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  • 51.
    Barthel, Stephan
    Stockholms universitet, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Framtidens Albano: forskning omsatt i  praktik2010Annet (Annet vitenskapelig)
  • 52.
    Barthel, Stephan
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Colding, Johan
    Stockholms universitet, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Ernstson, Henrik
    Stockholms universitet, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Albano Resilient Campus2010Annet (Annet vitenskapelig)
  • 53.
    Barthel, Stephan
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Colding, Johan
    Stockholms universitet, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Ernstson, Henrik
    Stockholms universitet, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Eriksson, Hanna
    Stockholms universitet, Stockholm Resilience Centre, Baltic Nest Institute.
    Chans att sätta Stockholm på kartan2011Inngår i: Svenska DagbladetArtikkel i tidsskrift (Annet (populærvitenskap, debatt, mm))
    Abstract [sv]

    Så beskriver ett antal forskare från Stockholm Resilience Centre och KTH läget nu när Albano ska utvecklas till ett nytt universitetsområde. Albano kan bli en internationell förebild när det gäller hållbart byggande om politikerna tar sitt ansvar, skriver forskarna i en debattartikel i Svenska Dagbladet idag. På Stockholm Resilience Centres webbplats finns texten även på engelska.

  • 54.
    Barthel, Stephan
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Systemekologiska institutionen. Stockholms universitet, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Folke, Carl
    Stockholms universitet, Stockholm Resilience Centre. Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Systemekologiska institutionen.
    Colding, Johan
    Stockholms universitet, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Social-ecological memory in urban gardens-Retaining the capacity for management of ecosystem services2010Inngår i: Global Environmental Change, ISSN 0959-3780, E-ISSN 1872-9495, Vol. 20, nr 2, s. 255-265Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Many ecosystem services are in decline. Local ecological knowledge and associated practice are essential to sustain and enhance ecosystem services on the ground. Here, we focus on social or collective memory in relation to management practice that sustains ecosystem services, and investigate where and how ecological practices, knowledge and experience are retained and transmitted. We analyze such social-ecological memory of allotment gardens in the Stockholm urban area, Sweden. Allotment gardens support ecosystem services such as pollination, seed dispersal and pest regulation in the broader urban landscape. Surveys and interviews were preformed over a four-year period with several hundreds of gardeners. We found that the allotment gardens function as communities-of-practice, where participation and reification interact and social-ecological memory is a shared source of resilience of the community by being both emergent and persistent. Ecological practices and knowledge in allotment gardens are retained and transmitted by imitation of practices, oral communication and collective rituals and habits, as well as by the physical gardens, artifacts, metaphors and rules-in-use (institutions). Finally, a wider social context provides external support through various forms of media, markets, social networks, collaborative organizations, and legal structures. We exemplify the role of urban gardens in generating ecosystem services in times of crisis and change and conclude that stewards of urban green areas and the social memory that they carry may help counteract further decline of critical ecosystem services. .

  • 55.
    Barthel, Stephan
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Sörlin, Sverker
    Ljungkvist, John
    Innovative memory and resilient cities: echoes from ancient Constantinople2011Inngår i: The urban mind: cultural and environmental dynamics / [ed] Paul Sinclair, Frands Herschend, Christian Isendahl and Gullög Nordquist, Uppsala: Uppsala universitet, 2011, s. 391-406Kapittel i bok, del av antologi (Annet vitenskapelig)
    Abstract [en]

    This chapter uses insights from resilience thinking in analysing a two-thousand-year periodof ancient and modern Constantinople, addressing one of the great challenges of the UrbanAnthropocene: how to nurture an ecologically sound urbanisation. One of the lessons isthat Constantinople maintained a diversity of insurance strategies to a greater degree thanmany historical and contemporary urban centres. It invested heavily not only in militaryinfrastructure but also in systems for supplying, storing, and producing food and water.From major granaries and at least four harbours the citizens could receive seaborne goods,but during sieges the trade networks broke down. At those times, when supplies ran dry,there were possibilities to cultivate food within the defensive walls and to catch fish in theGolden Horn. Repeated sieges, which occurred on average every fifty years, generated adiversity of social-ecological memories – the means by which the knowledge, experience,and practice of how to manage a local ecosystem were stored and transmitted in acommunity. These memories existed in multiple groups of society, partly as a response tothe collapse of long-distance, seaborne, grain transports from Egypt. Food production andtransports were decentralized into a plethora of smaller subsistence communities (oikoi),which also sold the surplus to the markets of the city. In this way Constantinople becamemore self-reliant on regional ecosystems. An additional result was that the defensive wallswere moved, not in order to construct more buildings but to increase the proportionof gardens and agricultural land. In a comparison with Cairo, it can be seen that theseinnovations related to enhanced self-reliance in food production made it possible for392Constantinople to bounce back from extreme hardships, such as extended sieges, withoutcollapsing into chaos or moral decay. Transformed urban morphology of the city wouldsimply remind residents, through the visual presence of a living garden culture, of theimportance of the latter for food security. Without the gardens the long intervals betweensieges would probably have been enough to dissolve living memory. Hence, the urbanresilience of Constantinople was enhanced, promoting well-established old regimes andtraditions of importance for producing ecosystem services to society while at the sametime testing and refining new and successful regimes, or in other words through theinterplay of memory and innovation. Currently, and even more so in decades to come, themindsets of urban people hold power in a global arena. Questions related to how the lossof green space in metropolitan landscapes will affect worldviews are worrisome since it isthe desires and demands of urban people that will affect future decisions and essentiallydetermine the fate of the planet. People throughout the world, and not least in Westernsocieties, need to be constantly reminded of our dependence on a living planet and staymotivated to support it. Social-ecological memories related to local food production haveto be nurtured in urban landscapes as well, and an urban morphology is needed thatstrengthens ecological awareness across urban populations rather than the opposite.

