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  • 51.
    Folke, Carl
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Stockholm Resilience Centre. Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences, Sweden,.
    Biggs, Reinette
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Stockholm Resilience Centre. University of Stellenbosch, South Africa.
    Norström, Albert V.
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Reyers, Belinda
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Rockström, Johan
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Social-ecological resilience and biosphere-based sustainability science2016Inngår i: Ecology & Society, E-ISSN 1708-3087, Vol. 21, nr 3, artikkel-id 41Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Humanity has emerged as a major force in the operation of the biosphere. The focus is shifting from the environment as externality to the biosphere as precondition for social justice, economic development, and sustainability. In this article, we exemplify the intertwined nature of social-ecological systems and emphasize that they operate within, and as embedded parts of the biosphere and as such coevolve with and depend on it. We regard social-ecological systems as complex adaptive systems and use a social-ecological resilience approach as a lens to address and understand their dynamics. We raise the challenge of stewardship of development in concert with the biosphere for people in diverse contexts and places as critical for long-term sustainability and dignity in human relations. Biosphere stewardship is essential, in the globalized world of interactions with the Earth system, to sustain and enhance our life-supporting environment for human well-being and future human development on Earth, hence, the need to reconnect development to the biosphere foundation and the need for a biosphere-based sustainability science.

  • 52.
    Folke, Carl
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Systemekologiska institutionen.
    Gunderson, L
    Facing global change through social-ecological research2006Inngår i: Ecology and Society, Vol. 11, nr 2, s. no. 43-Artikkel i tidsskrift (Annet vitenskapelig)
  • 53.
    Folke, Carl
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Stockholm Resilience Centre. The Beijer Institute, Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences, Sweden.
    Jansson, Åsa
    Stockholms universitet, Stockholm Resilience Centre. The Beijer Institute, Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences, Sweden.
    Rockström, Johan
    Stockholms universitet, Stockholm Resilience Centre, Stockholm Environment Institute.
    Olsson, Per
    Stockholms universitet, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Crépin, Anne-Sophie
    Stockholms universitet, Stockholm Resilience Centre. The Beijer Institute, Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences, Sweden.
    Ebbesson, Jonas
    Stockholms universitet, Stockholm Resilience Centre. Stockholms universitet, Juridiska fakulteten, Juridiska institutionen, Stockholms miljörättscentrum (SMC).
    Elmqvist, Thomas
    Stockholms universitet, Stockholm Resilience Centre. Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Systemekologiska institutionen.
    Galaz, Victor
    Stockholms universitet, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Moberg, Fredrik
    Stockholms universitet, Stockholm Resilience Centre. Albaeco, Stockholm, Sweden .
    Nilsson, Måns
    Stockholms universitet, Stockholm Resilience Centre, Stockholm Environment Institute.
    Österblom, Henrik
    Stockholms universitet, Stockholm Resilience Centre, Baltic Nest Institute.
    Persson, Åsa
    Stockholms universitet, Stockholm Resilience Centre, Stockholm Environment Institute.
    Peterson, Garry
    Stockholms universitet, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Steffen, Will
    Stockholms universitet, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Walker, Brian
    Stockholms universitet, Stockholm Resilience Centre. The Beijer Institute, Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences, Sweden; CSIRO Sustainable Ecosystems, Canberra, ACT, Australia .
    Reconnecting to the biosphere2011Inngår i: Ambio, ISSN 0044-7447, E-ISSN 1654-7209, Vol. 40, nr 7, s. 719-738Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Humanity has emerged as a major force in the operation of the biosphere, with a significant imprint on the Earth System, challenging social-ecological resilience. This new situation calls for a fundamental shift in perspectives, world views, and institutions. Human development and progress must be reconnected to the capacity of the biosphere and essential ecosystem services to be sustained. Governance challenges include a highly interconnected and faster world, cascading social-ecological interactions and planetary boundaries that create vulnerabilities but also opportunities for social-ecological change and transformation. Tipping points and thresholds highlight the importance of understanding and managing resilience. New modes of flexible governance are emerging. A central challenge is to reconnect these efforts to the changing preconditions for societal development as active stewards of the Earth System. We suggest that the Millennium Development Goals need to be reframed in such a planetary stewardship context combined with a call for a new social contract on global sustainability. The ongoing mind shift in human relations with Earth and its boundaries provides exciting opportunities for societal development in collaboration with the biosphere-a global sustainability agenda for humanity.

  • 54.
    Folke, Carl
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Stockholm Resilience Centre. Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences, Sweden.
    Kautsky, Nils
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för ekologi, miljö och botanik.
    Aquaculture and ocean stewardship2022Inngår i: Ambio, ISSN 0044-7447, E-ISSN 1654-7209, Vol. 51, nr 1, s. 13-16Artikkel i tidsskrift (Annet vitenskapelig)
  • 55.
    Folke, Carl
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Stockholm Resilience Centre. Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences, Sweden.
    Polasky, Stephen
    Rockström, Johan
    Galaz, Victor
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Westley, Frances
    Lamont, Michèle
    Scheffer, Marten
    Österblom, Henrik
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Carpenter, Stephen R.
    Chapin, F. Stuart
    Seto, Karen C.
    Weber, Elke U.
    Crona, Beatrice
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Stockholm Resilience Centre. Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences, Sweden.
    Daily, Gretchen C.
    Dasgupta, Partha
    Gaffney, Owen
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Stockholm Resilience Centre. Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research, Germany.
    Gordon, Line J.
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Hoff, Holger
    Levin, Simon A.
    Lubchenco, Jane
    Steffen, Will
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Stockholm Resilience Centre. Australian National University, Australia.
    Walker, Brian H.
    Our future in the Anthropocene biosphere2021Inngår i: Ambio, ISSN 0044-7447, E-ISSN 1654-7209, Vol. 50, nr 4, s. 834-869Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    The COVID-19 pandemic has exposed an interconnected and tightly coupled globalized world in rapid change. This article sets the scientific stage for understanding and responding to such change for global sustainability and resilient societies. We provide a systemic overview of the current situation where people and nature are dynamically intertwined and embedded in the biosphere, placing shocks and extreme events as part of this dynamic; humanity has become the major force in shaping the future of the Earth system as a whole; and the scale and pace of the human dimension have caused climate change, rapid loss of biodiversity, growing inequalities, and loss of resilience to deal with uncertainty and surprise. Taken together, human actions are challenging the biosphere foundation for a prosperous development of civilizations. The Anthropocene reality-of rising system-wide turbulence-calls for transformative change towards sustainable futures. Emerging technologies, social innovations, broader shifts in cultural repertoires, as well as a diverse portfolio of active stewardship of human actions in support of a resilient biosphere are highlighted as essential parts of such transformations.

