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  • 51.
    Arrhenius, Birgit
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur.
    Eriksson, Gunilla
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur.
    Gulldens hög i Husby-Långhundra2006Rapport (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
  • 52.
    Arrhenius, Birgit
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur, Arkeologiska forskningslaboratoriet.
    Jansson, Ingmar
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur, Arkeologi.
    Small items and major conclusions: A discussion of the findings from Gullhögen, Old Uppsala2015Ingår i: Small Things Wide Horizons: Studies in Honour of Birgitta Hårdh / [ed] Lars Larsson, Fredrik Ekengren, Bertil Helgesson and Bengt Söderberg, Oxford: Archaeopress, 2015, s. 141-149Kapitel i bok, del av antologi (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
  • 53.
    Arrhenius, Birgit
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur, Arkeologiska forskningslaboratoriet.
    O'Meadhra, Uaninn
    Excavations at Helgö: 18, conclusions and new aspects2011Samlingsverk (redaktörskap) (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
  • 54.
    Arrhenius, Brigit
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur. Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur, Arkeologiska forskningslaboratoriet.
    Brisingamen and the Menet necklace2009Ingår i: Glaube, Kult und Herrschaft Phänomene des Religiösen im 1. Jahrtausend n. Chr.in Mittel- und NordeuropaAkten des 59. Internationalen Sachsensymposionsund derGrundprobleme der frühgeschichtlichen Entwicklung im Mitteldonauraum / [ed] Uta von Freeden, Herwig Friesinger & Egon Wamers, Berlin, 2009, s. 219-230Kapitel i bok, del av antologi (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
    Abstract [en]

    This article discusses the jewellery worn by the goddess Freyja, the Brisingamen. The author has previously claimed that brising (“glowing”) is a heiti for “garnet”, in Latin called carbunculus and in Greek ἄνθραξ. The word men has been compared by other authors to the Old German word menni meaning a collar for a dog. However, its origin may have been the Menet (alternatively Menat or Menit) – originally the necklace of the cow god Hathor which in the Greco-Roman time was taken over by the fertility goddess Isis. The Menet necklace was mostly used in ceremonies together with the musical instrument sistrum, when the rattling of the Menet was an important element. The late Roma like bracteates or coin imitations and garnet jewellery were important elements, too. Owing to its many metal pendants the Brisingamen could have produced a sound, though in this case not rattling but rather a sound more like jingle bells. This paper presents several precious items of jewellery representing Freyja’s Brisingamen from the Viking period, the most exquisite examples being the necklaces from Hoen in Norway and Eketorp in Sweden

  • 55. Aspöck, Edeltraud
    et al.
    Klevnäs, Alison
    University of Cambridge, UK.
    Past Disturbances of Graves: The Reopening of Graves for Grave-Robbery and Other Practices2012Ingår i: The European Archaeologist, ISSN 1022-0135, Vol. 36, s. 66-70Artikel i tidskrift (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
  • 56.
    Audy, Florent
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur.
    Suspended Value: Using Coins as Pendants in Viking-Age Scandinavia (c. AD 800–1140)2018Doktorsavhandling, monografi (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
    Abstract [en]

    The use of coins as pendants is a common practice in the Scandinavian Viking Age (c. AD 800–1140). About three per cent of the coins circulating in Scandinavia show signs of having been adapted for suspension, either with a small hole or a loop. Modifying coins in this way changes the nature of the object. The pierced and looped coins move from having an economic function to having a display and symbolic function, at least temporarily. 

    After being long neglected by both archaeologists and numismatists, the reuse of coins as pendants has started to receive attention in recent years. This arises mainly from a desire to approach coins from perspectives other than purely economic ones. Coins, like any other archaeological object, are part of material culture. It is therefore also relevant and necessary to investigate their social and cultural significance.

    The aim of this thesis is to understand why coins were adapted for suspension and worn as personal ornaments in Viking-Age Scandinavia. Unlike most ornaments of the time, the production of which necessarily involved craft specialists, the Viking-Age coin-pendants could be produced directly by their owners. Their study can thus provide unique insights into how the coins of which they are made, and the messages they carry, were perceived by those using them. What made coins so meaningful that they were often turned into pendants?