  • 56. Batidzirai, B.
    et al.
    Johnson, Francis X.
    Stockholms universitet, Stockholm Resilience Centre, Stockholm Environment Institute.
    Energy security, agro-industrial development and international trade: the case of sugarcane in southern Africa2012Inngår i: Socioeconomic and Environmental Impacts of Biofuels: Evidence from Developing Nations / [ed] Alexandros Gasparatos and Per Stromberg, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2012, s. 254-277Kapittel i bok, del av antologi (Annet vitenskapelig)
  • 57. Bauner, David
    et al.
    Fones Sundell, Melinda
    Stockholms universitet, Stockholm Resilience Centre, Stockholm Environment Institute.
    Njau, Karoli Nicholas
    Walsh, Tom
    Cerin, Pontus
    Financing and investment for sugar cane and bioenergy in Africa2012Inngår i: Bioenergy for sustainable development and international competitiveness: the role of sugar cane in Africa / [ed] F.X. Johnson and V. Seebaluck, Routledge, 2012, s. 390-415Kapittel i bok, del av antologi (Annet vitenskapelig)
  • 58. Be, T.T.
    et al.
    Sinh, B.T.
    Miller, Fiona
    Stockholms universitet, Övriga enheter, Stockholm Resilience Centre. Stockholm Environment Institute.
    Challenging the Sustainable Development in the Mekong Delta: Regional and Regional Policy Issues and Research Needs2007Bok (Annet vitenskapelig)
  • 59.
    Beckman, J.
    Stockholms universitet, Övriga enheter, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Det institutionaliserade samlandet2008Inngår i: Signums svenska kulturhistoria, Stockholm: Atlantis förlag , 2008Kapittel i bok, del av antologi (Fagfellevurdert)
  • 60.
    Beckman, Jenny
    Stockholms universitet, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Inledning2008Inngår i: Vetenskapens sociala strukturer: Sju historiska om konflikt, samverkan och makt. / [ed] Sven Widmalm, Lund: Nordic Academic Press , 2008Kapittel i bok, del av antologi (Annet (populærvitenskap, debatt, mm))
  • 61.
    Beckman, Jenny
    Stockholms universitet, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Landskapsfloror: att inventera över gränser2008Inngår i: Vetenskapens sociala strukturer: sju historiska fallstudier om konflikt, samverkan och makt / [ed] Sven Widmalm, Lund: Nordic Academic Press , 2008, s. 219-262Kapittel i bok, del av antologi (Annet (populærvitenskap, debatt, mm))
  • 62.
    Beckman, Jenny
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Widmalm, S.
    Tunlid, A.
    Efterord2009Inngår i: Vetenskapens sociala strukturer: Sju historiska om konflikt, samverkan och makt., Lund: Nordic Academic Press , 2009Kapittel i bok, del av antologi (Annet (populærvitenskap, debatt, mm))
  • 63. Beilin, R.
    et al.
    Queiroz, Cibele
    Stockholms universitet, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Lindborg, Regina
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Systemekologiska institutionen.
    Re-imagined and re-defined meanings: The complexity of land abandonment, identity and place in the quest for sustainable and biodivers rural and regional landscapes2011Inngår i: Landscapes, identities, and development / [ed] Zoran Roca, Paul Claval, John Agnew, Ashgate, 2011, s. 243-256Kapittel i bok, del av antologi (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Bringing together theoretical and empirical research from 22 countries in Europe, North America, Australia, South America and Japan, this book offers a state-of-the-art survey of conceptual and methodological research and planning issues relating to landscape, heritage, and development. It has 30 chapters grouped in four main thematic sections: landscapes as a constitutive dimension of territorial identities; landscape history and landscape heritage; landscapes as development assets and resources; and landscape research and development planning. The contributors are scholars from a wide range of cultural and professional backgrounds, experienced in fundamental and applied research, planning and policy design. They were invited by the co-editors to write chapters for this book on the basis of the theoretical frameworks, case-study research findings and related policy concerns they presented at the 23rd Session of PECSRL - The Permanent European Conference for the Study of the Rural Landscape, organized by TERCUD - Territory, Culture and Development Research Centre, Universidade Lusofona, in Lisbon and Obidos, Portugal, 1 - 5 September 2008. With such broad inter-disciplinary relevance and international scope, this book provides a valuable overview, highlighting recent findings and interpretations on historical, current and prospective linkages between changing landscapes and natural, economic, cultural and other identity features of places and regions; landscape-related identities as local and regional development assets and resources in the era of globalized economy and culture; the role of landscape history and heritage as platforms of landscape research and management in European contexts, including the implementation of The European Landscape Convention; and, the strengthening of the landscape perspective as a constitutive element of sustainable development.

  • 64.
    Bendt, Pim
    Stockholms universitet, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Social Learning and Diversity of Practice in Community Gardens in Berlin2010Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 40 poäng / 60 hpOppgave
    Abstract [en]

    Genuine advancement towards sustainable development requires broad-based popular supportfor prioritising the environment in our pursuit of social and economic progress. Since citieshave become the dominant human habitat of the century, it is especially critical that urbanpopulations adopt such sentiments. Yet, rapid urbanisation is severing perceived andexperienced links between people and nature, engendering an ‘extinction-of-experience’ asmodern life-styles are adopted and we cease to depend on local resources.Interdisciplinary perspectives on social learning suggest that communities that practicallyengage with nature constitute key forums for the creation and storage of knowledge andexperiences.This study goes further by investigating social learning and practice in locally managed greenareas which are also open to the public, in order to explore their capacity to nurtureexperienced based learning among wider sets of urban citizens. Extensive participatoryobservation and in-depth interviews have been conducted in a number of community gardensin Berlin over a period of 6 months.Findings show that community gardens support institutionally diverse sets of locally anchoredcommunities-of-practice where experienced based learning about nature is generated andstored.. Interestingly, local practice also nurtured experienced based learning about social,political and economic dimensions of life in the city.It is suggested that such open and experimental form of green area management hold promisefor tackling extinction-of-experience among the distinctively heterogeneous urbanpopulations of today. It also contends that community gardens foster progress towardssustainability on the local level through intertwining ecological and social concerns inlearning and practice on the ground.