  • 56.
    Folke, Carl
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Systemekologiska institutionen.
    Pritchard, L
    Berkes, F
    Colding, Johan
    Svedin, U
    The problem of fit between ecosystems and institutions: ten years later2007Inngår i: Ecology and Society, Vol. 12, nr 1, s. nr. 30-Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
  • 57.
    Folke, Carl
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Stockholm Resilience Centre. Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences, Sweden.
    Österblom, Henrik
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Jouffray, Jean-Baptiste
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Stockholm Resilience Centre. Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences, Sweden.
    Lambin, Eric F.
    Adger, W. Neil
    Scheffer, Marten
    Crona, Beatrice
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Stockholm Resilience Centre. Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences, Sweden.
    Nyström, Magnus
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Stockholm Resilience Centre. Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences, Sweden.
    Levin, Simon A.
    Carpenter, Stephen R.
    Anderies, John M.
    Chapin, Stuart
    Crepin, Anne-Sophie
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Stockholm Resilience Centre. Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences, Sweden.
    Dauriach, Alice
    Galaz, Victor
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Stockholm Resilience Centre. Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences, Sweden.
    Gordon, Line J.
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Stockholm Resilience Centre. Stockholm Univ, Stockholm Resilience Ctr, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Kautsky, Nils
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för ekologi, miljö och botanik.
    Walker, Brian H.
    Watson, James R.
    Wilen, James
    de Zeeuw, Aart
    Transnational corporations and the challenge of biosphere stewardship2019Inngår i: Nature Ecology & Evolution, E-ISSN 2397-334X, Vol. 3, nr 10, s. 1396-1403Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Sustainability within planetary boundaries requires concerted action by individuals, governments, civil society and private actors. For the private sector, there is concern that the power exercised by transnational corporations generates, and is even central to, global environmental change. Here, we ask under which conditions transnational corporations could either hinder or promote a global shift towards sustainability. We show that a handful of transnational corporations have become a major force shaping the global intertwined system of people and planet. Transnational corporations in agriculture, forestry, seafood, cement, minerals and fossil energy cause environmental impacts and possess the ability to influence critical functions of the biosphere. We review evidence of current practices and identify six observed features of change towards 'corporate biosphere stewardship', with significant potential for upscaling. Actions by transnational corporations, if combined with effective public policies and improved governmental regulations, could substantially accelerate sustainability efforts.

  • 58.
    Galaz, Victor
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Biermann, Frank
    Crona, Beatrice
    Stockholms universitet, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Loorbach, Derk
    Folke, Carl
    Stockholms universitet, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Olsson, Per
    Stockholms universitet, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Nilsson, Måns
    Stockholms universitet, Stockholm Resilience Centre, Stockholm Environment Institute.
    Allouche, Jeremy
    Persson, Åsa
    Stockholms universitet, Stockholm Resilience Centre, Stockholm Environment Institute.
    Reischl, Gunilla
    'Planetary boundaries' - exploring the challenges for global environmental governance2012Inngår i: Current Opinion in Environmental Sustainability, ISSN 1877-3435, E-ISSN 1877-3443, Vol. 4, nr 1, s. 80-87Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    A range of studies from Earth system scientists argue that human activities drive multiple, interacting effects that cascade through the Earth system. Recent contributions state and quantify nine, interacting 'planetary boundaries' with possible threshold effects. This article provides an overview of the global governance challenges that follow from this notion of multiple, interacting and possibly non-linear 'planetary boundaries'. Here we discuss four interrelated global environmental governance challenges, as well as some possible ways to address them. The four identified challenges are related to, first, the interplay between Earth system science and global policies, and the implications of differences in risk perceptions in defining these boundaries; second, the capacity of international institutions to deal with individual 'planetary boundaries', as well as interactions between them; third, the role of international organizations in dealing with 'planetary boundaries' interactions; and fourth, the role of global governance in framing social ecological innovations.

  • 59.
    Galaz, Victor
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Crona, Beatrice
    Stockholms universitet, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Österblom, Henrik
    Stockholms universitet, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Olsson, Per
    Stockholms universitet, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Folke, Carl
    Stockholms universitet, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Polycentric systems and interacting planetary boundaries: Emerging governance of climate change—ocean acidification—marine biodiversity2012Inngår i: Ecological Economics, ISSN 0921-8009, E-ISSN 1873-6106, Vol. 81, s. 21-32Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Planetary boundaries and their interactions pose severe challenges for global environmental governance due to their inherent uncertainties and complex multi-scale dynamics. Here we explore the global governance challenge posed by planetary boundaries interactions by focusing on the role of polycentric systems and order, a theoretical field that has gained much interest in the aftermath of claims of a stagnant UN-process. In the first part we work toward a clarification of polycentric order in an international context, and develop three propositions. We then present a case study of the emergence of international polycentricity to address interacting planetary boundaries, namely the climate change, ocean acidification and loss of marine biodiversity complex. This is done through a study of the Global Partnership on Climate, Fisheries and Aquaculture (PaCFA) initiative. As the case study indicates, a range of mechanisms of polycentric order (ranging from information sharing to coordinated action and conflict resolution) operates at the international level through the interplay between individuals, international organizations and their collaboration patterns. While polycentric coordination of this type certainly holds potential, it is also vulnerable to internal tensions, unreliable external flows of funding, and negative institutional interactions.

  • 60. Garmestani, Ahjond
    et al.
    Ruhl, J. B.
    Chaffin, Brian C.
    Craig, Robin K.
    van Rijswick, Helena F. M. W.
    Angeler, David G.
    Folke, Carl
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Stockholm Resilience Centre. Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences, Sweden.
    Gunderson, Lance
    Twidwell, Dirac
    Allen, Craig R.
    Untapped capacity for resilience in environmental law2019Inngår i: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, ISSN 0027-8424, E-ISSN 1091-6490, Vol. 116, nr 40, s. 19899-19904Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Over the past several decades, environmental governance has made substantial progress in addressing environmental change, but emerging environmental problems require new innovations in law, policy, and governance. While expansive legal reform is unlikely to occur soon, there is untapped potential in existing laws to address environmental change, both by leveraging adaptive and transformative capacities within the law itself to enhance social-ecological resilience and by using those laws to allow social-ecological systems to adapt and transform. Legal and policy research to date has largely overlooked this potential, even though it offers a more expedient approach to addressing environmental change than waiting for full-scale environmental law reform. We highlight examples from the United States and the European Union of untapped capacity in existing laws for fostering resilience in social-ecological systems. We show that governments and other governance agents can make substantial advances in addressing environmental change in the short term-without major legal reform-by exploiting those untapped capacities, and we offer principles and strategies to guide such initiatives.

  • 61. Gelcich, Stefan
    et al.
    Hughes, Terry P.
    Olsson, Per
    Stockholms universitet, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Folke, Carl
    Stockholms universitet, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Defeo, Omar
    Fernandez, Miriam
    Foale, Simon
    Gunderson, Lance H.
    Rodriguez-Sickert, Carlos
    Scheffer, Marten
    Steneck, Robert S.
    Castilla, Juan C.
    Navigating transformations in governance of Chilean marine coastal resources2010Inngår i: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, ISSN 0027-8424, E-ISSN 1091-6490, Vol. 107, nr 39, s. 16794-16799Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Marine ecosystems are in decline. New transformational changes in governance are urgently required to cope with overfishing, pollution, global changes, and other drivers of degradation. Here we explore social, political, and ecological aspects of a transformation in governance of Chile's coastal marine resources, from 1980 to today. Critical elements in the initial preparatory phase of the transformation were (i) recognition of the depletion of resource stocks, (ii) scientific knowledge on the ecology and resilience of targeted species and their role in ecosystem dynamics, and (iii) demonstration-scale experimental trials, building on smaller-scale scientific experiments, which identified new management pathways. The trials improved cooperation among scientists and fishers, integrating knowledge and establishing trust. Political turbulence and resource stock collapse provided a window of opportunity that triggered the transformation, supported by new enabling legislation. Essential elements to navigate this transformation were the ability to network knowledge from the local level to influence the decision-making processes at the national level, and a preexisting social network of fishers that provided political leverage through a national confederation of artisanal fishing collectives. The resultant governance scheme includes a revolutionary national system of marine tenure that allocates user rights and responsibilities to fisher collectives. Although fine tuning is necessary to build resilience of this new regime, this transformation has improved the sustainability of the interconnected social-ecological system. Our analysis of how this transformation unfolded provides insights into how the Chilean system could be further developed and identifies generalized pathways for improved governance of marine resources around the world.