    The point of departure adopted here is the object, the ‘coin-pendant’ itself, but this object does not exist in a vacuum. Particular attention is paid to the different contexts that the coin-pendants have navigated throughout their lives, such as minting, use as currency or use as ornament. This contextual approach is combined with a semiotic one, so as to better understand how the meaning of the object was constructed. 

    The relationship between coin-pendants and owners of coin-pendants can be explored by investigating several processes that reflect the owners’ intentions, such as coin selection, modification for suspension, orientation of the motives and combination with other ornaments. These processes allow us to understand how the coin-pendants were valued by those using them.  However, it is not possible to fully understand this relationship without putting it into perspective. This means studying: (1) the wider social, economic, cultural and religious framework in which the practice of reusing coins as pendants is situated; (2) the objects with which the coin-pendants are metaphorically associated.

    The material forming the basis for this study is both archaeological and numismatic. It consists of two main components: 134 Scandinavian graves containing coin-pendants and a random sample of 80 Scandinavian hoards. The hoard material is primarily intended for quantitative purposes while the grave catalogue is primarily intended for qualitative purposes. The importance of studying the Viking-Age coin-pendants both in graves and in hoards cannot be overemphasised. None of these contexts directly reflects the reality of the practice.

    The study shows that the practice of using coins as pendants was very diverse and could be adapted to individual tastes. Within this diversity, however, a common denominator emerges: the object ‘coin’. It is clear that there was something special about coins in Viking-Age Scandinavia and that the meaning of the coin-pendants was largely derived from the ideas with which coins were associated.

  • 57.
    Back Danielsson, Ing-Marie
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur.
    A Rare Analogy: Contemporary Cremation Practices2009Ingår i: On the Threshold: Burial Archaeology in the Twenty-first Century / [ed] Back Danielsson, I.-M., Gustin, I., Larsson, A., Myrberg, N. and Thedéen, S., Stockholm: Stockholm Unviersity , 2009Kapitel i bok, del av antologi (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents four different examples of how studies of contemporary cremation practices are an important aspect of archaeological research, both as a focus of archaeological research into the recent and contemporary past and as a source of analogy and/or anti-analogy in the interpretation of prehistoric mortuary practices. I show that archaeology contributed in a most direct way to the introduction of modern cremations in Sweden, that an archaeological analysis may be made of the architecture of death, and that the very cremation act of today may be fruitfully contrasted to that of Late Iron Age Scandinavia. Lastly, I discuss the significance of the concepts of the body, identity and person.

  • 58.
    Back Danielsson, Ing-Marie
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur. Allmän arkeologi.
    Bodies and Identitities in Late Iron Age Scandinavia2008Ingår i: Prehistoric Europe.: Theory and Practice., Wiley-Blackwell , 2008Kapitel i bok, del av antologi (Refereegranskat)
  • 59.
    Back Danielsson, Ing-Marie
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur.
    Go Figure!: Creating Intertwined Worlds in the Scandinavian Late Iron Age (AD 550–1050)2010Ingår i: Anthropomorphic and Zoomorphic Miniature Figuresin Eurasia, Africa and Meso-AmericaMorphology, materiality, technology, function and context: Materiality, technology, function and context / [ed] Dragos Gheorghiu and Ann Cyphers, Oxford: Archaeopress , 2010, s. 79-90Kapitel i bok, del av antologi (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper discusses Scandinavian gold foil figures from the early part of the Late Iron Age (AD 550–1050). The author presents two major points of interest that have been neglected in previous research. The first highlights how the manipulations the figures have undergone must be taken into consideration, which is accomplished with the help of theatre theory, semiotics and anthropology. The second places an emphasis on how the context from which the figures have been retrieved must be analysed. Consequently, from the example of a ceremonial building at Uppåkra, Sweden, it is contended that the figures were made by artisans/smiths that, apart from expertly making the figures, also acted as ritual specialists when the structure was built or inaugurated. As such, they were responsible for depositing specific figures in particular, designated and pivotal places that needed protection or other ritual treatment. The gold foil figures further highlight the intertwinement between subject and object, human and nonhuman, as well as between the divine and the mundane. Therefore they contribute significantly to discussions on materiality.

