collective values and social ties, but generate them. The sacred in Dink march creates an alternative moral order, draws a line between justice and injustice and transforms a street corner into a space of contestation, where participants express criticism of the state and society, bring forth a community of memory and remind themselves that ‘a different world’ is possible.

  • 70.
    D'Orsi, Lorenzo
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Asian, Middle Eastern and Turkish Studies, Stockholm University Institute for Turkish Studies (SUITS).
    When silence talks: The moral landscape of leftist painful memories in Turkey2018In: , 2018Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Drawing on an ethnography carried out in Istanbul, this talk examines the experience of silence in Turkish former revolutionaries’ families, the main victims of the 1980-1983 military coup, and challenges the universal model of traumatic silence, which overshadows local conceptualizations of the self. In Turkey, the 1980 coup was a political, cultural and generational watershed that dismantled leftist organizations through incarcerations and tortures. For leftist movements and families, the 1980 coup is the biographical and political tragedy upon which a mnemonic community is built. They are still in a counter-hegemonic position compared to official historiography, but have built a “strong memory” codified through the figure of revolutionary martyrdom.

    Within leftist families, silence and secrecy are common, even when past is told. On the one hand, silence is the consequence of the painful experiences lived by former militants; on the other hand, it cannot be reduced to the pre-cultural mechanism of unspeakable trauma. Domestic silence and secrecy should be understood in relation to the present and not to the past: they do not prevent emotional interactions but are a practical knowledge through which parents teach to second generations to perform a specific self in a still repressive public space. Moreover, silence over personal issues stands also in relation to a morality of “not saying”: it is part of a poetics of the self that is bound to the ethos of revolutionary fighter, whereby “telling is almost like crying”.

    This talk also focuses on generational gap, and shows how second generations often re-read their parents’ silence according to global memory frames, interpreting it as a “traumatic” element. For new generations, the language of trauma is a familiar cultural idiom which also allows them to extend social solidarity and partly break their marginality in an over-politicized memory field.

  • 71.
    D'Orsi, Lorenzo
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Asian, Middle Eastern and Turkish Studies, Stockholm University Institute for Turkish Studies (SUITS).
    Dei, Fabio
    What is a rite? Émile Durkheim, a hundred years later2018In: Open Information Science, E-ISSN 2451-1781, Vol. 2, no 1, p. 115-126Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper is focused on the anthropological concept of ritual, starting from Emile Durkheim's approach in Les formes élémentaires de la vie religieuse (1912). We discuss three different aspects of the Durkheimian perspective on religion and rituals: a) the sacred/profane dichotomy; b) the concept of collective representations - which establishes a substantial continuity between religious and scientific thought; c) a ‟practical” and performative interpretation of rites as the basis of social bond. During the twentieth century, these aspects have influenced different and sometimes opposing theoretical approaches (including ‟symbolist” and ‟neo-intellectualist” theories and Victor Turner's ‟anthropology of experience”). We briefly review each of them, arguing for the importance of reconsidering them into a unitary perspective, centred on religious phenomena as basically moral experiences and as the language of social relations. In the conclusions, we will show how such unitary approach helps us understand the transformations as well as the continuities of rituality in the individualized and secularized societies of what we call nowadays the Western world.

  • 72.
    Edelman, Birgitta
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Shunters at work: creating a world in a railway yard1997Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Skills, and particularly manual skills, are often seen as acquired through unquestioning practice and drill. This is an ethnographic account of a group of railway workers, called shunters, who are occupied with the manual task of assembling carriages into trains. It is here claimed that the acquisition of shunting skills is conditioned by the apprentices' preconceived ideas of 'male', manual, outdoor work and by the dynamics of master-apprentice relations. Two different types of learning strategies, adopted by female and male apprentices respectively, are identified. It is claimed that these strategies lead to differential success in advancement at work. In contrast to approaches which see skill as individual mastery of given tasks it is argued that conceptions of skilful work are subject to social construction.