  • 62.
    Gordon, Line
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för systemekologi.
    Folke, Carl
    Stockholms universitet, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Ecohydrological landscape management for human well-being.2002Inngår i: Water International, ISSN 0250-8060, Vol. 25, nr 2, s. 178-184Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper introduces a new perspective on water resources emphasizing the role of water vapor flows for human well-being. The connections between freshwater and ecosystem services in terrestrial environments are addressed, particularly the role of freshwater for the biota that sustains the flow of ecosystem services and the role of the biota that modifies freshwater flows. First, the water dependence of terrestrial ecosystem sewices and food production are analyzed. Secondly, two examples of unintentional, large-scale, water-mediated cascading effects related to ecosystem services that result from local, uncoordinated decisions in Australia and South Africa are discussed These two countries are taking the lead in the management of freshwater flows and terrestrial ecosystem services. Issues including potential conflicts of interest and trade-offs between food (or timber) production and ecosystem sewices at the catchment scale are taken into account. A world-wine, intentional ecohydrological landscape approach to handle these issues is suggested. One important step towards a more integrated approach to freshwater is the development of flexible institutional structures

  • 63.
    Gordon, Line J.
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Bignet, Victoria
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Crona, Beatrice
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Stockholm Resilience Centre. The Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences, Sweden.
    Henriksson, Patrik J. G.
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Stockholm Resilience Centre. WorldFish, Penang, Malaysia.
    Van Holt, Tracy
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Stockholm Resilience Centre. The Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences, Sweden; Center for Sustainable Business, United States of America.
    Jonell, Malin
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Lindahl, Therese
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Stockholm Resilience Centre. The Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences, Sweden.
    Troell, Max
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Stockholm Resilience Centre. The Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences, Sweden.
    Barthel, Stephan
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Stockholm Resilience Centre. University of Gävle, Sweden.
    Deutsch, Lisa
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Folke, Carl
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Stockholm Resilience Centre. The Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences, Sweden.
    Haider, L. Jamila
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Rockström, Johan
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Queiroz, Cibele
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Rewiring food systems to enhance human health and biosphere stewardship2017Inngår i: Environmental Research Letters, E-ISSN 1748-9326, Vol. 12, nr 10, artikkel-id 100201Artikkel i tidsskrift (Annet vitenskapelig)
    Abstract [en]

    Food lies at the heart of both health and sustainability challenges. We use a social-ecological framework to illustrate how major changes to the volume, nutrition and safety of food systems between 1961 and today impact health and sustainability. These changes have almost halved undernutrition while doubling the proportion who are overweight. They have also resulted in reduced resilience of the biosphere, pushing four out of six analysed planetary boundaries across the safe operating space of the biosphere. Our analysis further illustrates that consumers and producers have become more distant from one another, with substantial power consolidated within a small group of key actors. Solutions include a shift from a volume-focused production system to focus on quality, nutrition, resource use efficiency, and reduced antimicrobial use. To achieve this, we need to rewire food systems in ways that enhance transparency between producers and consumers, mobilize key actors to become biosphere stewards, and re-connect people to the biosphere.

  • 64.
    Gordon, Line J.
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för systemekologi.
    Steffen, Will
    Jönsson, Bror F.
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Meteorologiska institutionen (MISU).
    Folke, Carl
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för systemekologi.
    Falkenmark, Malin
    Johannessen, Åse
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för systemekologi.
    Human modification of global water vapor flows from the land surface2005Inngår i: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, ISSN 0027-8424, E-ISSN 1091-6490, Vol. 102, nr 21, s. 7612-7617Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    It is well documented that human modification of the hydrological cycle has profoundly affected the flow of liquid water across the Earth’s land surface. Alteration of water vapor flows through land-use changes has received comparatively less attention, despite compelling evidence that such alteration can influence the functioning of the Earth System. We show that deforestation is as large a driving force as irrigation in terms of changes in the hydrological cycle. Deforestation has decreased global vapor flows from land by 4% (3,000 km3/yr), a decrease that is quantitatively as large as the increased vapor flow caused by irrigation (2,600 km3/yr). Although the net change in global vapor flows is close to zero, the spatial distributions of deforestation and irrigation are different, leading to major regional transformations of vapor-flow patterns. We analyze these changes in the light of future land-use-change projections that suggest widespread deforestation in sub-Saharan Africa and intensification of agricultural production in the Asian monsoon region. Furthermore, significant modification of vapor flows in the lands around the Indian Ocean basin will increase the risk for changes in the behavior of the Asian monsoon system. This analysis suggests that the need to increase food production in one region may affect the capability to increase food production in another. At the scale of the Earth as a whole, our results emphasize the need for climate models to take land-use change, in both land cover and irrigation, into account.

  • 65. Guerry, Anne D.
    et al.
    Polasky, Stephen
    Lubchenco, Jane
    Chaplin-Kramer, Rebecca
    Daily, Gretchen C.
    Griffin, Robert
    Ruckelshaus, Mary
    Bateman, Ian J.
    Duraiappah, Anantha
    Elmqvist, Thomas
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Feldman, Marcus W.
    Folke, Carl
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Stockholm Resilience Centre. Royal Swedish Academy of Science, Sweden.
    Hoekstra, Jon
    Kareiva, Peter M.
    Keeler, Bonnie L.
    Li, Shuzhuo
    McKenzie, Emily
    Ouyang, Zhiyun
    Reyers, Belinda
    Ricketts, Taylor H.
    Rockström, Johan
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Tallis, Heather
    Vira, Bhaskar
    Natural capital and ecosystem services informing decisions: From promise to practice2015Inngår i: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, ISSN 0027-8424, E-ISSN 1091-6490, Vol. 112, nr 24, s. 7348-7355Artikkel i tidsskrift (Annet vitenskapelig)
    Abstract [en]

    The central challenge of the 21st century is to develop economic, social, and governance systems capable of ending poverty and achieving sustainable levels of population and consumption while securing the life-support systems underpinning current and future human well-being. Essential to meeting this challenge is the incorporation of natural capital and the ecosystem services it provides into decision-making. We explore progress and crucial gaps at this frontier, reflecting upon the 10 y since the Millennium Ecosystem Assessment. We focus on three key dimensions of progress and ongoing challenges: raising awareness of the interdependence of ecosystems and human well-being, advancing the fundamental interdisciplinary science of ecosystem services, and implementing this science in decisions to restore natural capital and use it sustainably. Awareness of human dependence on nature is at an all-time high, the science of ecosystem services is rapidly advancing, and talk of natural capital is now common from governments to corporate boardrooms. However, successful implementation is still in early stages. We explore why ecosystem service information has yet to fundamentally change decision-making and suggest a path forward that emphasizes: (i) developing solid evidence linking decisions to impacts on natural capital and ecosystem services, and then to human well-being; (ii) working closely with leaders in government, business, and civil society to develop the knowledge, tools, and practices necessary to integrate natural capital and ecosystem services into everyday decision-making; and (iii) reforming institutions to change policy and practices to better align private short-term goals with societal long-term goals.