  • 60.
    Back Danielsson, Ing-Marie
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur.
    Hagerman, M. Försvunnen värld: Om den största arkeologiska utgrävningen någonsin i Sverige2011Ingår i: Fornvännen, ISSN 0015-7813, E-ISSN 1404-9430Artikel, recension (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
  • 61.
    Back Danielsson, Ing-Marie
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur.
    Hemdrup-staven – ett nytt tolkningsförslag2001Ingår i: Fornvännen, s. 73-77Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
  • 62.
    Back Danielsson, Ing-Marie
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur.
    Härjad hög i Hallunda.: Arkeologisk undersökning av anläggning 34 från yngre järnålder på gravfält RAÄ 75, Hallunda, Botkyrka sn, Södermanland.2000Rapport (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
  • 63.
    Back Danielsson, Ing-Marie
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur.
    Ingenious Ignition: “Flame, I’m gonna live forever” and other movie rhythms shaking Late Iron Age bodies on the road2003Ingår i: Scandinavian archaeological practice – in theory: Proceedings from the 6th Nordic TAG, Oslo 2001, 2003, s. 40-57Kapitel i bok, del av antologi (Refereegranskat)
  • 64.
    Back Danielsson, Ing-Marie
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur.
    Liten lurifax i Lejre2010Ingår i: Arkaeologisk Forum, ISSN 1399-5545, nr 22, s. 30-33Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [sv]

    Den lilla figurin som återfanns i Lejre år 2009 utropades genast till att vara en man och dessutom asaguden Oden. Men stämmer det? Kan arkeologer verkligen vara säkra på att den vikingatida danska miniatyrfiguren är man och att det är Oden? I denna artikel diskuteras vilka konsekvenser enkla kategoriseringar får för vår förståelse av såväl förhistoria som nutid. Dessutom ges förslag till alternativa sätt att närma sig figurinen.

  • 65.
    Back Danielsson, Ing-Marie
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur.
    Masking Moments: The Transitions of Bodies and Beings in Late Iron Age Scandinavia2007Doktorsavhandling, monografi (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis explores bodily representations in Late Iron Age Scandinavia (400–1050 AD). Non-human bodies, such as gold foil figures, and human bodies are analysed. The work starts with an examination and deconstruction of the sex/gender categories to the effect that they are considered to be of minor value for the purposes of the thesis. Three analytical concepts – masks, miniature, and metaphor – are deployed in order to interpret how and why the chosen bodies worked within their prehistoric contexts.

    The manipulations the figures sometimes have undergone are referred to as masking practices, discussed in Part One. It is shown that masks work and are powerful by being paradoxical; that they are vehicles for communication; and that they are, in effect, transitional objects bridging gaps that arise in continuity as a result of events such as symbolic or actual deaths.

    In Part Two miniaturization is discussed. Miniaturization contributes to making worlds intelligible, negotiable and communicative. Bodies in miniatures in comparison to other miniature objects are particularly potent. Taking gold foil figures under special scrutiny, it is claimed that gold, its allusions as well as its inherent properties conveyed numinosity. Consequently gold foil figures, regardless of the context, must be understood as extremely forceful agents.

    Part Three examines metaphorical thinking and how human and animal body parts were used in pro-creational acts, resulting in the birth of persons. However, these need not have been human, but could have been the outcomes of turning a deceased into an ancestor, iron into a steel sword, or clay into a ceramic urn, hence expanding and transforming the members of the family/household. Thus, bone in certain contexts acted as a transitional object or as a generative substance.

    It is concluded that the bodies of research are connected to transitions, and that the theme of transformation was one fundamental characteristic of the societies of study.

  • 66.
    Back Danielsson, Ing-Marie
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för etnologi, religionshistoria och genusvetenskap, Genusvetenskap.
    Materials of affect: Miniatures in the Scandinavian Late Iron Age (550-1050 AD)2013Ingår i: Archaeology After Interpretation: Returning Materials to Archaeological Theory / [ed] Benjamin Alberti, Andrew Meirion Jones, Joshua Pollard, Walnut Creek, Ca: Left Coast Press Inc., 2013Kapitel i bok, del av antologi (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper discusses Scandinavian gold-foil figures—small human-like figures hammered or cut out of thin foil—from the early part of the Scandinavian Late Iron Age (AD 550—1050) from a relational perspective. Earlier interpretations largely approach them as symbols and representations, which downplays their practical or performative role and results in static or embalmed objects. In this paper I discuss the affective dimensions of the figures, as well as some of the myriad rhizomatic relations that were generated through the processes of manufacture, manipulation, and visual encounter. I will argue that during the Late Iron Age in Scandinavia certain human beings and gold-foil figures were ontological equivalents, and that gold-foil figures go far beyond our contemporary understanding of representations.