  • 65. Bennett, Elena M.
    et al.
    Peterson, Garry D.
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för naturgeografi och kvartärgeologi (INK). Stockholms universitet, Stockholm Resilience Centre. McGill University, Canada.
    Gordon, Line J.
    Stockholms universitet, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Understanding relationships among multiple ecosystem services.2009Inngår i: Ecology Letters, ISSN 1461-023X, E-ISSN 1461-0248, Vol. 12, nr 12, s. 1394-1404Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Ecosystem management that attempts to maximize the production of one ecosystem service often results in substantial declines in the provision of other ecosystem services. For this reason, recent studies have called for increased attention to development of a theoretical understanding behind the relationships among ecosystem services. Here, we review the literature on ecosystem services and propose a typology of relationships between ecosystem services based on the role of drivers and the interactions between services. We use this typology to develop three propositions to help drive ecological science towards a better understanding of the relationships among multiple ecosystem services. Research which aims to understand the relationships among multiple ecosystem services and the mechanisms behind these relationships will improve our ability to sustainably manage landscapes to provide multiple ecosystem services.

  • 66.
    Benzie, Magnus
    Stockholms universitet, Stockholm Resilience Centre, Stockholm Environment Institute.
    Social Justice and Adaptation in the UK2012Inngår i: Symposium: The Governance of Adaptation, 22-23 March 2012, Amsterdam, Netherlands: Programme and Abstracts, 2012, s. 37-Konferansepaper (Annet vitenskapelig)
  • 67.
    Berg, Alicia
    Stockholms universitet, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Empowering the Steel Industry as a Stakeholder: Environmental Management and Communication through a Social-Ecological Approach2013Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 poäng / 30 hpOppgave
    Abstract [en]

    This paper explores a case study of a Swedish tool steel company undergoing a transition from traditional environmental management practices to an enterprise identifying its place as part of a social-ecological system. The Corporate Ecosystem Services Review (ESR) was utilized by the company to begin this process by focusing on ecosystem services to determine how an ESR approach contributes to environmental management in practice. What resulted moved beyond the ESR to a tailored methodology, the internalization of a systems perspective, and a proposed new environmental management system.

    The results of the study provide a concrete, effective method for internalizing a systems perspective through a focus on ecosystems and presents a case for further analysis into what made it successful. It also provides an example of translating theory into practice, illustrating how a company can engage in sustainable development by valuing and managing the resilience of social-ecological systems through identifying their place in that system. The value of the results can be high for the case study company as well as for business in general.

  • 68.
    Berg, Håkan
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Berg, Charlotte
    Nguyen, Thanh Tam
    Integrated Rice-Fish Farming: Safeguarding Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services for Sustainable Food Production in the Mekong Delta2012Inngår i: Journal of Sustainable Agriculture, ISSN 1044-0046, E-ISSN 1540-7578, Vol. 36, nr 8, s. 859-872Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    A comparison of agricultural practices, with a specific focus on pesticide use, between rice and rice-fish farmers in the Can Tho' and Tien Giang provinces of the Mekong Delta in 2007, shows that integrated rice-fish farming can provide a competitive alternative to intensive rice mono-cropping, if the farmer restricts the use of pesticides and takes full advantage of the ecosystem services provided by the rice-field ecosystem. In Can Tho', rice-fish farmers had significantly higher income (43.6 million dong ha(-1) year(-1)) than other farmer groups, while this was not seen among rice-fish famers in Tien Giang (32.4 million dong ha(-1) year(-1)), which partly could be due to a high use of insecticides (0.9 kg active ingredient ha(-1) crop(-1)) and comparatively low fish yield among these farmers. The study emphasizes the need to rethink current agricultural systems and to provide opportunities for more diverse systems that maintain and enhance a range of ecosystem services and protect human health. Future production systems should not be optimized to only provide a single ecosystem service, such as rice, but designed to deliver a variety of interlinked ecosystem service such as rice, fish, pest control, and nutrient recycling.

  • 69.
    Berggren, Maja
    Stockholms universitet, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Is Growing Larger the Same as Becoming Resilient? A case study of the Gothenburg Pelagic Offshore Fishery2013Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 40 poäng / 60 hpOppgave
    Abstract [en]

    Scale enlargement and increased use of market mechanisms to improve fisheries’ management are a trend in many fisheries. These developments have economic benefits, but can also lead to loss of social-ecological knowledge, resilience, and employment opportunities in fishing communities. Successful large-scale fishers who have access to quotas benefit from these trends, but they also risk ending up in a lock-in, where a high degree of specialisation of fishing activities makes them vulnerable to economic and ecological fluctuation. Economic theory explains scale enlargement as an effect of economies of scale, but it cannot explain why these effects occur for certain groups of fishers and not for others. This study addresses this knowledge gap by exploring a small group of pelagic offshore fishers in Gothenburg, Sweden, who stand out in terms of their scale enlargement, profitability and political influence. Recently they also contributed to a change of management system towards increased use of economic management tools (Individual Transferable Quotas, ITQs). Using interviews with actors within and outside the pelagic offshore fishery, combined with participant observations, I describe a number of factors that can explain the Swedish development towards scale enlargement. Important for this development, it seems, is the fishers’ ‘entrepreneurial spirit’ and flexibility towards changing conditions. These are qualities that, in turn, have been supported by different contextual factors including abundant pelagic stocks, regulatory changes and a supportive community culture. Understanding the interaction between fishers’ activities and contextual developments can highlight why, and how, different development trajectories emerge in fisheries.