  • 66. Gunderson, L
    et al.
    Folke, Carl
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Systemekologiska institutionen.
    Looking forward, looking back2007Inngår i: Ecology and Society, Vol. 12, nr 1, s. no 32-Artikkel i tidsskrift (Annet vitenskapelig)
  • 67. Gunderson, L.
    et al.
    Folke, Carl
    Stockholms universitet, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
     Lumpy Information.2009Inngår i: Ecology & Society, E-ISSN 1708-3087, Vol. 14, nr 1, s. Article number 51-Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
  • 68. Gunderson, Lance
    et al.
    Folke, Carl
    Stockholms universitet, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Resilience 2011: Leading Transformational Change2011Inngår i: Ecology & Society, E-ISSN 1708-3087, Vol. 16, nr 2, s. 30-Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Fulltekst (pdf)
    Recilience..
  • 69.
    Gunderson, Lance
    et al.
    Emory University, USA.
    Folke, Carl
    Stockholms universitet, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Tricky Times2011Inngår i: Ecology and society, Vol. 16, nr 4, s. 31-Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    In many ways, the year 2011 has been extraordinary in terms of the frequency and scales of crises. We have seen exogenous environmental events such as the tsunami in the Pacific to floods in Brazil, Thailand, and the Philippines to cyclones in the heartland of the United States resulting in massive loss of lives and property. These variations in weather have not been unusual in their occurrence, but have been unusual in their impact to the human systems. In other words, these events have tested the resiliency of humans and their infrastructure. The other type of crises has been largely endogenous, namely social unrest, led by technologies that have created more connectivity, witnessed in the Arab Spring and continued with the Occupy movement. Although the longer term results are still uncertain, there can be little denying that the past year has been one of dramatic changes. The financial crisis still remains and there is overspending in many countries challenging collaborations of whole regions, like Europe. Understanding the linkages between the natural and human systems is a key theme of this journal. The journal also publishes work that attempts to explain abrupt and surprising change and how periods of gradual change can be prepared for or overwhelmed by external events. Much of resilience theory is about explaining shifts in controlling variables, whether they are ecological or social and interacting. To understand such shifts either in theory or in practice, as we are observing this year, involves questioning the extant boundaries and the processes that determine those boundaries. But this is where it gets tricky. Over long histories and through many cultures, humans have developed stories about key individuals, both real and imagined, who play critical roles transforming systems after crises. One such group is called tricksters because of their unexpected and surprising behaviors. Such individuals test existing boundaries and rules, but with positive results. These tricksters are so common that the myths appear universal. Native Americans personified these traits in the spirits of coyotes and ravens. One Greek myth had Prometheus steal fire from the gods, which has become a metaphor for the development and application of technology by humans. In more modern settings, the groups such as Ken Kesey and the Merry Pranksters started a cultural revolution against the mores of the early 1960s in the United States. Lisbeth Salander, the heroine of Stieg Larsson’s Girl with the Dragon Tattoo trilogy, is one of the more recent stories depicting such roles in fiction. We emphasize the creative roles of tricksters in questioning boundaries and producing positive outcomes, and not the mean and malicious sides of such actions. Their ability to innovate and find clever paths while navigating complex problems is a trait that is similar to the scholars that contribute to this journal. The intelligent, skillful, creative, and positive attributes characterize much of the scholarship within this issue, as described in the next section. 

  • 70.
    Hahn, T.
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Schultz, Lisen
    Stockholms universitet, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Folke, C.
    Stockholms universitet, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Olsson, P.
    Stockholms universitet, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Social Networks as Sources of Resilience in Social-Ecological Systems2008Inngår i: Complexity science for a sustainable future, Princeton University Press , 2008Kapittel i bok, del av antologi (Annet (populærvitenskap, debatt, mm))
  • 71.
    Hahn, Thomas
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Sioen, Giles B.
    Gasparatos, Alexandros
    Elmqvist, Thomas
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Brondizio, Eduardo
    Gómez-Baggethun, Erik
    Folke, Carl
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Stockholm Resilience Centre. Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences, Sweden.
    Setiawati, Martiwi Diah
    Atmaja, Tri
    Arini, Enggar Yustisi
    Jarzebski, Marcin Pawel
    Fukushi, Kensuke
    Takeuchi, Kazuhiko
    Insurance value of biodiversity in the Anthropocene is the full resilience value2023Inngår i: Ecological Economics, ISSN 0921-8009, E-ISSN 1873-6106, Vol. 208, artikkel-id 107799Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Recently two distinctly different conceptualisations of insurance value of biodiversity/ ecosystems have been developed. The ecosystem framing addresses the full resilience value without singling out subjective risk pref-erences. Conversely, the economic framing focuses exactly on this subjective value of risk aversion, implying that the insurance value is zero for risk neutral persons. Here we analyse the differences conceptually and empirically, and relate this to the broader socio-cultural dimensions of social-ecological resilience. The uncertainty of the Anthropocene blurs the distinction between subjective/objective. We show that the economic framing has been operationalised only in specific cases while the broader literature on resilience, disaster risk reduction, and nature-based solutions tend to address the full value of resilience. Yet, the empirical literature that relates to insurance value of biodiversity is hardly consistent with resilience theory because the slow underlying variables defining resilience are rarely addressed. We suggest how the empirical literature on insurance value can be better aligned with resilience theory. Since the ecosystem framing of insurance value captures the essence of the resilience, we propose using the concept resilience value as it may reduce the present ambiguity in terminology and conceptualisation of insurance value of biodiversity.

  • 72.
    Haider, L. Jamila
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Schlüter, Maja
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Folke, Carl
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Stockholm Resilience Centre. The Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences, Sweden.
    Reyers, Belinda
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Stockholm Resilience Centre. University of Pretoria, South Africa.
    Rethinking resilience and development: A coevolutionary perspective2021Inngår i: Ambio, ISSN 0044-7447, E-ISSN 1654-7209, Vol. 50, s. 1304-1312Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    The interdependence of social and ecological processes is broadly acknowledged in the pursuit to enhance human wellbeing and prosperity for all. Yet, development interventions continue to prioritise economic development and short-term goals with little consideration of social-ecological interdependencies, ultimately undermining resilience and therefore efforts to deliver development outcomes. We propose and advance a coevolutionary perspective for rethinking development and its relationship to resilience. The perspective rests on three propositions: (1) social-ecological relationships coevolve through processes of variation, selection and retention, which are manifest in practices; (2) resilience is the capacity to filter practices (i.e. to influence what is selected and retained); and (3) development is a coevolutionary process shaping pathways of persistence, adaptation or transformation. Development interventions affect and are affected by social-ecological relationships and their coevolutionary dynamics, with consequences for resilience, often with perverse outcomes. A coevolutionary approach enables development interventions to better consider social-ecological interdependencies and dynamics. Adopting a coevolutionary perspective, which we illustrate with a case on agricultural biodiversity, encourages a radical rethinking of how resilience and development are conceptualised and practiced across global to local scales.

  • 73. Herrfahrdt-Pähle, Elke
    et al.
    Schlüter, Maja
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Olsson, Per
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Folke, Carl
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Stockholm Resilience Centre. Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences, Sweden.
    Gelcich, Stefan
    Pahl-Wostl, Claudia
    Sustainability transformations: socio-political shocks as opportunities for governance transitions2020Inngår i: Global Environmental Change, ISSN 0959-3780, E-ISSN 1872-9495, Vol. 63, artikkel-id 102097Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Faced with accelerating environmental challenges, research on social-ecological systems is increasingly focused on the need for transformative change towards sustainable stewardship of natural resources. This paper analyses the potential of rapid, large-scale socio-political change as a window of opportunity for transformative change of natural resources governance. We hypothesize that shocks at higher levels of social organization may open up opportunities for transformation of social-ecological systems into new pathways of development. However, opportunities need to be carefully navigated otherwise transformations may stall or lead the social-ecological system in undesirable directions. We investigate (i) under which circumstances socio-political change has been used by actors as a window of opportunity for initiating transformation towards sustainable natural resource governance, (ii) how the different levels of the systems (landscape, regime and niche) interact to pave the way for initiating such transformations and (iii) which key features (cognitive, structural and agency-related) get mobilized for transformation. This is achieved through analyzing natural resource governance regimes of countries that have been subject to rapid, large-scale political change: water governance in South Africa and Uzbekistan and governance of coastal fisheries in Chile. In South Africa the political and economic change of the end of the apartheid regime resulted in a transformation of the water governance regime while in Uzbekistan after the breakdown of the Soviet Union change both at the economic and political scales and within the water governance regime remained superficial. In Chile the democratization process after the Pinochet era was used to transform the governance of coastal fisheries. The paper concludes with important insight on key capacities needed to navigate transformation towards biosphere stewardship. The study also contributes to a more nuanced view on the relationship between collapse and renewal.