  • 67.
    Back Danielsson, Ing-Marie
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur.
    Much Ado about Nothing?: Gender Research in Journals during the last 30 Years within Archaeology2012Ingår i: To Tender Gender: The Pasts and Futures of Gender Research in Archaeology / [ed] Ing-Marie Back Danielsson, Susanne Thedéen, Stockholm: Stockholm University, 2012, s. 17-32Kapitel i bok, del av antologi (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper accounts for the extent to which gender research is represented in leading archaeological journals throughout the 1980s to the present through the database Arts & Humanities Citation Index (ISI). The paper regards gender research as including gender, feminisms, masculinities, queer, intersectionality and embodiment. It is concluded that gender research, despite its alleged significance and progress in later years, is substantially marginalized within mainstream archaeology. Comparisons are also made between gender archaeology and mainstream archaeology and differences between the two are discussed. The paper further addresses current research trends within the humanities placing an increased emphasis on publications in leading peer-reviewed journals. Since the paper shows that gender research is poorly represented in such periodicals the author urges archaeologists interested in gender to publish in these journals.

  • 68.
    Back Danielsson, Ing-Marie
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur.
    Norsborg och Skrävsta i Botkyrka.: Makt i monument och materiell kultur.1998Ingår i: Aktuell arkeologi VI, Stockholms universitet , 1998, s. 31-40Kapitel i bok, del av antologi (Refereegranskat)
  • 69.
    Back Danielsson, Ing-Marie
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur.
    Om Pettersson, samiska trummor och Hitlers bunker. Bland annat.2000Ingår i: Texter om arkeologisk kulturmiljövård, Göteborgs universitet , 2000, s. 1-16Kapitel i bok, del av antologi (Refereegranskat)
  • 70.
    Back Danielsson, Ing-Marie
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur.
    Presenting the past: On archaeologists and their influence on modern burial practices2011Ingår i: Mortality, ISSN 1357-6275, E-ISSN 1469-9885, Vol. 16, nr 2, s. 98-112Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper demonstrates how antiquarians and archaeologists have influenced the burial practices of their times. They have encouraged the re-invention of prehistoric monuments in contemporary burial practices and also been involved in introducing the practice of modern cremation. Whereas antiquarians encouraged the upper-class stratum of society to reuse prehistoric material culture, their nineteenth century successors, archaeologists, turned to another audience. By focussing in greater detail on the earliest archaeologists and their endeavours to make archaeology a subject of public interest, it is revealed how they facilitated the re-invention of prehistoric material culture. For instance, bautas (a prehistoric memory stone for a deceased) became popular in the late nineteenth century, and it was also a category of sepulchral objects that the wealthier working class could afford. Hereby it is further shown how archaeology is an integral part of society, and not, as commonly argued within the history of archaeology, a discipline which in its interpretation of prehistory is influenced from a societal ‘outside’.

  • 71.
    Back Danielsson, Ing-Marie
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur.
    Review of “Prehistoric Pictures”2006Ingår i: Fornvännen, s. 45-47Artikel, recension (Refereegranskat)
  • 72.
    Back Danielsson, Ing-Marie
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur.
    Review of the book “The Excavations at Wijnaldum. Reports on Frisia in Roman and Medieval Times”2002Ingår i: FornvännenArtikel, recension (Refereegranskat)
  • 73.
    Back Danielsson, Ing-Marie
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur.
    Sense and Sensibility: Masking Practices in Late Iron Age Boat-Graves.2010Ingår i: Making Sense of Things.: Archaeologies of Sensory Perception. / [ed] Fahlander, Fredrik and Kjellström, Anna, Stockholm: Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Stockholm University , 2010, 400, s. 121-140Kapitel i bok, del av antologi (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
    Abstract [en]

    Swedish boat-graves, especially those from Valsgärde and Vendel, have been the subject of many investigations and extensive research since their discoveries in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries (e.g. Stolpe & Arne 1912; Arwidsson 1942, 1954, 1977; Lindqvist 1950; Herschend 1997, 2003; Seiler 2001, Schönbäck 2002; Norr (ed.) 2008). The helmets retrieved from these burials are the focus of this paper, and these have been analysed with particular consideration for their role in sensory engagement – both for the person wearing the helmet and for those experiencing it from the outside.