  • 70.
    Bergsten, Arvid
    Stockholms universitet, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Communicating ecology in local planning: The role of embedded ecologistsManuskript (preprint) (Annet vitenskapelig)
    Abstract [en]

    Local decision making needs to apply ecological knowledge (EK) to promote sustainable outcomes. Scientific and local EK can be incorporated by including knowledgable individuals in planning teams. This paper looks at the potential to integrate EK in planning institutions, by studying how 27 "embedded ecologists" communicate knowledge in 18 municipalities in the Stockholm region in Sweden. The analysis identifies communication patterns based on the terminology and form of EK that the surveyed ecologists prioritize in discussions with planners and politicians. The results show that maps and the meaning and direct benefit of nature to citizens are prioritized in planning discussions, since such EK can be accommodated in the current planning discourse. Knowledge regarding species and ecological complexity were more difficult to integrate, since it required simplification or translation to a citizen perspective on nature, or that the ecologist played a "communication role" that conflicted with the planning discourse. Three different communication roles are outlined, by contrasting their perspectives on EK and their likely causes and outcomes in the planning process. Recommendations are given about how governance institutions can make better use of embedded ecologists for in-house ecological knowledge.

  • 71.
    Bergsten, Arvid
    Stockholms universitet, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    The problem of fit in social-ecological systems: Detecting spatial mismatches between ecological 
connectivity and land management in an urban regionManuskript (preprint) (Annet vitenskapelig)
    Abstract [en]

    The problem of institutional fit in social-ecological systems has been empirically documented and conceptually discussed for decades, yet there is a shortage of approaches to systematically and quantitatively examine the level of fit.  Here we address this gap focusing on spatial fit in an urban and peri-urban regional landscape. Such landscapes typically exhibit significant fragmentation of remnant habitats, which can limit critical species dispersal. This may have detrimental effects on species persistence and ecosystem functioning, if land use is planned without consideration of the spatial patterns of fragmentation. Managing habitat fragmentation is particularly challenging when the scale of fragmentation reach beyond the control of single managers, thereby requiring different actors to coordinate their activities to address the problem at the appropriate scale.We present a research approach that maps patterns of collaborations between actors who manage different parts of a landscape, and then relates these patterns to potential dispersal patterns. We apply our approach to evaluate the fit between a collaborative wetland-management network comprising all 26 municipalities in the Stockholm County in Sweden, with an ecologically defined network of dispersed but ecologically interconnected wetlands. Many wetlands in this landscape are either intersected by the boundary between two or more municipalities, or located close to such boundaries, which implies a degree of ecological interconnectedness and a need for inter-municipal coordination related to wetland management across boundaries. We first estimate the level of ecological connectivity between wetlands in neighboring municipalities, and then use this estimate to elaborate the level of social-ecological fit vis-à-vis inter-municipal collaboration. We find that the level of fit is generally weak. Also, we identify critical misalignments of ecological connectivity and inter-municipal collaboration, respectively, as well as collaborations that represent an adequate alignment. These findings inform on where to most effectively allocate limited resources of collaborative capacity to enhance the level of social-ecological fit.  Our approach and results are graphically illustrated using maps, which facilitates the potential application of this method in land-use planning practice.

  • 72.
    Berkström, Charlotte
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Systemekologiska institutionen.
    Gullström, Martin
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Systemekologiska institutionen.
    Lindborg, Regina
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för naturgeografi och kvartärgeologi (INK). Stockholms universitet, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Mwandya, Augustine W.
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Zoologiska institutionen.
    Yahya, Saleh A. S.
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Zoologiska institutionen.
    Kautsky, Nils
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Systemekologiska institutionen.
    Nyström, Magnus
    Stockholms universitet, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Exploring 'knowns' and 'unknowns' in tropical seascape connectivity with insights from East African coral reefs2012Inngår i: Estuarine, Coastal and Shelf Science, ISSN 0272-7714, E-ISSN 1096-0015, Vol. 107, s. 1-21Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Applying a broader landscape perspective to understand spatio-temporal changes in local populations and communities has been increasingly used in terrestrial systems to study effects of human impact and land use change. With today’s major declines in fishery stocks and rapid degradation of natural coastal habitats, the understanding of habitat configuration and connectivity over relevant temporal and spatial scales is critical for conservation and fisheries management of the seascape. Coral reefs, seagrass beds and mangroves are key-components of the tropical seascape. The spatial distribution of these habitat-types may have strong influences on cross-habitat migration and connectivity patterns among organisms. However, the consequences of seascape fragmentation and ecological connectivity are largely unknown. Here, we review the literature to provide an overview of current knowledge with regards to connectivity and food-web interactions within the tropical seascape. We show that information on fish acting as mobile links and being part of nutrient transfer and trophic interactions is scarce. We continue by making an in-depth analysis of the seascape around Zanzibar (Eastern Africa) to fill some of the knowledge gaps identified by the literature survey. Our analysis shows that (i) fifty percent of all fish species found within the Zanzibar seascape use two or multiple habitat-types, (ii) eighteen percent of all coral reef-associated fish species use mangrove and seagrass beds as juvenile habitat, and (iii) macrocarnivores and herbivores are highly represented among those coral reef fish species that use mangrove and seagrass beds as juvenile habitat. We argue that understanding the inter-linkages within and between habitat-types is essential for successful management of the tropical seascape.

  • 73. Berndes, G.
    et al.
    Karlberg, Louise
    Stockholms universitet, Stockholm Resilience Centre, Stockholm Environment Institute.
    Lundqvist, J.
    Managing water to meet booth food and bioenergy demands2009Inngår i: Climate challenge – the safety’s off / [ed] B. Johansson, Stockholm: Formas , 2009, s. 259-277Kapittel i bok, del av antologi (Annet (populærvitenskap, debatt, mm))
  • 74.
    Berry, Margaret
    Stockholms universitet, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Slow Food in Transition: A study of niche development in Stockholm2014Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 80 poäng / 120 hpOppgave
    Abstract [en]

    Food systems represent one of the most critical resources under threat as a result of an unsustainable dominant regime. It is essential that the agricultural sector and food systems be addressed in order to achieve systemic and lasting change for sustainable development. This study uses transition theory’s strategic niche management approach to analyze a social innovation focused on creating systemic change within the currently unsustainable food system regime in order to influence a sustainability transition, using Slow Food Stockholm (a local level grassroots and social-ecological innovation niche) as a case study. Theoretically informed practical recommendations are given to help the Stockholm Slow Food movement grow and diffuse beyond its niche: to address social network weaknesses by broadening and strengthening relationships with underrepresented groups as well as resourceful and mainstream regime actors; to strengthen learning processes by fostering second-order learning through the creation of a platform for active and critical contemplation and knowledge sharing regarding niche growth and niche related topics; to manage expectations more realistically by identify and clarify niche goals for both the long term and the short term using tangible projects to stimulate involvement and concrete action opportunities for activists. Finally, reflections are given regarding remaining research gaps and the need for further studies relating to innovations for sustainable food system transitions. 