    Since cooperation calls for communication, the communicative aspects of skill come into the fore in this type of high-risk work. Card-playing is studied as an arena for expression of skills related to handling risks at work.

    Team-work, marked by cooperation and uninterrupted fluency, here called 'flow', is ideally based on informal relations and an egalitarian ethos. It is simultaneously thought to presuppose a structured hierarchy of well defined work roles. Team-work is also seen to demand a collective spirit, although idiosyncratic work styles and individualistic behaviour are encouraged. The treatise demonstrates how such contradictory understandings are expressed and mediated in practice, and how they are reconceptualized during a period of uncertainty caused by reorganization and change.

    The work is based on participation as well as participant observation in one of the largest railway yards for passenger trains in Sweden.

  • 73.
    Einarsdóttir, Jónína
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    "Tired of weeping": child death and mourning among Papel mothers in Guinea-Bissau2000Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The study examines the assumption that mothers in poverty stricken areas with high rates of fertility and child mortality will, as a survival strategy, neglect their children, sometimes with a fatal outcome and then fail to mourn their death. The thesis is based on anthropological fieldwork conducted in 1993-98 among the Papel people in Guinea-Bissau, West-Africa. Participant observation, interviewing and surveys were the main methods used. The study emphasises the agency and voices of individual Papel mothers, and their varied experiences, practices and opinions. At the same time it seeks to illuminate women's common patterns of thinking and acting but also the constraints and structures that curtail their choices. The Papel women's situation as wives in a polygamous society is explored as well as their motives for becoming mothers. Birth and breastfeeding practices are examined in the light of maternal bonding theory. The thesis further explores the following questions: Are conceptions of children reflected in childcare practices? Does the way mothers interpret disease and death, and their ideas about afterlife, influence their patterns of healthcare seeking and mourning? What are the local ideas about deviant or disabled children and how are they treated?

    The conclusion of the study is that Papel mothers do not neglect their children in terms of daily care or during illness. Nor do mothers fail to mourn children who die, irrespective of whether they are normal children, favourite children or children suspected to be spirit children, without a human soul. However, mother love is not unilaterally self-sacrificing and unconditional. Mothers emphasise their suffering because they give birth to children, but they expect to become rewarded for their suffering in social, economic and emotional terms. The thesis argues that poverty and high rates of child mortality do not necessarily produce neglectful and non-remorseful mothers. Religion, kinship, and economy shape gender relations and cultural values attributed to reproduction and motherhood, which in turn influence maternal sentiments and practice. Among the Papel, the system of matrilineal descent gives mothers, together with their lineage members, a central role in seeking healthcare for children, whatever the category. Poverty and high expectancy of child mortality contribute to maternal anguish and distress in relation to child delivery, diseases and death, not indifference.

  • 74.
    Ekal, Berna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Asian, Middle Eastern and Turkish Studies, Stockholm University Institute for Turkish Studies (SUITS).
    Collaboration gone awry: The formation of women’s shelters as public institutions in Turkey2017In: Mediterranean Politics, ISSN 1362-9395, E-ISSN 1743-9418Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In terms of women’s shelters, Turkey sets a unique example due to the fact that the shelters are mainly established and run by public actors, whereas in other countries these institutions are mainly run by NGOs while funded by public authorities. By looking at the relation between the feminist movement and the public authorities from 1990s onwards, this paper argues that in the case of the public women’s shelters, the engagement of non-public actors in the policy making processes did not result in the retreat, but in the perpetuation of the state’s presence.

  • 75.
    Ekdahl, Björn
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Up and Run: Ett antropologiskt perspektiv på löpning2012Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    People sign up for various races in Sweden and internationally. I have participated in the practice of running and I have done twenty-five interviews with runners in Belfast and Stockholm. I have also taken part in a training trip to Portugal. This master's thesis answers the question of individuals' experiences of running and the focus has been the physical and emotional experience runners get from running. From a wider perspective I discuss how running create meaning and identity through emotional and physical experience gained trans- locally. With runners, I mean people who run for their own benefit and not professional runners. What kind of bodily experiences and what emotions raise the run?

