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  • 601.
    Van Meerbergen, Sara
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Baltic Languages, Finnish and German, Dutch.
    Nederlandse prentenboeken worden Zweeds: Een multimodale vertaalanalyse2011In: de Leeswelp, ISSN 1780-3845, Vol. 17, no 1, p. 32-35Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    This article is written in Dutch and discusses some of the main issues in my doctoral thesis "Nederländska bilderböcker blir svenska. En multimodal översättningsanalys" (2010). The thesis deals with the translation of Dutch and Flemish picture books between 1995 and 2006. It includes a general bibliographical study and also a more detailed translation analysis about the Miffy-books by Dutch picture book artits Dick Bruna. In order to analyse how both words and images are translated, multimodal text analysis is integrated as a tool in the translation analysis.

  • 602.
    Vejdemo, Susanne
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Hörberg, Thomas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Semantic Factors Predict the Rate of Lexical Replacement of Content Words2016In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 11, no 1, article id e0147924Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The rate of lexical replacement estimates the diachronic stability of word forms on the basis of how frequently a proto-language word is replaced or retained in its daughter languages. Lexical replacement rate has been shown to be highly related to word class and word frequency. In this paper, we argue that content words and function words behave differently with respect to lexical replacement rate, and we show that semantic factors predict the lexical replacement rate of content words. For the 167 content items in the Swadesh list, data was gathered on the features of lexical replacement rate, word class, frequency, age of acquisition, synonyms, arousal, imageability and average mutual information, either from published databases or gathered from corpora and lexica. A linear regression model shows that, in addition to frequency, synonyms, senses and imageability are significantly related to the lexical replacement rate of content words–in particular the number of synonyms that a word has. The model shows no differences in lexical replacement rate between word classes, and outperforms a model with word class and word frequency predictors only.

  • 603. Vejdemo-Johansson, Mikael
    et al.
    Vejdemo, Susanne
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Ek, Carl-Henrik
    Comparing Distributions of Color Words: Pitfalls and Metric Choices2014In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 9, no 2, p. e89184-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Computational methods have started playing a significant role in semantic analysis. One particularly accessible area for developing good computational methods for linguistic semantics is in color naming, where perceptual dissimilarity measures provide a geometric setting for the analyses. This setting has been studied first by Berlin & Kay in 1969, and then later on by a large data collection effort: the World Color Survey (WCS). From the WCS, a dataset on color naming by 2 616 speakers of 110 different languages is made available for further research. In the analysis of color naming from WCS, however, the choice of analysis method is an important factor of the analysis. We demonstrate concrete problems with the choice of metrics made in recent analyses of WCS data, and offer approaches for dealing with the problems we can identify. Picking a metric for the space of color naming distributions that ignores perceptual distances between colors assumes a decorrelated system, where strong spatial correlations in fact exist. We can demonstrate that the corresponding issues are significantly improved when using Earth Mover's Distance, or Quadratic x-square Distance, and we can approximate these solutions with a kernel-based analysis method.

  • 604.
    Veselinova, Ljuba
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Negative existentials: a cross linguistic study2013In: Rivista di Linguistica = Italian Journal of Linguistics, ISSN 1120-2726, Vol. 25, no 1, p. 107-145Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study is to provide a cross-linguistic outline of the negation strategies in existential predications like ‘There are no mice in the basement’. It is found that there is a strong cross-linguistic tendency to use a special negation strategy in these predications. Furthermore, the special negators, labelled here ‘negative existentials’, show a number of similarities in terms of their semantics, morphosyntax, use and diachronic origin. In light of this, it is suggested that they represent a linguistic construction of its own, and in fact, a separate conceptual domain.