  • 75.
    Beyene, Atakilte
    Stockholms universitet, Stockholm Resilience Centre, Stockholm Environment Institute.
    Smallholder-led transformation towards biofuel production in Ethiopia2011Inngår i: Biofuels, Land Grabbing and Food Security in Africa / [ed] P.B. Matondi, K. Havnevik and A. Beyene, Zed Books , 2011, s. 90-105Kapittel i bok, del av antologi (Annet vitenskapelig)
  • 76. Biermann, Frank
    et al.
    Abbott, Kenneth
    Andresen, Steinar
    Backstrand, Karin
    Bernstein, Steven
    Betsill, Michele M.
    Bulkeley, Harriet
    Cashore, Benjamin
    Clapp, Jennifer
    Folke, Carl
    Stockholms universitet, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Gupta, Aarti
    Gupta, Joyeeta
    Haas, Peter M.
    Jordan, Andrew
    Kanie, Norichika
    Kluvankova-Oravska, Tatiana
    Lebel, Louis
    Liverman, Diana
    Meadowcroft, James
    Mitchell, Ronald B.
    Newell, Peter
    Oberthur, Sebastian
    Olsson, Lennart
    Pattberg, Philipp
    Sanchez-Rodriguez, Roberto
    Schroeder, Heike
    Underdal, Arild
    Vieira, Susana Camargo
    Vogel, Coleen
    Young, Oran R.
    Brock, Andrea
    Zondervan, Ruben
    Transforming governance and institutions for global sustainability: key insights from the Earth System Governance Project2012Inngår i: Current Opinion in Environmental Sustainability, ISSN 1877-3435, E-ISSN 1877-3443, Vol. 4, nr 1, s. 51-60Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    The current institutional framework for sustainable development is by far not strong enough to bring about the swift transformative progress that is needed. This article contends that incrementalism-the main approach since the 1972 Stockholm Conference-will not suffice to bring about societal change at the level and speed needed to mitigate and adapt to earth system transformation. Instead, the article argues that transformative structural change in global governance is needed, and that the 2012 United Nations Conference on Sustainable Development in Rio de Janeiro must turn into a major stepping stone for a much stronger institutional framework for sustainable development. The article details core areas where urgent action is required. The article is based on an extensive social science assessment conducted by 32 members of the lead faculty, scientific steering committee, and other affiliates of the Earth System Governance Project. This Project is a ten-year research initiative under the auspices of the International Human Dimensions Programme on Global Environmental Change (IHDP), which is sponsored by the International Council for Science (ICSU), the International Social Science Council (ISSC), and the United Nations University (UNU).

  • 77. Biggs, Duan
    et al.
    Biggs, Reinette (Oonsie)
    Stockholms universitet, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Dakos, Vasilis
    Scholes, Robert J.
    Schoon, Michael
    Are We Entering an Era of Concatenated Global Crises?2011Inngår i: Ecology & society, ISSN 1708-3087, E-ISSN 1708-3087, Vol. 16, nr 2, s. 10-Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    An increase in the frequency and intensity of environmental crises associated with accelerating human-induced global change is of substantial concern to policy makers. The potential impacts, especially on the poor, are exacerbated in an increasingly connected world that enables the emergence of crises that are coupled in time and space. We discuss two factors that can interact to contribute to such an increased concatenation of crises: (1) the increasing strength of global vs. local drivers of change, so that changes become increasingly synchronized; and (2) unprecedented potential for the propagation of crises, and an enhanced risk of management interventions in one region becoming drivers elsewhere, because of increased connectivity. We discuss the oil-food-financial crisis of 2007 to 2008 as an example of a concatenated crisis with origin and ultimate impacts in far removed parts of the globe. The potential for a future of concatenated shocks requires adaptations in science and governance including (a) an increased tolerance of uncertainty and surprise, (b) strengthening capacity for early detection and response to shocks, and (c) flexibility in response to enable adaptation and learning.

  • 78.
    Biggs, R.
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Carpenter, S.R.
    Brock, W.A.
    Spurious Certainty: How Ignoring Measurement Error and Environmental Heterogeneity May Contribute to Environmental Controversies.2009Inngår i: BioScience, ISSN 0006-3568, E-ISSN 1525-3244, Vol. 59, nr 1, s. 65-76Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
  • 79.
    Biggs, R.
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Carpenter, S.R.
    Brock, W.A.
    Turning back from the brink: Detecting an impending regime shift in time to avert it2009Inngår i: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, PNAS, ISSN 1091-6490, Vol. 106, nr 3, s. 826-831Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
  • 80.
    Biggs, Reinette
    Stockholms universitet, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Assessing state and trends in ecosystem services and human well-being2010Inngår i: Ecosystems and Human Well-being: A manual for assessment practitioners / [ed] Scholes, R.J., R. Biggs, C. Palm and A. Duraiappah, Island Press , 2010Kapittel i bok, del av antologi (Annet vitenskapelig)
  • 81.
    Biggs, Reinette
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Blenckner, Thorsten
    Stockholms universitet, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Folke, Carl
    Stockholms universitet, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Gordon, Line
    Stockholms universitet, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Norström, Albert
    Stockholms universitet, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Peterson, Garry
    Stockholms universitet, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Regime Shifts2011Inngår i: Sourcebook in Theoretical Ecology / [ed] A Hastings, L Gross, University of California Press, 2011Kapittel i bok, del av antologi (Annet vitenskapelig)
  • 82.
    Biggs, Reinette
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Crépin, Ann-Sophie
    Stockholms universitet, Stockholm Resilience Centre. The Beijer Institute of Ecological Economics, The Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences, Sweden.
    Engström, Gustav
    Stockholms universitet, Stockholm Resilience Centre. The Beijer Institute of Ecological Economics, The Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences, Sweden.
    Folke, Carl
    Stockholms universitet, Stockholm Resilience Centre. The Beijer Institute of Ecological Economics, The Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences, Sweden.
    Kautsky, Nils
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Systemekologiska institutionen.
    Walker, Brian
    Stockholms universitet, Stockholm Resilience Centre. Sustainable Ecosystems, Australia.
    General Resilience to Cope with Extreme Events2012Inngår i: Sustainability, ISSN 2071-1050, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 4, nr 12, s. 3248-3259Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