  • 74. Homer-Dixon, Thomas
    et al.
    Walker, Brian
    Biggs, Reinette
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Stockholm Resilience Centre. Stellenbosch University, South Africa.
    Crépin, Anne-Sophie
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Stockholm Resilience Centre. Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences, Sweden.
    Folke, Carl
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Stockholm Resilience Centre. Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences, Sweden.
    Lambin, Eric F.
    Peterson, Garry D.
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Rockström, Johan
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Scheffer, Marten
    Steffen, Will
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Stockholm Resilience Centre. Australian National University, Australia.
    Troell, Max
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Stockholm Resilience Centre. Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences, Sweden.
    Synchronous failure: the emerging causal architecture of global crisis2015Inngår i: Ecology & Society, E-ISSN 1708-3087, Vol. 20, nr 3, artikkel-id 6Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Recent global crises reveal an emerging pattern of causation that could increasingly characterize the birth and progress of future global crises. A conceptual framework identifies this pattern's deep causes, intermediate processes, and ultimate outcomes. The framework shows how multiple stresses can interact within a single social-ecological system to cause a shift in that system's behavior, how simultaneous shifts of this kind in several largely discrete social-ecological systems can interact to cause a far larger intersystemic crisis, and how such a larger crisis can then rapidly propagate across multiple system boundaries to the global scale. Case studies of the 2008-2009 financial-energy and food-energy crises illustrate the framework. Suggestions are offered for future research to explore further the framework's propositions.

  • 75. Hughes, TP
    et al.
    Bellwood, DR
    Folke, Carl
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Systemekologiska institutionen.
    McCook, LJ
    Pandolfi, JM
    No-take areas, herbivory and coral reef resilience2007Inngår i: Trends in Ecology and Evolution, Vol. 22, nr 1, s. 1-3Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
  • 76. Hughes, TP
    et al.
    Gunderson, LH
    Folke, Carl
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Systemekologiska institutionen.
    Baird, AH
    Bellwood, D
    Berkes, F
    Crona, Beatrice
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Systemekologiska institutionen.
    Helfgott, A
    Leslie, H
    Norberg, Jon
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Systemekologiska institutionen.
    Nyström, Magnus
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Systemekologiska institutionen.
    Olsson, Per
    Övriga enheter, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Österblom, Henrik
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Systemekologiska institutionen.
    Scheffer, M
    Schuttenberg, H
    Adaptive management of the Great Barrier Reef and the Grand Canyon world heritage areas2007Inngår i: Ambio, Vol. 36, nr 7, s. 586-592Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
  • 77. Keys, Patrick W.
    et al.
    Galaz, Victor
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Stockholm Resilience Centre. Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences, Sweden.
    Dyer, Michelle
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Matthews, Nathanial
    Folke, Carl
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Stockholm Resilience Centre. Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences, Sweden.
    Nyström, Magnus
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Cornell, Sarah E.
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Anthropocene risk2019Inngår i: Nature Sustainability, ISSN 2398-9629, Vol. 2, nr 8, s. 667-673Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    The potential consequences of cross-scale systemic environmental risks with global effects are increasing. We argue that current descriptions of globally connected systemic risk poorly capture the role of human-environment interactions. This creates a bias towards solutions that ignore the new realities of the Anthropocene. We develop an integrated concept of what we denote Anthropocene risk-that is, risks that: emerge from human-driven processes; interact with global social-ecological connectivity; and exhibit complex, cross-scale relationships. To illustrate this, we use four cases: moisture recycling teleconnections, aquaculture and stranded assets, biome migration in the Sahel, and sea-level rise and megacities. We discuss the implications of Anthropocene risk across several research frontiers, particularly in the context of supranational power, environmental and social externalities and possible future Anthropocene risk governance. We conclude that decision makers must navigate this new epoch with new tools, and that Anthropocene risk contributes conceptual guidance towards a more sustainable and just future.

  • 78. Keys, Patrick W.
    et al.
    Wang-Erlandsson, Lan
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Moore, Michele-Lee
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Pranindita, Agnes
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Stenzel, Fabian
    Varis, Olli
    Warrier, Rekha
    Wong, R. Bin
    D'Odorico, Paolo
    Folke, Carl
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Stockholm Resilience Centre. Beijer Institute of Ecological Economics, Sweden.
    The dry sky: future scenarios for humanity's modification of the atmospheric water cycle2024Inngår i: Global Sustainability, E-ISSN 2059-4798, Vol. 7, artikkel-id e11Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Non-Technical Summary. Human societies are changing where and how water flows through the atmosphere. However, these changes in the atmospheric water cycle are not being managed, nor is there any real sense of where these changes might be headed in the future. Thus, we develop a new economic theory of atmospheric water management, and explore this theory using creative story-based scenarios. These scenarios reveal surprising possibilities for the future of atmospheric water management, ranging from a stock market for transpiration to on-demand weather. We discuss these story-based futures in the context of research and policy priorities in the present day.

    Technical Summary. Humanity is modifying the atmospheric water cycle, via land use, climate change, air pollution, and weather modification. Historically, atmospheric water was implicitly considered a ‘public good’ since it was neither actively consumed nor controlled. However, given anthropogenic changes, atmospheric water can become a ‘common-pool’ good (consumable) or a ‘club’ good (controllable). Moreover, advancements in weather modification presage water becoming a ‘private’ good, meaning both consumable and controllable. Given the implications, we designed a theoretical framing of atmospheric water as an economic good and used a combination of methods in order to explore possible future scenarios based on human modifications of the atmospheric water cycle. First, a systematic literature search of scholarly abstracts was used in a computational text analysis. Second, the output of the text analysis was matched to different parts of an existing economic goods framework. Then, a group of global water experts were trained and developed story-based scenarios. The resultant scenarios serve as creative investigations of the future of human modification of the atmospheric water cycle. We discuss how the scenarios can enhance anticipatory capacity in the context of both future research frontiers and potential policy pathways including transboundary governance, finance, and resource management.

    Social Media Summary. Story-based scenarios reveal novel future pathways for the management of the atmospheric water cycle.