  • 605.
    Veselinova, Ljuba
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    The Negative Existential Cycle Revisited2014In: Linguistics, ISSN 2072-8379, Vol. 52, no 6, p. 1327-1389Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Based on crosslinguistic data and the postulation of six language types, the Negative Existential Cycle was proposed by Croft (1991) as a way of modeling the evolution of standard negation markers from existential negators. The current investigation tests this model by applying it to two language families, Slavonic and Polynesian, checking which cycle types are instantiated in these families and outlining pathways of transition between different types. In Slavonic, we observe one type without variation and two types with internal variation. All cycle types are instantiated in Polynesian, which is correlated with characteristics specific to this family. Three pathways are outlined for the partial or complete transfer of negative existentials into the verbal domain. The first is contingent on negative existentials being used in specific constructions and the direct inheritance or expansion of use of these constructions; the second involves negative existentials being used as emphatic negators external to the proposition and their subsequent reanalysis as clause internal negators without any additional pragmatic content. The third pathway, observed in Polynesian only, is through subordination processes leading to the re-interpretation of negative existentials as general markers of negation. Additionally, a time dimension needs to be added when modeling this cycle, as its completion, i.e., the negative existential turning into a full-fledged marker of standard negation, appears to take longer than 2,000 years.

  • 606.
    Vesterinen, Rainer
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Spanish, Portuguese and Latin American Studies.
    Complementos finitos e infinitivos dos verbos causativos deixar e fazer: Causação directa vs. indirecta e a noção de controlo2008In: Studia Neophilologica, ISSN 0039-3274, E-ISSN 1651-2308, Vol. 80, no 1, p. 75-98Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    No presente estudo, realiza-se uma análise qualitativa sobre os complementos finitos e infinitivos dos verbos causativos deixar e fazer no Português Europeu. A partir de uma visão cognitiva da língua, a Gramática Cognitiva de Langacker (1987, 1991), propõe-se que a diferença entre os complementos em causa é de carácter icónico e que pode ser explicada por uma distinção feita entre causação directa e indirecta, e pelo grau de controlo sobre o evento descrito no complemento. Assim, argumenta-se que os complementos infinitivos assinalam uma causação directa, enquanto os finitos implicam uma causação indirecta. Em consequência disso, os complementos infinitivos dão a entender um maior grau de controlo sobre o evento completivo do que os complementos finitos.

  • 607.
    Vesterinen, Rainer
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Romance Studies and Classics.
    Estruturas causativas no Português: Um estudo sobre a relação entre o modo conjuntivo e os conceitos de subjetificação e domínio2013In: Revista Portuguesa de Humanidades, ISSN 0874-0321, Vol. 17, no 1, p. 97-120Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Studies carried out within a cognitive-functional perspective of linguistic analysisdistinguish a relation between the structural properties of complements of causationverbs and the kind of causation they designate. The present paper follows this lineof investigation. However, the focus of the analysis is put on the relation between thesubjunctive mood and the concepts of subjectification and dominion in causativestructures. The hypothesis put forward is that the relation between the Portuguesecausation verbs fazer and deixar, on the one hand, and the subjunctive complement, onthe other, can be can be explained in terms of subjectification, i.e. a diminished degreeof subject control. Accordingly, it is argued that the subjunctive mood designates anevent that is located outside the conceptualizer’s dominion.

  • 608.
    Vesterinen, Rainer
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Romance Studies and Classics.
    Extending the dominion of effective control: Its applicability to mood choice in Spanish and Portuguese2014In: Cognitive Linguistics, ISSN 0936-5907, E-ISSN 1613-3641, Vol. 25, no 4, p. 583-616Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Within the model of Cognitive Grammar, the concept of dominion is fundamental to the analysis of the conceptualizer’s attitude toward an event or a proposition. However, the concept has, first and foremost, been understood in epistemic terms, whereas there has been less concern with the conceptualizer’s efforts to influence and manipulate the course of events in the world. This being so, the present paper shows that the conceptualizer’s dominion of effective control is relevant in a number of linguistic contexts. The analysis provides evidence for this particular feature in factive contexts, deontic contexts, contexts of volition and causation, and in adverbial clauses of purpose, manner and condition. The analysis further shows that the conceptualizer’s dominion of effective control is capable of providing a conceptually grounded explanation for the occurrence of the Spanish and the Portuguese subjunctive mood in these grammatical contexts.