     Resilience to specified kinds of disasters is an active area of research and practice. However, rare or unprecedented disturbances that are unusually intense or extensive require a more broad-spectrum type of resilience. General resilience is the capacity of social-ecological systems to adapt or transform in response to unfamiliar, unexpected and extreme shocks. Conditions that enable general resilience include diversity, modularity, openness, reserves, feedbacks, nestedness, monitoring, leadership, and trust. Processes for building general resilience are an emerging and crucially important area of research.

  • 83.
    Biggs, Reinette
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Stockholm Resilience Centre. Stellenbosch University, South Africa.
    Schlüter, Maja
    Stockholms universitet, Stockholm Resilience Centre. Leibniz-Institute of Freshwater Ecology and Inland Fisheries, Germany.
    Biggs, Duan
    Bohensky, Erin L.
    BurnSilver, Shauna
    Cundill, Georgina
    Dakos, Vasilis
    Daw, Tim M.
    Stockholms universitet, Stockholm Resilience Centre. University of East Anglia, United Kingdom.
    Evans, Louisa S.
    Kotschy, Karen
    Leitch, Anne M.
    Meek, Chanda
    Quinlan, Allyson
    Raudsepp-Hearne, Ciara
    Robards, Martin D.
    Schoon, Michael L.
    Schultz, Lisen
    Stockholms universitet, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    West, Paul C.
    Toward Principles for Enhancing the Resilience of Ecosystem Services2012Inngår i: Annual Review Environment and Resources, ISSN 1543-5938, E-ISSN 1545-2050, Vol. 37, s. 421-448Artikkel, forskningsoversikt (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Enhancing the resilience of ecosystem services (ES) that underpin human well-being is critical for meeting current and future societal needs, and requires specific governance and management policies. Using the literature, we identify seven generic policy-relevant principles for enhancing the resilience of desired ES in the face of disturbance and ongoing change in social-ecological systems (SES). These principles are (P1) maintain diversity and redundancy, (P2) manage connectivity, (P3) manage slow variables and feedbacks, (P4) foster an understanding of SES as complex adaptive systems (CAS), (P5) encourage learning and experimentation, (P6) broaden participation, and (P7) promote polycentric governance systems. We briefly define each principle, review how and when it enhances the resilience of ES, and conclude with major research gaps. In practice, the principles often co-occur and are highly interdependent. Key future needs are to better understand these interdependencies and to operationalize and apply the principles in different policy and management contexts.

  • 84.
    Biggs, Reinette
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Westley, Frances R.
    University of Waterloo, Canada.
    Carpenter, Stephen R.
    University of Wisconsin-Madison, USA.
    Navigating the Back Loop: Fostering Social Innovation and Transformation in Ecosystem Management2010Inngår i: Ecology & society, ISSN 1708-3087, E-ISSN 1708-3087, Vol. 15, nr 2, s. 9-Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Addressing the environmental challenges of the 21st century requires substantial changes to the way modern society views and manages ecosystems. In particular, many authors contend that fundamental transformation of the largely sectoral, expert-centered ecosystem-management institutions of modern, Western societies is needed. There is increasing agreement that more adaptive, integrated, collaborative ecosystem-management approaches, interlinked at multiple scales, would improve society's ability to sustainably manage complex social-ecological systems. Therefore, understanding processes of transformation, and factors that may enable transformation in ecosystem management, has become an active research area. We explore ecosystem-management transformations using a social-innovation framework. Based on three local-level case studies of transformation in freshwater management, we provide a pilot assessment of factors that may promote the emergence and adoption of integrated, collaborative ecosystem-management approaches. Our analysis suggests that ongoing environmental degradation, increasing environmental awareness, and shifting societal values are creating fertile ground for the emergence and adoption of new approaches to ecosystem management. Based on the case studies we examined, we suggest that initiatives that foster environmental awareness and attachment to local ecosystems, develop capacity for social entrepreneurship in the environmental arena, promote dialogue between key stakeholders, and provide institutional support to new institutions may facilitate the emergence of integrated, collaborative ecosystem-management approaches.

  • 85.
    Birnbaum, Simon
    Stockholms universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Statsvetenskapliga institutionen. Stockholms universitet, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Environmental co-governance, legitimacy, and the quest for compliance: When and why is stakeholder participation desirable?2016Inngår i: Journal of Environmental Policy and Planning, ISSN 1523-908X, E-ISSN 1522-7200, Vol. 18, nr 3, s. 306-323Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Deliberative forms of stakeholder participation have been widely embraced as a key measure for addressing legitimacy deficits and non-compliance in environmental governance. However, the great significance of such collaborative structures for state-stakeholder interaction is much too often accepted uncritically as an established truth in the environmental policy discourse. Building on examples from the literature on fisheries co-governance, this article constructs a conceptual and normative framework for interpreting and assessing such views about co-governance, legitimacy and compliance. Analysing central claims in this discourse in relation to different concepts and standards of legitimacy helps us identify and distinguish many powerful reasons to welcome co-governance. However, the article defends the need to do so cautiously and reflectively. It is conceptually misleading to suggest that more intense forms of co-governance will generally improve the overall level of social legitimacy and, thereby, compliance rates among stakeholders. Furthermore, it is argued that the democratic value of co-governance is not fundamental. The democratic desirability of such arrangements should be primarily assessed on instrumental-pragmatic grounds, focusing on their capacity to serve the wider ideals of equal citizenship and public reason.