    The paper starts off with a short presentation of the boat-graves and the helmets therein, after which follows an equally short introduction of masking practices and the significance of masking practices during the Late Iron Age in Scandinavia. A more detailed discussion of the helmets of the boat-graves and their connection with sensual activities, the main theme of the paper, follows. Finally, a broader interpretation of the boat-graves themselves is offered and, lastly, conclusions are presented.

  • 74.
    Back Danielsson, Ing-Marie
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur.
    The Rape of the Lock: Or a Comparison between Miniature Images of the Eighth and Eighteenth Centuries2012Ingår i: Encountering Imagery: Materialities, Perceptions, Relations / [ed] Ing-Marie Back Danielsson, Fredrik Fahlander, Ylva Sjöstrand, Stockholm: Stockholm University, 2012, s. 29-49Kapitel i bok, del av antologi (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper discusses Scandinavian gold foil figures from the early part of the Scandinavian Late Iron Age (AD 550-1050) as well as miniature portrait pendants of the eighteenth century. The paper examines the possibility of comparing the two categories of objects, and what may be gained by contrasting historic and prehistoric images. The comparison is made through using Mitchell’s concept meta-picture as a theoretical tool. It is highlighted that the relationality between image and beholder is decisive for how respective objects were comprehended and treated. However, despite the fact that the two analyzed materials were part of different scopic regimes and regimes of practice, they share vitalistic and/or animistic characteristics.

  • 75.
    Back Danielsson, Ing-Marie
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur.
    (Un)Masking Gender: Gold Foil (Dis)Embodiments in Late Iron Age Scandinavia2002Ingår i: Thinking Through the Body, 2002Kapitel i bok, del av antologi (Refereegranskat)
  • 76.
    Back Danielsson, Ing-Marie
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur.
    Fahlander, FredrikStockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur.Sjöstrand, YlvaStockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur.
    Encountering Imagery: Materialities, Perceptions, Relations2012Samlingsverk (redaktörskap) (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Pictorial and visual elements are special types of archaeological data that transgress boundaries: between us and the past and between the material and immaterial. Traditionally, images have been discussed in terms of what they represent, mean or symbolize. In this volume, the authors explore other ways in which images aect and engage the beholder and the modes in which they are entangled in past worlds. The articles comprise examples from various regions and time periods and include a diverse array of topics including northern European rock art of the Neolithic and Bronze Age, anthropomorphic aspects of ceramic pots and figures in gold, erotic themes on children’s burial vessels, and nineteenth-century rock art created by quarantined sailors in Australia.

  • 77.
    Back Danielsson, Ing-Marie
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur.
    Fahlander, Fredrik
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur.
    Sjöstrand, Ylva
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur.
    Imagery beyond Representation2012Ingår i: Encountering Imagery: Materialities, Perceptions, Relations / [ed] Ing-Marie Back Danielsson, Fredrik Fahlander, Ylva Sjöstrand, Stockholm: Stockholm University, 2012, s. 1-12Kapitel i bok, del av antologi (Refereegranskat)
  • 78.
    Back Danielsson, Ing-Marie
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur.
    Gustin, Ingrid
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur.
    Larsson, Annika
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur.
    Myrberg, Nanouschka
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur.
    Thedéen, Susanne
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur.
    Preface2009Övrigt (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
  • 79.
    Back Danielsson, Ing-Marie
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur.
    Thedéen, Susanne
    Gender Questions2012Ingår i: To Tender Gender: The Pasts and Futures of Gender Research / [ed] Ing-Marie Back Danielsson, Susanne Thedéen, Stockholm: Stockholm University, 2012, s. 9-16Kapitel i bok, del av antologi (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
  • 80.
    Back Danielsson, Ing-Marie
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur.
    Thedéen, Susanne
    To Tender Gender: The Pasts and Futures of Gender Research in Archaeology2012Samlingsverk (redaktörskap) (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Almost thirty years have passed since gender studies entered archaeological discourse in earnest. What is the current status of gender research? One of the aims of this book is to contribute to answering this and other related questions. Another is to shed some light on the pasts and possible futures of gender research. Contributions deal with publication statistics in journals over the last thirty years, neo-realist discussions of Mayan body-politic, intersectional analyses of current Swedish museum exhibitions and Viking Periodbox brooches, masculinities in practice at a cultural heritage site, Viking period bodily abilities and disabilities and experiments regarding how once-lived bodies and lives may be materialized.