    From an anthropological perspective I discuss emotions, which encompass both feelings and meanings of running shared by runners in what I call, with help of Appadurai (1996) a runningscape. The emotions are culturally created in this runningscape, and still perceived as unique to the individual.

    My study is theoretically infused by Gidden’s perspective on lifestyle and Merleau-Ponty’s phenomenological focus on the body. Merleau-Ponty thoughts on”embodied consciousness”are linked to the anthropological perspective of emotions. The runner and the run with the bodily and emotional experiences clarify the meaning of "embodied consciousness". That creates meaning and identity and affects the choices we make in everyday life.

    In this study, I have been able to identify three types of runners. The first one is ”thinking runners” who put more emphasis on learning everything about technicalities of running. For them the feeling of accomplishment is important. The second is ”feeling-runners” in which the bodily experience of rhythm, body, and a meditative sense is important. The third one is”health-runners” where the responsibilities for their own health are in focus.

    This study has shown that running gives a strong sense of enthusiasm and energy combined with a sense of peace and tranquillity, which combine to create a sense of purpose. I argue that an anthropological perspective based on emotions can in further studies help to discuss the individual's lifestyle choices in everyday life.

    Key words: Emotions, body, runners, running, embodiment, meaning, identity

  • 76. Eriksen Hylland, Thomas
    et al.
    Garsten, ChristinaStockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.Randeria, Shalini
    Anthropology now and next: essays in honor of Ulf Hannerz2014Collection (editor) (Refereed)
  • 77.
    Eriksson, Gunilla
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Lidén, Kerstin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Dietary life histories in Stone Age Northern Europe2013In: Journal of Anthropological Archaeology, ISSN 0278-4165, E-ISSN 1090-2686, Vol. 32, no 3, p. 288-302Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We present here a framework for using stable isotope analysis of bone and teeth to study individual life history. A sampling strategy and analytical approach for stable carbon and nitrogen analysis of bone and dentine collagen optimised for intra-individual purposes is put forward. The rationale behind this strategy, various requirements and constrains, and recommendations on how to modify it according to variations in material and analytical instrumentation, are discussed and explained in detail. Based on intra-individual data for 131 human individuals from Mesolithic and Neolithic sites in Northern Europe, we consider the sources and various kinds of variation one is likely to find, and how the data can be explained and transformed into an archaeologically meaningful interpretation. It is concluded that the use of stable isotope analysis to trace individual life history is not limited to carefully excavated, neatly preserved, single burials with articulate skeletal remains. Even collective burials, disturbed graves, disarticulated human remains in cultural layers, or other depositions that deviate from what is often considered as a proper burial, offer the possibility to look at individual life biographies.

  • 78.
    Eriksson, Åsa
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Ethnology, History of Religions and Gender Studies, Gender Studies.
    Farm worker identities contested and reimagined: gender, race/ethnicity and nationality in the post-strike moment2017In: Anthropology Southern Africa, ISSN 2332-3256, Vol. 40, no 4, p. 248-260Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In 2012/2013, widespread rural unrest — commonly referred to as the “farm worker strike” — broke out in the Western Cape, South Africa. This exposed not only poor salaries and working conditions, but also the disparity between representations of farm workers as too restrained by paternalism to dare challenge farmers and the open defiance displayed by protesters. Initial participants were identified as pertaining to categories of workers that for long were relegated to the discursive shadows in representations of Western Cape farm workers: seasonal and casual workers residing primarily off-farm, out of whom many were black South African women and migrants from neighbouring countries. Consequently, they were dismissed by some as not being (real) farm workers. This article explores the protests as a moment when contestations and renegotiations of the meaning of the category “farm worker” were brought to the surface. It suggests that paying attention to intersecting power relations of gender, race/ethnicity and nationality may illuminate silences and exclusions in representations of farm workers.