  • 86.
    Birnbaum, Simon
    Stockholms universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Statsvetenskapliga institutionen. Stockholms universitet, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Welfare Contractualism, Social Justice, and Republican Citizenship2015Inngår i: New Contractualism in European Welfare State Policies / [ed] Rune Ervik, Nanna Kildal, Even Nilssen, Farnham: Ashgate, 2015, s. 17-46Kapittel i bok, del av antologi (Annet vitenskapelig)
  • 87.
    Bjerén, Gunilla
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för etnologi, religionshistoria och genusvetenskap, Genusvetenskap.
    Beyene, Atakilte
    Stockholms universitet, Stockholm Resilience Centre, Stockholm Environment Institute.
    Gender, mobility and livelihoods in an Ethiopian pre-revolutionary town2012Inngår i: Locus: revista de história, ISSN 1413-3024, Vol. 35, nr 2, s. 203-214Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper explores the interrelationship between gender, ethnicity, migration/mobility and livelihood opportunities in the urban area of Shashemene in Southern Ethiopia in the period immediately prior to the end of the Ethiopian Empire in 1974. The major finding is that gender is a determining social factor in the mobility and livelihood opportunities of individuals. A striking result from the study is that livelihood alternatives were “urban” to a relatively small extent. Most persons found a living in activities that are to be found in rural as well as in urban areas. For men, ethnicity provides a mediating factor whereas the mobility and livelihood patterns for women are less differentiated by ethnic identity. Individual mobility is characterised both by urban-urban and rural-urban movements. In a study carried out in 1973, women had spent less number of years migrating when they arrived at Shashemene compared to their male counterparts. Similarly, the average number of new places, where they resided for at least one year, was fewer for women than for men. Our results also indicate differences in the migration/mobility rates of women and men across ages. Women’s migration seems to drop abruptly after the age 25. In general, the mobile period of life was shorter for women than for men.

  • 88. Björk, G.
    et al.
    Nohr, C.
    Gustafsson, B.G.
    Stockholms universitet, Övriga enheter, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Lindberg, A.E.B.
    Ice dynamics in the Bothnian Bay inferred from ADCP measurements2008Inngår i: Tellus, nr 60A, s. 178-188Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
  • 89.
    Björk, Nicola
    Stockholms universitet, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Opportunities and obstacles implementing animal welfare friendly meat to the Swedish public catering sector2014Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 80 poäng / 120 hpOppgave
    Abstract [en]

    Provision of meat to public catering canteens in Sweden is done through public procurement processes according to the Law of Public Procurement. However, due to the lack of a harmonized assessment standard and policy for communication throughout the supply chain, there is no animal welfare certification or label that contracting authorities can use to verify animal welfare friendly meat, in order to verify that the meat they purchase comes from reliable sources. My question is; is there a future in which animal welfare friendly meat is provided as the norm, to consumers at public canteens? To answer this question, the aim of this thesis was to identify a feasible way for Swedish wholesale dealers who provide food to the public sector, to implement meat originating from a source where animal-based assessments have been made according to the Welfare Quality® project.

    The findings showed that the top four critical elements to consider for an animal welfare friendly future are: 1. The consciousness and attitude by each stakeholder – a positive attitude among not only supply chain actors but also among the decision makers eases the process to bring animal welfare friendly meat. 2. The local political vision - in order for contracting authorities to work proactively towards bringing animal welfare friendly meat the political vision is fundamental. 3. A united legislation on animal welfare friendly systems in EU - based upon an animal-based assessment standard. 4. The Law of Public Procurement and its stance on an animal welfare friendly production – the requirements that can be set from an animal-based assessment system needs to be compatible with the Law of Public Procurement. Further research on the specific findings is recommended in order to deeper evaluate the needs to implement animal welfare friendly meat to Swedish public catering canteens. 

  • 90.
    Björkin Säll, Karin
    Stockholms universitet, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Walking the talk: Political consumers and their information search towards more sustainable consumption choices2010Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 20 poäng / 30 hpOppgave
    Abstract [en]

    Political consumers, by using their consumerism to make political statements, constitute a potential force in changing global consumption patterns towards more sustainable ones. Thus new insights concerning this specific group and its ways of searching for information prior to a purchase decision might help understand the mechanisms behind sustainable consumption choices. This study is based on a series of twelve personal qualitative interviews conducted with Swedish consumers of sustainable goods. These interviews confirmed certain characteristics known to political consumers, such as a high level of commitment, high standards regarding information and the frequent use of labelling schemes. Furthermore this study has shown the complexity experienced by this group of consumers regarding sustainability claims and the role of a chosen “sustainability champion” in helping make sense of this complex information. Finally this study reminds of the significance of respecting the consumer and his trust for a message as well as the need for simple and clear information tools to distinguish proper sustainable goods from others.

  • 91. Björklund, Johanna
    et al.
    Araya, Hailu
    Edwards, Sue
    Goncalves, Andre
    Hook, Karin
    Lundberg, Jakob
    Stockholms universitet, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Medina, Charito
    Ecosystem based agriculture combining production and conservation a viable way to feed the world in the long term?2012Inngår i: Journal of Sustainable Agriculture, ISSN 1044-0046, E-ISSN 1540-7578, Vol. 36, nr 7, s. 824-855Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    This study analyzed examples of sustainable ecosystem-based agriculture where management methods supported livelihoods of smallholders while at the same time local ecosystem services were enhanced in Ethiopia, Brazil, and the Philippines. Participation by farmers and collective actions were found to be a crucial driving force, as local specific knowledge and learning by doing were main components of the development. Social cohesion, particularly through associations and cooperatives, and improved marketing opportunities were also important drivers. Furthermore, recognition by authorities at all levels was perceived as crucial. Effects of climate change, insecure property rights, and political instability were potential threats. The possibilities of such systems to be scaled up beyond self-sufficiency raised further questions.