  • 81.
    Back-Danielsson, Ing-Marie
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur, Arkeologi.
    Gustin, IngridStockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur, Arkeologi.Larsson, AnnikaStockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur, Arkeologi.Myhrberg, NanouschkaStockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur, Arkeologi.Thedéen, SusanneStockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur, Arkeologi.
    Döda personers sällskap: Gravmaterialens identiteter och kulturella uttryck2009Proceedings (redaktörskap) (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
  • 82.
    Bartosiewicz, Laszlo
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur, Osteoarkeologiska forskningslaboratoriet.
    A honfoglalás és kora Árpád-kori állattartás régészeti emlékei [Archaeological evidence of animal keeping in the time of the Hungarian Conquest and Period of the Árpád Dynasty]2017Ingår i: Hétköznapok a honfoglalás korában / [ed] Petkes Zsolt, Sudár Balázs, Helikon Kiadó , 2017, s. 52-58Kapitel i bok, del av antologi (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
  • 83.
    Bartosiewicz, Laszlo
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur, Osteoarkeologiska forskningslaboratoriet.
    A régészeti állattan "állatorvosi lova"2018Ingår i: Sötét idők túlélői: A kontinuitás fogalma, kutatásának módszerei az 5–11. századi Kárpát-medence régészetében: 2014-ben Debrecenben megrendezett konferencia kiadványa / [ed] Tamara Katalin Hága, Barbara Kolozsi, Debrecen: Déri Múzeum Régészeti Tár , 2018, s. 83-107Kapitel i bok, del av antologi (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
  • 84.
    Bartosiewicz, Laszlo
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur, Osteoarkeologiska forskningslaboratoriet.
    Animal Remains in the Avar cemetery of Szegvár-Szőlőkalja2018Ingår i: Lebenswelten zwischen Archäologie und Geschichte: Festschrift für Falko Daim zu seinem 65. Geburtstag / [ed] Jörg Drauschke et al., Mainz: Verlag des Römisch-Germanischen Zentralmuseums , 2018, s. 43-56Kapitel i bok, del av antologi (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
  • 85.
    Bartosiewicz, Laszlo
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur, Osteoarkeologiska forskningslaboratoriet.
    "Forever young": neoteny and design2018Ingår i: Annalen des Naturhistorischen Museums in Wien, Serie A., ISSN 0255-0091, nr 120, s. 19-30Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    The evolutionary relevance of neoteny, the concept that adults displaying youthful proportions evoke caregiving instincts, has frequently been questioned. The biological roots of the problem lead to the expression of age, sex and inheritance in size and shape. Formalist interpretations, however, can be misleading as the idea itself is anthropocentric. This weakness (in natural science) makes historic reflections on neoteny more interesting in material culture shaped by humans themselves. Archaeozoological examples include animal breeds, especially dogs. The attraction to "youthful" proportions also seems to have been exploited in both the creative and applied arts. Researchers of this eminently interdisciplinary subject cannot ignore overarching questions regarding complex and mutual interactions between nature and culture.