  • 79.
    Escobar López, Daniel
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    "Las mujeres despiertas”: el papel del género en el control de un terreno comunal en los Andes peruanos2017In: Revista de Antropología Social, ISSN 1131-558X, Vol. 26, no 2, p. 307-332Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article aims to explore the role of gender relations in the control and use of communal land in a peasant village located in the Peruvian Andes. The context is the current process of acquiring land private deeds, which even though began several years ago, in the region, has been speeded-upby the current plans to build an international airport closed to the village. We will discuss how the emergence of a tourist attraction (El Mirador) and the consequent formation of a female handicraf tassociation has affected the gender configurations of the village and helped to raise women’s political participation.

  • 80.
    Escobar López, Daniel
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    The Shifting Phases of a Commodity: Textiles and Ethnic Tourism on a Lake Titicaca Island2012In: Totem: The University of Western Ontario Journal of Anthropology, ISSN 1925-8542, Vol. 20, no 1Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The case study of the island of Taquile in the Peruvian part of Lake Titicaca will be used to explore how textiles functions as intermediaries for social interactions and change and how they respond to demands from ethnic tourism. By using theories of material culture, specifically the analytical approach of "the biography", I aim to shed light on the process by which some textiles in Taquile have passed from being the person’s “second skin” to a commodity responding to ethnic tourism. However, such a process, rather than being contradictory, expresses the capacity of Taquilean culture to adapt the local values to a monetary economy. Taquilean culture is also an agent in these encounters with tourism, impeding the complete commoditization of the textiles.

  • 81.
    Finnström, Sverker
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    An African hell of colonial imagination?: The Lord's Resistance Army/Movement in Uganda, another story2008In: Politique Africaine, ISSN 0244-7827, E-ISSN 2264-5047, no 112, p. 119-139Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Lord’s Resistance Army/Movement (LRA/M) in Uganda is now world infamous for its violence. As most observers, including academics, have dismissed the LRA/M on moral grounds, they have disqualified the movement as nonpolitical, rebels without a cause other than their allegedly bizarre syncretic beliefs. This article indicates an alternative or perhaps complementary direction. In presenting something of a rarity in the academic literature on the war in Northern Uganda, the article examines actual LRA/M documents, arguing that there is a continuity in the claims and political grievances put forward by the LRA/M throughout the years.

  • 82.
    Finnström, Sverker
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Child Soldiers in Africa by Alcinda Honwana2008In: Journal of Modern African Studies, ISSN 0022-278X, E-ISSN 1469-7777, Vol. 46, no 1, p. 161-162Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 83.
    Finnström, Sverker
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Culture in Chaos: An Anthropology of the Social Condition in War. Stephen C. Lubkemann2009In: Journal of anthropological research, ISSN 0091-7710, E-ISSN 2153-3806, Vol. 65, no 3, p. 510-512Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 84.
    Finnström, Sverker
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Gendered War and Rumors of Saddam Hussein in Uganda2009In: Anthropology and Humanism, ISSN 1559-9167, E-ISSN 1548-1409, Vol. 34, no 1, p. 61-70Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article discusses the role of rumors in everyday Acholi life in war‐torn northern Uganda. These rumors concern various health threats such as HIV and Ebola. The rumors are closely associated with the forces of domination that are alleged to destroy female sexuality and women's reproductive health and, by extension, Acholi humanity. Moreover, the rumors are stories that say something profound about lived entrapments and political asymmetries in Uganda and beyond.

  • 85.
    Finnström, Sverker
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Inget bistånd är neutralt2008In: Svenska dagbladet, ISSN 1101-2412, no 12 decemberArticle in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [sv]

    Vågspel: Humanitärt bistånd kan stjälpa snarare än hjälpa, om man inte sätter sig in i den aktuella problematiken och ställer tydliga och kontinuerliga krav på hur stödet skall användas. I Uganda har den bristande kontrollen bidragit till att cementera ett ickedemokratiskt styre.