  • 79. Levin, Simon A.
    et al.
    Anderies, John M.
    Adger, Neil
    Barrett, Scott
    Bennett, Elena M.
    Cardenas, Juan Camilo
    Carpenter, Stephen R.
    Crépin, Anne-Sophie
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Stockholm Resilience Centre. Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences, Sweden.
    Ehrlich, Paul
    Fischer, Joern
    Folke, Carl
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Stockholm Resilience Centre. Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences, Sweden.
    Kautsky, Nils
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för ekologi, miljö och botanik.
    Kling, Catherine
    Nyborg, Karine
    Polasky, Stephen
    Scheffer, Marten
    Segerson, Kathleen
    Shogren, Jason
    van den Bergh, Jeroen
    Walker, Brian
    Weber, Elke U.
    Wilen, James
    Governance in the Face of Extreme Events: Lessons from Evolutionary Processes for Structuring Interventions, and the Need to Go Beyond2022Inngår i: Ecosystems (New York. Print), ISSN 1432-9840, E-ISSN 1435-0629, Vol. 25, nr 3, s. 697-711Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    The increasing frequency of extreme events, exogenous and endogenous, poses challenges for our societies. The current pandemic is a case in point; but once-in-a-century weather events are also becoming more common, leading to erosion, wildfire and even volcanic events that change ecosystems and disturbance regimes, threaten the sustainability of our life-support systems, and challenge the robustness and resilience of societies. Dealing with extremes will require new approaches and large-scale collective action. Preemptive measures can increase general resilience, a first line of protection, while more specific reactive responses are developed. Preemptive measures also can minimize the negative effects of events that cannot be avoided. In this paper, we first explore approaches to prevention, mitigation and adaptation, drawing inspiration from how evolutionary challenges have made biological systems robust and resilient, and from the general theory of complex adaptive systems. We argue further that proactive steps that go beyond will be necessary to reduce unacceptable consequences.

  • 80. Li, Chuan-Zhong
    et al.
    Crepin, Anne-Sophie
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Stockholm Resilience Centre. Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences, Sweden.
    Folke, Carl
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Stockholm Resilience Centre. Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences, Sweden.
    The Economics of Resilience2017Inngår i: International Review of Environmental and Resource Economics, ISSN 1932-1465, E-ISSN 1932-1473, Vol. 11, nr 4, s. 309-353Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper provides an interpretive overview on the economics of resilience with special reference to social-ecological systems. We address the basic sciences of regime shifts and resilience in different settings linked to empirical cases and review the economic models related to these aspects. In particular we discuss models to assess market outcomes when thresholds exist and are known and particular characteristics of such systems when they are optimally managed. We also examine multiple aspects of uncertainty including unknown but learnable thresholds and systems where either the threshold or the stock dynamics are uncertain because they change in a stochastic way. Moreover, we discuss resilience in relation to measurement and valuation using approaches that focus on the role of biodiversity for resilience, the insurance value of resilience and the value of resilience as a stock that influences social welfare. Finally, we discuss issues related to practical resilience management and identify knowledge gaps that future research efforts could address.

  • 81. Liu, J
    et al.
    Dietz, T
    Carpenter, SR
    Alberti, M
    Folke, Carl
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Systemekologiska institutionen.
    Moran, E
    Pell, AN
    Deadman, P
    Kratz, T
    Lubchenko, J
    Ostrom, E
    Ouyang, Z
    Provencher, W
    Redman, CL
    Scneider, SH
    Taylor, WW
    Complexity of coupled human and natural systems2007Inngår i: Science, Vol. 317, s. 1513-1516Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
  • 82. Liu, J
    et al.
    Dietz, T
    Carpenter, SR
    Folke, Carl
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Systemekologiska institutionen.
    Alberti, M
    Redman, CL
    Schneider, SH
    Ostrom, E
    Pell, AN
    Lubchenco, J
    Taylor, WW
    Ouyang, Z
    Deadman, P
    Kratz, T
    Provencher, W
    Coupled human and natural systems2007Inngår i: Ambio, Vol. 36, nr 8, s. 639-649Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
  • 83.
    Lokrantz, Jerker
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Systemekologiska institutionen.
    Nyström, Magnus
    Stockholms universitet, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Norström, Albert V.
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Systemekologiska institutionen.
    Folke, Carl
    Stockholms universitet, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Cinner, Joshua E.
    ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies, James Cook University.
    Impacts of artisanal fishing on key functional groups and the potential vulnerability of coral reefs2010Inngår i: Environmental Conservation, ISSN 0376-8929, E-ISSN 1469-4387, Vol. 36, nr 4, s. 327-337Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Fishing can have major impacts on the structure of coral reef ecosystems. Overfishing of herbivores is particularly detrimental, as it makes the coral system more likely to undergo shifts to macroalgal dominance in the event of coral mass mortality. Knowing when important processes, such as herbivory, are becoming brittle is important because it can provide an opportunity for managers to avoid undesirable ecosystem-level changes. This study investigates the impact of artisanal fishing on three important functional groups of herbivores (grazers, scrapers and excavators) on five coral-dominated reefs outside Zanzibar (Tanzania). There was a negative correlation between fishing pressure and fish biomass, abundance, diversity and species richness. Moreover, fishing had a negative influence on the demographic structure of functional groups, particularly excavators, manifesting itself as a skewness towards smaller individuals within populations. Artisanal fishing can have significant impacts on key functional groups of herbivorous reef fishes which may increase the vulnerability of coral reefs to undesirable ecosystem shifts.

  • 84.
    Masterson, Vanessa
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Tengö, Maria
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Spierenburg, Marja
    Folke, Carl
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Culture and development: social-ecological dynamics in the former Transkei, South AfricaManuskript (preprint) (Annet vitenskapelig)
  • 85. Mathevet, Raphaël
    et al.
    Thompson, John D.
    Folke, Carl
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Stockholm Resilience Centre. Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences, Sweden.
    Chapin, F. Stuart
    Protected areas and their surrounding territory: socioecological systems in the context of ecological solidarity2016Inngår i: Ecological Applications, ISSN 1051-0761, E-ISSN 1939-5582, Vol. 26, nr 1, s. 5-16Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    The concept of ecological solidarity (ES) is a major feature of the 2006 law reforming national park policy in France. In the context of biodiversity conservation, the objectives of this study are to outline the historical development of ES, provide a working defi nition, and present a method for its implementation that combines environmental pragmatism and adaptive management. First, we highlight how ES provides a focus on the interdependencies among humans and nonhuman components of the socioecological system. In doing so, we identify ES within a framework that distinguishes ecological, socioecological, and sociopolitical interdependencies. In making such interdependencies apparent to humans who are not aware of their existence, the concept of ES promotes collective action as an alternative or complementary approach to state-or market-based approaches. By focusing on the awareness, feelings, and acknowledgement of interdependencies between actors and between humans and nonhumans, we present and discuss a learning-based approach (participatory modeling) that allows stakeholders to work together to construct cultural landscapes for present and future generations. Using two case studies, we show how an ES analysis goes beyond the ecosystem management approach to take into account how human interactions with the environment embody cultural, social, and economic values and endorse an ethically integrated science of care and responsibility. ES recognizes the diversity of these values as a practical foundation for socially engaged and accountable actions. Finally, we discuss how ES enhances academic support for a socioecological systems approach to biodiversity conservation and promotes collaboration with decision-makers and stakeholders involved in the adaptive management of protected areas and their surrounding landscapes.

  • 86. Miller, Fiona
    et al.
    Osbahr, Henny
    Boyd, Emily
    Stockholms universitet, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Thomalla, Frank
    Stockholms universitet, Stockholm Resilience Centre, Stockholm Environment Institute.
    Bharwani, Sukaina
    Stockholms universitet, Stockholm Resilience Centre, Stockholm Environment Institute.
    Ziervogel, Gina
    Stockholms universitet, Stockholm Resilience Centre, Stockholm Environment Institute.
    Walker, Brian
    Stockholms universitet, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Birkmann, Joern
    van der Leeuw, Sander
    Rockström, Johan
    Stockholms universitet, Stockholm Resilience Centre, Stockholm Environment Institute.
    Hinkel, Jochen
    Downing, Tom
    Stockholms universitet, Stockholm Resilience Centre, Stockholm Environment Institute.
    Folke, Carl
    Stockholms universitet, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Nelson, Donald
    Resilience and vulnerability: complementary or conflicting concepts?2010Inngår i: Ecology & Society, E-ISSN 1708-3087, Vol. 15, nr 3, s. 11-Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Resilience and vulnerability represent two related yet different approaches to understanding the response of systems and actors to change; to shocks and surprises, as well as slow creeping changes. Their respective origins in ecological and social theory largely explain the continuing differences in approach to social-ecological dimensions of change. However, there are many areas of strong convergence. This paper explores the emerging linkages and complementarities between the concepts of resilience and vulnerability to identify areas of synergy. We do this with regard to theory, methodology, and application. The paper seeks to go beyond just recognizing the complementarities between the two approaches to demonstrate how researchers are actively engaging with each field to coproduce new knowledge, and to suggest promising areas of complementarity that are likely to further research and action in the field.