  • 609.
    Vesterinen, Rainer
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Romance Studies and Classics.
    Factividade e modo verbal2014In: Revue Romane, ISSN 0035-3906, E-ISSN 1600-0811, Vol. 49, no 1, p. 52-67Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The traditional way of explaining the subjunctive mood in Portuguese is utterly related to the distinction made between reality and non-reality. That is, while the indicative mood has been explained in terms of reality, the subjunctive has been the mood of non-reality. Although this explanation covers many occurrences of the subjunctive mood, it is also recognized that it fails to explain the use of the subjunctive mood in factive contexts. This being so, the present study aims at explaining the variation between the indicative and subjunctive mood in factive contexts from a Cognitive Grammar perspective. The hypothesis put forward is that the mood variation can be explained in terms of dominion and control. Thus, it is claimed that the subjunctive mood in factive contexts can be explained by a reduced degree of active control, this being consistent with an event that is located outside the conceptualizer’s dominion of effective control. On the other hand, the indicative mood occurs in contexts of epistemic control that are located inside the conceptualizer’s epistemic dominion. An additional analysis of the subjunctive mood in other grammatical contexts corroborates the initial claim.

  • 610.
    Vesterinen, Rainer
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Spanish, Portuguese and Latin American Studies.
    Impersonals with ser ('to be') and the dominion of effective control2014In: Language sciences (Oxford), ISSN 0388-0001, E-ISSN 1873-5746, Vol. 41, p. 143-152Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The present paper analyses the semantic meaning of the subjunctive mood in complements of deontic and evaluative impersonal expressions. From the perspective of Cognitive Grammar, it is argued that the meaning of the subjunctive mood is to designate events that are located outside the conceptualizer’s dominion, whereas the impersonal expression puts focus on the relevant dominion, i.e. the dominion of effective control. Thus, the analysis shows that there is a conceptual relation between the conceptual content of the impersonal expression, on the one hand, and occurrence of the subjunctive mood, on the other hand. An additional analysis concerns the occurrence and the meaning of the inflected infinitive in contexts that imply a low degree of effective control.

  • 611.
    Vesterinen, Rainer
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Romance Studies and Classics.
    Instructions or dominion?: The meaning of the Spanish subjunctive mood2013In: Pragmatics & Cognition, ISSN 0929-0907, E-ISSN 1569-9943, Vol. 21, no 2, p. 359-379Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In a highly interesting study, Dam and Dam-Jensen (2010) put forward the idea that the indicative and the subjunctive mood in Spanish complementizer phrases can be explained by the instructions they convey. The indicative instructs the addressee to locate the situation created by the verb relative to the situation of utterance, whereas the subjunctive instructs the addressee not to locate the situation described by the verb relative to the situation of utterance. Although this explanation is most appealing, the present paper argues that it also may create explanatory problems. Thus, it is claimed that the notion of dominion can explain the semantic meaning of the Spanish subjunctive mood. This verbal mood designates events that are located outside the conceptualizer’s dominion, either in terms of epistemic control or in terms of effective control.

  • 612.
    Vesterinen, Rainer
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Romance Studies and Classics.
    Mood choice in complements of Spanish comprender and Portuguese compreender (‘understand’) – distribution and meaning2017In: Languages in Contrast: International Journal for Contrastive Linguistics, ISSN 1387-6759, E-ISSN 1569-9897, Vol. 17, no 2, p. 279-302Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The present paper analyzes the occurrence of indicative and subjunctive complements of the verbs comprender (Spanish) and compreender (Portuguese) in European Spanish and European Portuguese. A quantitative analysis based on 400 occurrences of the complements randomly selected from the newspaper genre shows that the indicative mood occurs more frequently than the subjunctive mood in both languages, although the subjunctive mood is more frequent in the Portuguese corpus than in the Spanish one. The analysis also shows that the occurrence of the subjunctive complement is highly restricted to contexts in which the subject of the main clause verb is either 1st person or 3rd person singular. From the theoretical perspective of Cognitive Grammar, the mood alternation is explained by the concept of dominion, i.e. the indicative complement designates an event that is located within the conceptualizer’s epistemic dominion, whereas the subjunctive complement designates an event that is located outside the conceptualizer’s dominion of effective control.