  • 86.
    Finnström, Sverker
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Inside West Nile: violence, history and representation on an African frontier by Mark Leopold Oxford, Santa Fe and Kampala: James Currey, School of American Research Press and Fountain Publishers2007In: Journal of Modern African Studies, ISSN 0022-278X, E-ISSN 1469-7777, Vol. 45, no 3, p. 485-486Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 87.
    Finnström, Sverker
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Julie Flint och Alex de Waals, Darfur: Konfliktens bakgrund (Celanders förlag, 2007)2008In: Arena, ISSN 1652-0556, no 1, p. 59-59Article, book review (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 88.
    Finnström, Sverker
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Living with Bad Surroundings: War, history, and everyday moments in northern Uganda2008Book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Since 1986, the Acholi people of northern Uganda have lived in the crossfire of a violent civil war, with the Lord’s Resistance Army and other groups fighting the Ugandan government. Acholi have been murdered, maimed, and driven into displacement. Thousands of children have been abducted and forced to fight. Many observers have perceived Acholiland and northern Uganda to be an exception in contemporary Uganda, which has been celebrated by the international community for its increased political stability and particularly for its fight against AIDS. These observers tend to portray the Acholi as war-prone, whether because of religious fanaticism or intractable ethnic hatreds. In Living with Bad Surroundings, Sverker Finnström rejects these characterizations and challenges other simplistic explanations for the violence in northern Uganda. Foregrounding the narratives of individual Acholi, Finnström enables those most affected by the ongoing “dirty war” to explain how they participate in, comprehend, survive, and even resist it.

    Finnström draws on fieldwork conducted in northern Uganda between 1997 and 2006 to describe how the Acholi—especially the younger generation, those born into the era of civil strife—understand and attempt to control their moral universe and material circumstances. Structuring his argument around indigenous metaphors and images, notably the Acholi concepts of good and bad surroundings, he vividly renders struggles in war and the related ills of impoverishment, sickness, and marginalization. In this rich ethnography, Finnström provides a clear-eyed assessment of the historical, cultural, and political underpinnings of the civil war while maintaining his focus on Acholi efforts to achieve “good surroundings,” viable futures for themselves and their families.

  • 89.
    Finnström, Sverker
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Panafrikanism 30002007In: Arena, ISSN 1652-0556, no 2, p. 30-33Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 90.
    Finnström, Sverker
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology. Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Terror and Violence: Imagination and the Unimaginable. Edited by Andrew Strathern, Pamela J. Stewart, and Neil L. Whitehead2007In: Ethnohistory, ISSN 0014-1801, E-ISSN 1527-5477, Vol. 54, no 4, p. 771-773Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 91.
    Finnström, Sverker
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    The Fear of the Midnight Knock: State Sovereignty and Internal Enemies in Uganda2009In: Crisis of the State: War and Social Upheaval / [ed] Bruce Kapferer, Bjørn Enge Bertelsen, New York, Oxford: Berghahn Books, 2009, p. 124-142Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 92.
    Finnström, Sverker
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Atkinson, Ronald R.
    Building sustainable peace in northern Uganda2008In: Horn of Africa Bulletin, ISSN 1100-2840, Vol. 20, no 4, p. 1-3Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 93.
    Flyverbom, Mikkel
    et al.
    Copenhagen Business School.
    Garsten, Christina
    Copenhagen Business School.
    The sway of (big) data: calculations and advocacy in the name of transparency2013Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 94. Freyer, John
    et al.
    Lindquist, Johan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Lillbilly:  2012In: Hjärnstorm, ISSN 0348-6958, no 110Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 95.
    Frisell Ellburg, Ann
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Ett fåfängt arbete: Möten med modeller i den svenska modeindustrin2008Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis is a study of the working life of fashion models in the Swedish Fashion Industry based on 18 months of ethnographic fieldwork among a network of female and male models in Stockholm. It charts the development of the modelling business in Sweden and locates it within the changing labour market of late capitalism. The study highlights the paradoxes and contradictions of the modelling profession, which provides both extraordinary career opportunities but is also full of risks and temptations, especially for young female models. Unlike many other studies of the model business, the working lives of male models and the particular challenges they face also receive attention. Two main theoretical areas are examined in this book. One deals with the fact that a model’s body is a sexualized commodity in the market. The ability to project a sexual image at work can enhance a model’s career, but this sexualization and objectification is experienced as problematic by male and female models alike, although for different reasons. In the case of women, it involves the need to appear respectable; while for men attempting to live up to heteronormative expectations of masculinity is continually challenged in a profession coded as ‘female’. A solution employed by many models is to create a professional mask or job-persona, that is detached from what they regard as their inner or authentic self. The issue of authenticity emerges as an important concern for many models and is a theme that runs through the entire thesis. A second theoretical area is the power relations that structure the modelling business, including the relationship between fashion models and model agencies, stylists, and photographers. How models manage these power relations in the form of emotional labour, compromises, or even by occasional challenges to authority is illuminated in the study.