  • 86.
    Bartosiewicz, Laszlo
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur, Osteoarkeologiska forskningslaboratoriet.
    Hungarian grey cattle: Parallels in constituting animal and human identities2018Ingår i: Interspecies Interactions: Animals and Humans between the Middle Ages and Modernity / [ed] Sarah Cockram, Andrew Wells, London: Routledge, 2018, s. 190-213Kapitel i bok, del av antologi (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
  • 87.
    Bartosiewicz, Laszlo
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur, Osteoarkeologiska forskningslaboratoriet.
    Hunting injuries in prehistoric game2016Ingår i: Southeast Europe and Anatolia in prehistory : Essays in honor of Vassil Nikolov on his 65th anniversary / [ed] K. Bacvarov, R. Gleser, Bonn: Verlag Dr. Rudolf Habelt GMBH, 2016, s. 501-508Kapitel i bok, del av antologi (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
  • 88.
    Bartosiewicz, Laszlo
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur, Osteoarkeologiska forskningslaboratoriet.
    Like a Headless Chicken: Meaning, Medium and Context in Medieval Urban Taphonomy2017Ingår i: Animaltown: beasts in medieval urban space / [ed] Alice M. Choyke, Gerhard Jaritz, Oxford: BAR Publishing , 2017, s. 19-26Kapitel i bok, del av antologi (Refereegranskat)
  • 89.
    Bartosiewicz, Laszlo
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur, Osteoarkeologiska forskningslaboratoriet.
    Resurrecting Roe Deer: Skeletal Weight Ratios At Prehistoric Paks–Gyapa, Hungary2017Ingår i: From Hunter-Gatherers to Farmers: Human adaptations at the end of the Pleistocene and the first part of the Holocene / [ed] Mărgărit, M. and Boroneanț, A., Targoviște: Editura Cetatea de Scaun , 2017, s. 465-481Kapitel i bok, del av antologi (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
  • 90.
    Bartosiewicz, Laszlo
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur, Osteoarkeologiska forskningslaboratoriet.
    The ghost in the corridor…: Some remarks on “Animal Secondary Products”, edited by Haskel J. Greenfield2015Ingår i: Germania, ISSN 0016-8874, Vol. 93, s. 233-245Artikel i tidskrift (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
  • 91.
    Bartosiewicz, Laszlo
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur, Osteoarkeologiska forskningslaboratoriet.
    The palaeopathology of wild mammals in archaeology = Vadon élő emlősállatok betegségei a régészetben2016Ingår i: Archeometriai Műhely, ISSN 1786-271X, Vol. 13, nr 1, s. 19-30Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Domestication is known to have increased animal morbidity. Wild animals, however, should not be looked upon romantically like Jean-Jacques Rousseau’s “noble sauvage”, untainted by civilisation. Rare pathological lesions found on the bones of wild animals in archaeozoological assemblages, they offer valuable information both from a zoological and a archaeological point of view. In addition to discussing problems of sampling, this paper is a review of major factors such as taphonomy, environment, and heritability that determine the manifestation of disease in wild animals in archaeological assemblages. A simple classification, specifically developed for wild animals, is presented that helps better understand these conditions. Numerous examples from both the author’s own work and the broad base of international literature (especially on Europe and the Southwest Asia) are cited to help illustrate how disease is manifested on the bones of wild animals recovered from a variety of archaeological periods. The results of this paper show that although domestication undoubtedly brought about an increase in animal morbidity, depending on the chances of survival of a game species and the functional importance of the body part affected, a variety of pathological lesions regularly occur on the remains of wild animals as well.

  • 92.
    Bartosiewicz, Laszlo
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur, Osteoarkeologiska forskningslaboratoriet.
    Zooarchaeology in the Carpathian Basin and adjacent areas2017Ingår i: The Oxford Handbook of Zooarchaeology / [ed] Umberto Albarella, Mauro Rizzetto, Hannah Russ, Kim Vickers, Sarah Viner-Daniels, New York: Oxford University Press, 2017, s. 99-112Kapitel i bok, del av antologi (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
    Abstract [en]

    The Carpathian Basin, situated between the Alps, the Carpathians, and the Dinaric Alps, has been a geographically and culturally diverse area throughout its history. Research intensity in all periods and places is likewise heterogeneous. A complete review of animal–human relationships is, thus, impossible. Following a historical overview of research, characteristic examples of animal exploitation between the Neolithic and the early eighteenth century will be highlighted. Special emphasis is placed on the way migrations and imperial politics impacted the composition of animal bone assemblages. The role of animals in self-representation and other forms of symbolic communication are also considered.