  • 613.
    Vesterinen, Rainer
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Spanish, Portuguese and Latin American Studies.
    O modo verbal em expressões impessoais com o verbo ser2012In: Revue Romane, ISSN 0035-3906, E-ISSN 1600-0811, Vol. 47, no 1, p. 76-97Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The subjunctive mood has frequently been explained in terms of unreality, presupposition, non-assertion and the distinction between new and old information. Although these explanations offer a partial account of the semantics of this mood, it is shown that many occurrences of the subjunctive mood remain unexplained. This being so, the present paper aims at explaining the indicative and subjunctive mood in impersonal expressions with the verb ser from a Cognitive Grammar perspective of linguistic analysis. The analysis shows that the variation between the indicative and subjunctive mood in this grammatical context can be explained in terms of dominion and control. An extension of the analysis further shows that it may account for the occurrence of the subjunctive mood in other grammatical contexts.

  • 614.
    Vesterinen, Rainer
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Romance Studies and Classics.
    The Portuguese Future Subjunctive: A Dominion Analysis2017In: Review of Cognitive Linguistics, ISSN 1877-9751, E-ISSN 1877-976X, Vol. 15, no 1, p. 58-82Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Although the analysis of the Portuguese future subjunctive mood would contribute to a greater understanding of the general meaning of the subjunctive mood, this verb form has received considerably little attention compared to the other subjunctive forms, namely, the past and present subjunctives. The aim of the present paper is to fill this gap. Using the theoretical perspective of Cognitive Grammar, it will be shown that the Portuguese future subjunctive shares many characteristic features with other tenses of the subjunctive mood. In particular, the analysis shows that the Portuguese future subjunctive can be explained by the concept of dominion. Thus, the present paper provides a conceptually grounded and unified explanation for the meaning of the Portuguese subjunctive mood.

  • 615.
    Vogel, Anna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism.
    Laddade ord2011In: Språktidningen, ISSN 1654-5028Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 616.
    Vogel, Anna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism.
    Laddade ord2010In: Populär kommunikation, ISSN 1402-2567Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 617.
    Vogel, Anna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Scandinavian Languages.
    Tranströmer visar världen på nytt2014In: Språktidningen, ISSN 1654-5028, no 11Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 618. Von Mentzer, Cecilia Nakeva
    et al.
    Lyxell, Björn
    Sahlén, Birgitta
    Dahlström, Örjan
    Lindgren, Magnus
    Ors, Marianne
    Kallioinen, Petter
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics.
    Engström, Elisabet
    Uhlén, Inger
    Segmental and suprasegmental properties in nonword repetition - An explorative study of the associations with nonword decoding in children with normal hearing and children with bilateral cochlear implants2015In: Clinical Linguistics & Phonetics, ISSN 0269-9206, E-ISSN 1464-5076, Vol. 29, no 3, p. 216-235Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study explored nonword repetition (NWR) and nonword decoding in normal-hearing (NH) children and in children with bilateral cochlear implants (CI). Participants were 11 children, with CI, 5:0-7:11 years (M = 6.5 years), and 11 NH children, individually age-matched to the children with CI. This study fills an important gap in research, since it thoroughly describes detailed aspects of NWR and nonword decoding and their possible associations. All children were assessed after having practiced with a computer-assisted reading intervention with a phonics approach during four weeks. Results showed that NH children outperformed children with CI on the majority of aspects of NWR. The analysis of syllable number in NWR revealed that children with CI made more syllable omissions than did the NH children, and predominantly in prestressed positions. In addition, the consonant cluster analysis in NWR showed significantly more consonant omissions and substitutions in children with CI suggesting that reaching fine-grained levels of phonological processing was particularly difficult for these children. No significant difference was found for nonword-decoding accuracy between the groups, as measured by whole words correct and phonemes correct, but differences were observed regarding error patterns. In children with CI phoneme, deletions occurred significantly more often than in children with NH. The correlation analysis revealed that the ability to repeat consonant clusters in NWR had the strongest associations to nonword decoding in both groups. The absence of as frequent significant associations between NWR and nonword decoding in children with CI compared to children with NH suggest that these children partly use other decoding strategies to compensate for less precise phonological knowledge, for example, lexicalizations in nonword decoding, specifically, making a real word of a nonword.