  • 87. Nielsen, K. S.
    et al.
    Stern, P. C.
    Dietz, T.
    Gilligan, J. M.
    van Vuuren, D. P.
    Figueroa, M. J.
    Folke, Carl
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Stockholm Resilience Centre. Beijer Institute of Ecological Economics, Sweden; Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences, Sweden.
    Gwozdz, W.
    Ivanova, D.
    Reisch, L. A.
    Vandenbergh, M. P.
    Wolske, K. S.
    Wood, R.
    Improving Climate Change Mitigation Analysis: A Framework for Examining Feasibility2020Inngår i: One Earth, ISSN 2590-3330, E-ISSN 2590-3322, Vol. 3, nr 3, s. 325-336Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Limiting global warming to 2°C or less compared with pre-industrial temperatures will require unprecedented rates of decarbonization globally. The scale and scope of transformational change required across sectors and actors in society raises critical questions of feasibility. Much of the literature on mitigation pathways addresses technological and economic aspects of feasibility, but overlooks the behavioral, cultural, and social factors that affect theoretical and practical mitigation pathways. We present a tripartite framework that “unpacks” the concept of mitigation pathways by distinguishing three factors that together determine actual mitigation: technical potential, initiative feasibility, and behavioral plasticity. The framework aims to integrate and streamline heterogeneous disciplinary research traditions toward a more comprehensive and transparent approach that will facilitate learning across disciplines and enable mitigation pathways to more fully reflect available knowledge. We offer three suggestions for integrating the tripartite framework into current research on climate change mitigation.

  • 88.
    Norström, Albert
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Cvitanovic, Christopher
    Löf, Marie F.
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Stockholms universitets Östersjöcentrum.
    West, Simon
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Stockholm Resilience Centre. Australian National University, Australia; Charles Darwin University, Australia.
    Wyborn, Carina
    Balvanera, Patricia
    Bednarek, Angela T.
    Bennett, Elena M.
    Biggs, Reinette
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Stockholm Resilience Centre. Stellenbosch University, South Africa.
    de Bremond, Ariane
    Campbell, Bruce M.
    Canadell, Josep G.
    Carpenter, Stephen R.
    Folke, Carl
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Stockholm Resilience Centre. Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences, Sweden.
    Fulton, Elizabeth A.
    Gaffney, Owen
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Stockholm Resilience Centre. Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research, Germany.
    Gelcich, Stefan
    Jouffray, Jean-Baptiste
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Stockholm Resilience Centre. Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences, Sweden.
    Leach, Melissa
    Le Tissier, Martin
    Martin-López, Berta
    Louder, Elena
    Loutre, Marie-France
    Meadow, Alison M.
    Nagendra, Harini
    Payne, Davnah
    Peterson, Garry D.
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Reyers, Belinda
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Stockholm Resilience Centre. Stellenbosch University, South Africa.
    Scholes, Robert
    Speranza, Chinwe Ifejika
    Spierenburg, Marja
    Stafford-Smith, Mark
    Tengö, Maria
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    van der Hel, Sandra
    van Putten, Ingrid
    Österblom, Henrik
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Principles for knowledge co-production in sustainability research2020Inngår i: Nature Sustainability, E-ISSN 2398-9629, Vol. 3, nr 3, s. 182-190Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Research practice, funding agencies and global science organizations suggest that research aimed at addressing sustainability challenges is most effective when 'co-produced' by academics and non-academics. Co-production promises to address the complex nature of contemporary sustainability challenges better than more traditional scientific approaches. But definitions of knowledge co-production are diverse and often contradictory. We propose a set of four general principles that underlie high-quality knowledge co-production for sustainability research. Using these principles, we offer practical guidance on how to engage in meaningful co-productive practices, and how to evaluate their quality and success. Research addressing sustainability issues is more effective if 'co-produced' by academics and non-academics, but definitions of co-production vary. This Perspective presents four knowledge co-production principles for sustainability research and guides on how to engage in co-productive practices.

  • 89.
    Norström, Albert V.
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Agarwal, Bina
    Balvanera, Patricia
    Baptiste, Brigitte
    Bennett, Elena M.
    Brondízio, Eduardo
    Biggs, Reinette
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Stockholm Resilience Centre. Stellenbosch University, South Africa.
    Campbell, Bruce
    Carpenter, Stephen R.
    Castilla, Juan Carlos
    Castro, Antonio J.
    Cramer, Wolfgang
    Cumming, Graeme S.
    Felipe-Lucia, María
    Fischer, Joern
    Folke, Carl
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Stockholm Resilience Centre. Columbia University, USA; Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile, Chile.
    DeFries, Ruth
    Gelcich, Stefan
    Groth, Juliane
    Speranza, Chinwe Ifejika
    Jacobs, Sander
    Hofmann, Johanna
    Hughes, Terry P.
    Lam, David P. M.
    Loos, Jacqueline
    Manyani, Amanda
    Martín-López, Berta
    Meacham, Megan
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Moersberger, Hannah
    Nagendra, Harini
    Pereira, Laura
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Stockholm Resilience Centre. Belgian Biodiversity Platform, Belgium.
    Polasky, Stephen
    Schoon, Michael
    Schultz, Lisen
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Selomane, Odirilwe
    Spierenburg, Marja
    The programme on ecosystem change and society (PECS) - a decade of deepening social-ecological research through a place-based focus2022Inngår i: Ecosystems and People, ISSN 2639-5908, E-ISSN 2639-5916, Vol. 18, nr 1, s. 598-608Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    The Programme on Ecosystem Change and Society (PECS) was established in 2011, and is now one of the major international social-ecological systems (SES) research networks. During this time, SES research has undergone a phase of rapid growth and has grown into an influential branch of sustainability science. In this Perspective, we argue that SES research has also deepened over the past decade, and helped to shed light on key dimensions of SES dynamics (e.g. system feedbacks, aspects of system design, goals and paradigms) that can lead to tangible action for solving the major sustainability challenges of our time. We suggest four ways in which the growth of place-based SES research, fostered by networks such as PECS, has contributed to these developments, namely by: 1) shedding light on transformational change, 2) revealing the social dynamics shaping SES, 3) bringing together diverse types of knowledge, and 4) encouraging reflexive researchers.