  • 93.
    Bartosiewicz, Laszlo
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur, Osteoarkeologiska forskningslaboratoriet.
    Bonsall, Clive
    Herd mentality2018Ingår i: Social Dimensions of Food in the Prehistoric Balkans / [ed] Social dimensMaria Ivanova, Bogdan Athanassov, Vanya Petrova, Desislava Takorova, Philipp W. Stockhammer, Oxford: Oxbow Books, 2018Kapitel i bok, del av antologi (Refereegranskat)
  • 94.
    Bartosiewicz, Laszlo
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur, Osteoarkeologiska forskningslaboratoriet.
    Choyke, Alice M.
    Reynolds, Ffion
    Stag do: ritual implications of antler use in prehistory2017Ingår i: The Neolithic of Europe: papers in honour of Alasdair Whittle / [ed] Penny Bickle, Vicki Cummings, Daniela Hofmann, Joshua Pollard, Oxford: Oxbow Books, 2017, s. 107-119Kapitel i bok, del av antologi (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
  • 95.
    Bartosiewicz, Laszlo
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur, Osteoarkeologiska forskningslaboratoriet.
    Gál, Erika
    Ottoman Turkish influences on animal exploitation in 16th-17th century Hungary2018Ingår i: Archaeozoology of the Near East XII: proceedings of the 12th international symposium of the ICAZ Archaeozoology of Southwest Asia and Adjacent Areas Working Group, Groningen Institute of Archaeology, June 14-15 2015 / [ed] Canan Çakırlar, Jwana Chahoud, Rémi Berthon, Susan Pilaar Birch, Groningen: Barkhuis Publishing & University of Groningen , 2018, s. 191-206Kapitel i bok, del av antologi (Refereegranskat)
  • 96.
    Bartosiewicz, Laszlo
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur, Osteoarkeologiska forskningslaboratoriet.
    Lisk, Elicia
    Zohar, Irit
    Non-mammalian Vertebrate Remains2018Ingår i: Quedem Reports, ISSN 0793-4289, Vol. 10, s. 119-128Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
  • 97.
    Bartosiewicz, Laszlo
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur, Osteoarkeologiska forskningslaboratoriet.
    Nyerges, Éva Ágnes
    Prehistoric Animal Remains from Grotta Scaloria2016Ingår i: Archaeology of Grotta Scaloria: Ritual in Neolithic Southeast Italy / [ed] Ernestine S. Elster, Eugenia Isetti, John Robb, Antonella Traverso, Los Angeles: University of New Mexico Press , 2016, s. 75-90Kapitel i bok, del av antologi (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
  • 98.
    Bartosiewicz, Laszlo
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur, Osteoarkeologiska forskningslaboratoriet.
    Swift, Keith
    Coleman Carter, Joseph
    Animal Remains from the Sanctuary and Adjacent Areas at Pantanello2018Ingår i: The chora of Metaponto 7: The Greek Sanctuary at Pantanello, volume I : The excavation and site / [ed] Joseph Coleman Carter, Keith Swift, Austin: University of Texas Press, 2018, s. 447-464Kapitel i bok, del av antologi (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
  • 99.
    Bartosiewicz, László
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur, Osteoarkeologiska forskningslaboratoriet.
    Animal remains from the late medieval castellum of Őcsény-Oltovány, Southern Hungary2016Ingår i: “per sylvam et per lacus nimios” The Medieval and Ottoman Period in Southern Transdanubia, Southwest Hungary: The Contribution of the Natural Sciences / [ed] Gyöngyi Kovács, Csilla Zatykó, Budapest: Institute of Archaeology Research Centre for the Humanities Hungarian Academy of Sciences , 2016, s. 155-176Kapitel i bok, del av antologi (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
  • 100.
    Bartosiewicz, László
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur, Osteoarkeologiska forskningslaboratoriet.
    Környezet okozta állatbetegségek a régészetben2016Ingår i: Természet Világa, ISSN 0040-3717, Vol. 147, s. 40-45Artikel i tidskrift (Övrig (populärvetenskap, debatt, mm))
1234567 51 - 100 av 1398
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