  • 619. von Mentzer, Cecilia Nakeva
    et al.
    Lyxell, Björn
    Sahlén, Birgitta
    Dahlström, Örjan
    Lindgren, Magnus
    Ors, Marianne
    Kallioinen, Petter
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics.
    Uhlén, Inger
    Computer-assisted reading intervention with a phonics approach for children using cochlear implants or hearing aids2014In: Scandinavian Journal of Psychology, ISSN 0036-5564, E-ISSN 1467-9450, Vol. 55, no 5, p. 448-455Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The present study examined computer-assisted reading intervention with a phonics approach for deaf and hard of hearing (DHH) children in Sweden using cochlear implants or hearing aids, or a combination of both. The study included 48 children, 5, 6 and 7years of age. Sixteen children with normal hearing (NH) served as a reference group. The first purpose of the study was to compare NH and DHH children's reading ability at pre and post-intervention. The second purpose was to investigate effects of the intervention. Cognitive and demographic factors were analyzed in relation to reading improvement. Results showed no statistically significant difference for reading ability at the group level, although NH children showed overall higher reading scores at both test points. Age comparisons revealed a statistically significant higher reading ability in the NH 7-year-olds compared to the DHH 7-year-olds. The intervention proved successful for word decoding accuracy, passage comprehension and as a reduction of nonword decoding errors in both NH and DHH children. Reading improvement was associated with complex working memory and phonological processing skills in NH children. Correspondent associations were observed with visual working memory and letter knowledge in the DHH children. Age was the only demographic factor that was significantly correlated with reading improvement. The results suggest that DHH children's beginning reading may be influenced by visual strategies that might explain the reading delay in the older children.

  • 620.
    Vuorsola, Lasse
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Slavic and Baltic Studies, Finnish, Dutch, and German, Finnish.
    Societal support for the educational provisions of Finnish in the Swedish school system in theory and practice2019In: Language Policy, ISSN 1568-4555, E-ISSN 1573-1863, Vol. 18, no 3, p. 363-385Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Language policy has an impact both on societies and on individuals, especially in contexts where negative ideologies toward minorities and minority languages may exist. A functional language policy protects a minority and allows it to develop its culture and language, while an ineffective policy might cause irreparable damage and lead to language attrition and even complete loss of language. The development of Finnish in Sweden from a language policy perspective has been fairly positive since the mid-1990s, especially when it comes to the establishment and strengthening of the legal and regulatory support in international conventions and domestic legislation. Despite these improvements there have been practical negative developments, which are symbolised in the closing down of a bilingual independent school in Gothenburg in 2016. The closing of the schools signal opposing tendencies in the treatment of Finnish in Sweden. In this paper I will examine how supranational and national language policies are implemented locally in Gothenburg and how this implementation reveals how well the policies function and what role ideologies play in the implementation. I discuss how different levels of policymaking and application contribute to the current status of the Sweden Finnish minority and Sweden Finnish as a minority language by employing Richard Ruiz’s three orientations to language planning (Ruiz 1984; Hult and Hornberger 2016) in tandem with Irvine & Gal’s concept of erasure and critical discourse analysis. I exemplify how the language policies work by studying interviews and media reporting from the field. I examine how the different discourses are in conflict with each other and what ramifications these discrepancies result in.