  • 92.
    Björkvik, Emma
    Stockholms universitet, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Explaining the decline in Swedish Baltic Sea small-scale fisheries: A historical analysis of fishers in their  social and ecological context2013Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 40 poäng / 60 hpOppgave
    Abstract [en]

    Swedish fisheries, as many other European fisheries are characterized by overcapacity. Efforts trying to reduce the overcapacity have led to fewer but bigger vessels. Hence, fish catches are aggregated among fewer and fewer fishers with bigger and bigger boats while problems with overcapacity remain. Instead, it is the fishers with smaller vessels that faced major declines and the Swedish Baltic Sea small-scale fisheries (SSF) have been identified to soon disappear. A disappearance would be unfortunate because SSF represent values that could be used in the development towards more ecological and social sustainable fisheries. The decline of SSF appears to be structural persistent, produced by factors interacting over time. To address the negative trend, it is essential to know how and why the decline became structural persistent. The objective of this study is therefore to investigate the long-term historical development of the SSF as a social-ecological system. A mixed-method approach was used to assess and identify interactions between fishers and contextual factors over time. The results show how the decline became structurally persistent in 1960s after a conjunction in time where fishers’ livelihood became more dependent upon fisheries while fish abundance started to decline. After the conjunction fishers became trapped within a system where social and ecological contextual factors constrained their fishing practices. This thesis provides new insights on the difficult situation in which SSF are currently trapped. These insights can be used for future development of Swedish fisheries, which needs to move away from increased economic optimization and instead enhance long-term sustainability.

  • 93.
    Blenckner, Thorsten
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Döring, Ralf
    Ebeling, Michael
    Hoff, Ayoe
    Tomczak, Maciej
    FishSTERN: a first attempt at an ecological-economic evaluation of fishery management scenarios in the Baltic Sea region2011Rapport (Annet vitenskapelig)
  • 94.
    Blenckner, Thorsten
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Elliott, Alex
    Centre for ecology and hydrology.
    Markensten, Hampus, et. al.
    Clime Project, Upsala University.
    Modelling the Effects of Climate Change on the Seasonal Dynamics of Phytoplankton2010Inngår i: Climate and Lake Impacts in Europe / [ed] George, Glen, Springer , 2010, 1Kapittel i bok, del av antologi (Annet vitenskapelig)
  • 95.
    Blenckner, Thorsten et. al.
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Adrian, Rita
    Leibniz Institute of Freshwater Ecology and Island Fisheries.
    The Impact of climate change on lakes in Northern Europe2010Inngår i: The Impact of Climate Change on European Lakes / [ed] George, Glen, Springer , 2010Kapittel i bok, del av antologi (Annet vitenskapelig)
  • 96.
    Blenckner, Thorsten
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Noges, Tiina
    Tranvik, Lars
    Pettersson, Kurt
    Naddafi, Rahmat
    Preface2011Inngår i: Hydrobiologia, ISSN 0018-8158, E-ISSN 1573-5117, Vol. 660, nr 1, s. 1-2Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
  • 97. Blyh, Kerstin
    et al.
    Erikcsdotter, Siv
    Stockholms universitet, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Nekoro, Marmar
    Stockholms universitet, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Scharin, Henrik
    Stockholms universitet, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Hasselström, Linus
    Söderqvist, Tore
    Värdet av en friskare Östersjö2012Inngår i: Havet: om miljötillståndet i i svenska havsområden, Stockholm: Naturvårdsverket, 2012, , s. 3s. 17-19Kapittel i bok, del av antologi (Annet vitenskapelig)
    Abstract [sv]

    Totalt är Östersjöborna villiga att betala runt 40 miljarder kronor per år för en förbättrad havsmiljö. Det visar en ny studie där befolkningen i alla nio länder runt Östersjön tillfrågats om vad de är villiga att betala för att minska övergödningen i havet. Studien visar att det finns ett stöd hos befolkningen runt Östersjön för att satsa resurser på åtgärder.

  • 98.
    Bocké, Alice
    Stockholms universitet, Övriga enheter, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Hållbart skogsbruk och naturvård – ett skogsägarperspektiv2008Independent thesis Basic level (professional degree), 20 poäng / 30 hpOppgave
    Abstract [en]

    The Swedish government has set up 16 environmental goals for Sweden to achieve. One of

    them is “Living forests”, which is the foundation for the “National strategy for the formal

    protection of forests”. The “National strategy” puts the private forest owner at the centre of

    attention in order to achieve the environmental goal “Living forests”. Adaptive Management

    could help with the implementation of the “National strategy”. 9 qualitative interviews have

    been done in order to examine how the communication between private forest owners and

    responsible authorities works. The interviews give the private forest owners’ perspective, and

    what they want the communication to be like, when it comes to conservation biology.

    Communication, language, and how to deal with conservation biology have been the main

    issues brought up during the interviews. The private forest owners also demand more

    flexibility and a keener ear from responsible authorities. The private forest owners would like

    a better knowledge of what is happening when it comes to conservation biology on their land.

    The private forest owners and the responsible authorities do have similar goals for what they

    want to achieve with the forest, but they disagree on how to achieve that goal.

  • 99.
    Bodin, Ö.
    Stockholms universitet, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Prioritizing habitat patches for conservation infragmented landscapes/townscapes using network based models and analyses.2009Inngår i: Sustainable Development and Planning: IV / [ed] C. A. Brebbia, N. Neophytou, E. Beriatos, I. Ioannou and A. G. Kungolos., WIT Press , 2009, s. 109-118Kapittel i bok, del av antologi (Annet vitenskapelig)
  • 100.
    Bodin, Ö.
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Övriga enheter, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Crona, B.
    Stockholms universitet, Övriga enheter, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Community-Based Management of Natural Resources: Exploring the Role of Social Capital and Leadership in a Rural Fishing Community2008Inngår i: World Development, Vol. 36, s. 2763–2779-Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
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