  • 96.
    Frostling-Henningsson, Maria
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Advertising and Public Relations.
    Consumer Strategies for Coping with Dilemmas in Food Choices: Perspectives on Food Choices and the Meals2012In: Time for Food: Everyday Food and Changing Meal Habits in a Global Perspective / [ed] Patricia Lysaght, Åbo: Åbo Akademis Förlag, 2012, p. 331-345Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 97.
    Frostling-Henningsson, Maria
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Advertising and Public Relations.
    Hedbom, Martin
    Wilandh, Ludvid
    You have to eat French fries and Bernaise sauce otherwise life is over!: consumers' dilemmas concerning food choices2012In: Nordic retail research: emerging diversity / [ed] Johan Hagberg, Ulrika Holmberg, Malin Sundström, Lars Walter, Göteborg: BAS , 2012, p. 33-47Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Studies of food choices are often made in isolation, concerning a single product and regarded as an individual consumer activity. The social and cultural system, in which food choices are made, is often neglected. This paper argues that food choices are influenced by the household members and take place in a social context. Compromises between contradicting demands of different household members becomes the solution to align individual preferences. There are many individual wills to consider in order to buy, to cook and to serve food that suits all family members. Traditional attitude models that have been used in food studies when measuring determinants of food choices have had a rather low rate of predictability. What people say they intend to buy is not the same as the actual choice in the food store.  Hence, it often exist a gap between intention and practices.

    The paper aims at presenting some consumer strategies that consumers employ in order to mediate dilemmas when choosing what food to buy. In order to shed light on the processes that occur between intentions and practices concerning food choices different qualitative methods were applied. A consumer panel consisting of 33 Swedish households was followed over one and a half year. Various consumer dilemmas were identified: price and quality, time and ambition, health and taste, originality and children´s demands and organic and eco-friendly. In order to solve these dilemmas consumer used various strategies such as 1) Justification of non-choices, 2) Compensatory food habits, 3) Individualized food habits and 4) Agony reducing strategies.

    Key words: intentions, practices, food choices, consumer panel, qualitative method

  • 98.
    Fuehrer, Paul
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Strövtåg mot förnimmelsens nollpunkt: Exotism och reflexivitet i 'Den skyddande himlen'1994In: Filmhäftet, ISSN 0345-3057, no 87, p. 48-54Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 99.
    Fägerborg, Eva
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities.
    Miljoner och my: kunskapssyn och tänkande på en verkstadsindustri1996Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
  • 100.
    Galli, Raoul
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Bourdieu - och kampen om erkännande: Stort firande i Frankrike tio år efter Bourdieus död2012Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [sv]

    För intellektuella som  tidigt lockades av lyskraften i Pierre Bourdieus mest kända begrepp, jag tänker på sådana som habitus, fält och symboliskt- och kulturellt kapital, för dem verkar fascinationen snabbt ha avtagit när begreppen blev allmängods, inte minst på tidningarnas kultursidor, och därmed devalverade på just sitt symboliska kapital. För andra, som tagit sig tid att gå i mer varaktig närkamp med begreppen,  tycks lärdomen däremot stadigt växa om vad man kan göra med de bourdiueska verktygen, specialkonstruerade som de är för studier av den sociala verkligheten.

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