  • 621.
    Wallin, Lars
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Sign Language Section.
    Two kinds of productive signs in Swedish Sign Language: Polysynthetic signs and size and shape specifying signs2000In: Sign Language and Linguistics, ISSN 1387-9316, E-ISSN 1569-996X, Vol. 3, no 2, p. 237-256Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 622.
    Wikse Barrow, Carla
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics. Karolinska Institutet, Sweden.
    Nilsson Björkenstam, Kristina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Computational Linguistics.
    Strömbergsson, Sofia
    Subjective ratings of age-of-acquisition: exploring issues of validity and rater reliability2019In: Journal of Child Language, ISSN 0305-0009, E-ISSN 1469-7602, Vol. 46, no 2, p. 199-213Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study aimed to investigate concerns of validity and reliability in subjective ratings of age-of-acquisition (AoA), through exploring characteristics of the individual rater. An additional aim was to validate the obtained AoA ratings against two corpora – one of child speech and one of adult speech – specifically exploring whether words over-represented in the child-speech corpus are rated with lower AoA than words characteristic of the adult-speech corpus. The results show that less than one-third of participating informants’ ratings are valid and reliable. However, individuals with high familiarity with preschool-aged children provide more valid and reliable ratings, compared to individuals who do not work with or have children of their own. The results further show a significant, age-adjacent difference in rated AoA for words from the two different corpora, thus strengthening their validity. The study provides AoA data, of high specificity, for 100 child-specific and 100 adult-specific Swedish words.

  • 623.
    Wikén Bonde, Ingrid
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Baltic Languages, Finnish and German, German.
    Att översätta Freud: The how of the saying is also the what2011In: med andra ord, ISSN 1104-4462, no 69, p. 4-9Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 624. Williams, Quentin Emmanuel
    et al.
    Stroud, Christopher
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Centre for Research on Bilingualism. University of the Western Cape, South Africa.
    Multilingualism in transformative spaces: contact and conviviality2013In: Language Policy, ISSN 1568-4555, E-ISSN 1573-1863, Vol. 12, no 4, p. 289-311Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    South Africa is a highly mobile country characterized by historical displacements and contemporary mobilities, both social and demographic. Getting to grips with diversity, dislocation, relocation and anomie, as well as pursuing aspirations of mobility, is part of people's daily experience that often takes place on the margins of conventional politics. A politics of conviviality is one such form of politics of the popular that emerges in contexts of rapid change, diversity, mobility, and the negotiation and mediation of complex affiliations and attachments. The questions in focus for this paper thus pertain to how forms of talk, born out of displacement, anomie and contact in the superdiverse contexts of South Africa, allow for the articulation of life-styles and aspirations that break with the historical faultlines of social and racial oppression. We first expand upon the idea of (marginal) linguistic practices as powerful mediations of political voice and agency, an idea that can be captured in the notion of linguistic citizenship, the rhetorical foundation of a politics of conviviality. We then move on to analyze the workings of linguistic citizenship in the multilingual practices of two distinct manifestations of popular culture, namely hip hop and a performance by a stand-up comedian in Mzoli's meat market in Gugulethu, Cape Town. The paper concludes with a general discussion on the implications for politics of multilingualism and language policy.

  • 625.
    Williams, Quentin
    et al.
    University of Western Cape.
    Stroud, Christopher
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    Performing rap ciphas in late modern Cape Town: Extreme locality and multilingual citizenship2010In: Africa Focus, ISSN 0772084X, Vol. 23, no 2, p. 39-59Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The study of hip-hop in Cape Town, and indeed South Africa, has traditionally focused on the narratives and poetics of resistance, race and counter-hegemonic agency in the context of apartheid and the early days of post-apartheid. Despite this attention, hip-hop cipha performances remain relatively under-researched. The aim of this paper is to suggest that cipha performances display linguistic and discursive features that not only are of particular interest to rap music and hip-hop on the Cape Flats of Cape Town specifically, but that also engage core issues around multilingualism, agency and voice more generally. It demonstrates how in the process of entextualization a sense of locality, extreme locality, emerges in cipha performances by means of verbal cueing, representing place, expressing disrespect (dissing), and the (deictic) reference to local coordinates that is achieved by transposing or recontextualizing transidiomatic phrases, and by incorporating local proxemics and audience reactions through commentary and response. It concludes by suggestingthat competition around acceptable linguistic forms and framings (metalinguistic disputes) of extreme locality comprise the very micro-processes behind the formation of new registers. At the same time, these registers create the semiotic space for the exercise of agency and voice through multilingual practices, that is, multilingual citizenship.