  • 90.
    Norström, Albert V.
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Nyström, Magnus
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Jouffray, Jean-Baptiste
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Stockholm Resilience Centre. Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences, Sweden.
    Folke, Carl
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Stockholm Resilience Centre. Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences, Sweden.
    Graham, Nicholas A. J.
    Moberg, Fredrik
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Olsson, Per
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Williams, Gareth J.
    Guiding coral reef futures in the Anthropocene2016Inngår i: Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment, ISSN 1540-9295, E-ISSN 1540-9309, Vol. 14, nr 9, s. 490-498Artikkel, forskningsoversikt (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Anthropogenic changes to the Earth now rival those caused by the forces of nature and have shepherded us into a new planetary epoch - the Anthropocene. Such changes include profound and often unexpected alterations to coral reef ecosystems and the services they provide to human societies. Ensuring that reefs and their services endure during the Anthropocene will require that key drivers of coral reef change fishing, water quality, and anthropogenic climate change - stay within acceptable levels or safe operating spaces. The capacity to remain within these safe boundaries hinges on understanding the local, but also the increasingly global and cross-scale, socioeconomic causes of these human drivers of change. Consequently, local and regional management efforts that are successful in the short term may ultimately fail if current decision making and institution-building around coral reef systems remains fragmented, poorly coordinated, and unable to keep pace with the escalating speed of social, technological, and ecological change.

  • 91.
    Norström, Albert V.
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Systemekologiska institutionen. Stockholms universitet, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Nyström, Magnus
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Systemekologiska institutionen. Stockholms universitet, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Lokrantz, Jerker
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Systemekologiska institutionen. Stockholms universitet, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Folke, Carl
    Stockholms universitet, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Alternative states on coral reefs: beyond coral-macroalgal phase shifts2009Inngår i: Marine Ecology Progress Series, ISSN 0171-8630, E-ISSN 1616-1599, Vol. 376, s. 295-306Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Degradation of coral reefs is often associated with changes in community structure where macroalgae become the dominant benthic life form. These phase shifts can be difficult to reverse. The debate on coral reef phase shifts has not focused on reports of coral reefs becoming dominated by other life forms following disturbance. A review of the primary and grey literature indicates that reefs dominated by corallimorpharia, soft corals, sponges and sea urchins can enter an alternative state as a result of a phase shift. Shifts can be triggered by pulse disturbances that cause large-scale coral mortality, and may become stable as a result of positive feedback mechanisms. However, they may differ from the archetypical coral-macroalgae shift, depending on the factors driving the shift; whereas coral-macroalgae and coral-urchin shifts seem to be driven by loss of top-down control through overfishing, shifts to corallimorpharian, soft coral and sponge dominance seem more associated with changes in bottom-tip dynamics. Understanding the differences and similarities in mechanisms that cause and maintain this variety of alternative states will aid management aimed at preventing and reversing phase shifts of coral reefs.

  • 92.
    Nyström, Magnus
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Jouffray, Jean-Baptiste
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Stockholm Resilience Centre. Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences, Sweden.
    Norström, Albert V.
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Crona, Beatrice
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Stockholm Resilience Centre. Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences, Sweden.
    Søgaard Jørgensen, Peter
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Stockholm Resilience Centre. Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences, Sweden.
    Carpenter, S. R.
    Bodin, Örjan
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Galaz, Victor
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Stockholm Resilience Centre. Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences, Sweden.
    Folke, Carl
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Stockholm Resilience Centre. Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences, Sweden.
    Anatomy and resilience of the global production ecosystem2019Inngår i: Nature, ISSN 0028-0836, E-ISSN 1476-4687, Vol. 575, s. 98-108Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Much of the Earth's biosphere has been appropriated for the production of harvestable biomass in the form of food, fuel and fibre. Here we show that the simplification and intensification of these systems and their growing connection to international markets has yielded a global production ecosystem that is homogenous, highly connected and characterized by weakened internal feedbacks. We argue that these features converge to yield high and predictable supplies of biomass in the short term, but create conditions for novel and pervasive risks to emerge and interact in the longer term. Steering the global production ecosystem towards a sustainable trajectory will require the redirection of finance, increased transparency and traceability in supply chains, and the participation of a multitude of players, including integrated 'keystone actors' such as multinational corporations.

  • 93.
    Nyström, Magnus
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Systemekologiska institutionen.
    Norström, Albert
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Systemekologiska institutionen.
    Bleckner, Thorsten
    Stockholms universitet, Stockholm Resilience Centre, Baltic Nest Institute.
    de la Torre Castro, Maricela
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Systemekologiska institutionen.
    Eklöf, Johan
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Systemekologiska institutionen.
    Folke, Carl
    Stockholms universitet, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Österblom, Henrik
    Stockholms universitet, Stockholm Resilience Centre, Baltic Nest Institute.
    Steneck, Robert
    School of Marine Sciences, University of Maine.
    Thyresson, Matilda
    Troell, Max
    The Beijer Institute, the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences.
    Steering feedbacks toward healthier marine ecosystemsManuskript (preprint) (Annet vitenskapelig)
    Abstract [en]

    Marine ecosystem decline is accelerating. At some point degradation may pass a tipping point beyond which ecosystems become trapped in alternative degraded states, as a result of changes in critical feedbacks. Self-reinforcing feedbacks pose a major challenge for managers and policy-makers seeking remedial actions to curb the marine crisis. Here we synthesize the dynamics of critical feedbacks of the degraded states in five socio-economically important marine ecosystems; coral reefs, kelp forests, seagrass beds, shallow unvegetated soft-bottom habitats, and coastal pelagic food webs. A better understanding of the way human actions influence the strength and direction of feedbacks, how different feedbacks interact and at what scales they operate, is crucial for successful implementation of marine ecosystem management. We advocate a critical-feedback management approach that ventures beyond traditionally discipline boundaries, as an essential element of marine ecosystem management.

  • 94. O´Brien, K.
    et al.
    Patwardhan, A.
    Pelling, M.
    Biggs, Reinette
    Stockholms universitet, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Folke, Carl
    Stockholms universitet, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Toward a Sustainable and Resilient Future2011Inngår i: Special Report on Managing the Risks of Extreme Events and Disasters to Advance Climate Change Adaptation (SREX): Group II Contribution to the Fifth Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) / [ed] Christopher B. Field, Vicente Barros, Thomas F. Stocker, Qin Dahe., Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2011, s. 437-485Kapittel i bok, del av antologi (Annet vitenskapelig)
  • 95.
    Olsson, Per
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Bodin, Örjan
    Stockholms universitet, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Folke, Carl
    Stockholms universitet, Stockholm Resilience Centre. Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences, Beijer Institute.
    Building transformative capacity for ecosystem stewardship in social-ecological systems2010Inngår i: Adaptive Capacity and Environmental Governance / [ed] Armitage, D. and Plummer, R., Berlin, Heidelberg: Springer Berlin/Heidelberg, 2010, s. 263-285Kapittel i bok, del av antologi (Fagfellevurdert)
  • 96.
    Olsson, Per
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Bodin, Örjan
    Stockholms universitet, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Folke, Carl
    Stockholms universitet, Stockholm Resilience Centre. The Beijer Institute, The Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences, Sweden.
    Building transformative capacity in social-ecological systems: insights and challenges2010Inngår i: Adaptive Capacity and Environmental Governance / [ed] Derek Armitage, Ryan Plummer, Springer Berlin/Heidelberg, 2010, s. 263-285Kapittel i bok, del av antologi (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    We use a “resilience lens” to identify gaps in the understanding of capacity to transform social-ecological systems’ (SES) trajectories toward ecosystem stewardship and highlight some challenges that need to be addressed. We draw on the organizational evolution literature in combination with the latest insights on SES transformations to give a more detailed understanding of what constitute transformative capacity. Two case studies illustrate the possibilities and challenges. SES transformations require knowledge and skills that can link ecosystem and social system dynamics, and develop strategies to overcome barriers and enable institutional changes that foster transformations. We identify some criteria that seem important for developing a framework for analyzing transformations and assessing transformative capacity in social-ecological systems. These criteria include experimentation and innovation, agency and social networks, opportunity context, diversity, boundaries, and collaboration.

  • 97.