  • 626.
    Williams, Sarah
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    Hammarberg, Björn
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Language switches in L3 production: Implications for a polyglot speaking model1998In: Applied Linguistics, ISSN 0142-6001, E-ISSN 1477-450X, Vol. 19, no 3, p. 295-333Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 627.
    Witt, Susanna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Slavic and Baltic Studies, Finnish, Dutch, and German.
    Institutionalized Intermediates: Conceptualizing Soviet Practices of Indirect Translation2017In: Translation Studies, ISSN 1478-1700, E-ISSN 1751-2921, Vol. 10, no 2, p. 166-182Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the Soviet Union, practices of indirect literary translation, particularly the use of interlinear intermediates, were institutionalized in the early 1930s through special terminology, specific administrative treatment within the literary apparatus, and educational efforts. Such practices continued until the end of the Soviet era, but were intensely debated and criticized, rendering problems of indirect translation both visible and articulated in a unique way. Drawing on archival sources, this article presents an overview of such issues, taking into consideration the heretofore scant attention given the subject in both Western and Russian scholarship. Conceptualizing the massive Soviet experience in the field, it aims at providing new perspectives on the phenomenon of indirect translation.

  • 628.
    Wlodarczak, Marcin
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics.
    Heldner, Mattias
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics.
    Respiratory Constraints in Verbal and Non-verbal Communication2017In: Frontiers in Psychology, ISSN 1664-1078, E-ISSN 1664-1078, Vol. 8, article id 708Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the present paper we address the old question of respiratory planning in speech production. We recast the problem in terms of speakers' communicative goals and propose that speakers try to minimize respiratory effort in line with the H&H theory. We analyze respiratory cycles coinciding with no speech (i.e., silence), short verbal feedback expressions (SFE's) as well as longer vocalizations in terms of parameters of the respiratory cycle and find little evidence for respiratory planning in feedback production. We also investigate timing of speech and SFEs in the exhalation and contrast it with nods. We find that while speech is strongly tied to the exhalation onset, SFEs are distributed much more uniformly throughout the exhalation and are often produced on residual air. Given that nods, which do not have any respiratory constraints, tend to be more frequent toward the end of an exhalation, we propose a mechanism whereby respiratory patterns are determined by the trade-off between speakers' communicative goals and respiratory constraints.

  • 629.
    Wälchli, Bernhard
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Non-specific, specific and obscured perception verbs in Baltic languages2016In: Baltic Linguistics, ISSN 2081-7533, Vol. 7, p. 53-135Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Opportunistic perception verbs (‘see’, ‘hear’, as opposed to explorative perception verbs, ‘look’, ‘listen’) express the opportunity for perception and are condition-oriented (exposure, i.e. the perceiver’s exposure to a percept), not participant-oriented, in their aspectual structure. The Baltic languages, as other languages in Central, East, and Northern Europe, have specific perception verbs, which are a subtype of opportunistic perception verbs, for the expression of restricted exposure. The lexical character of specificity in Baltic—unlike Russian where it is integrated into a rigid grammatical aspect system—is more favorable for uncovering the underlying semantic factors of specificity, which differ across perceptual systems. Restrictedness of exposure is a scale rather than a dichotomy, and cross-linguistic comparison in parallel texts reveals that specificity is a scale with much variation as to where the borderline between specific and non-specific perception verbs is drawn in the languages of the area. Obscured perception verbs, which emphasize difficulty in discrimination, are another set of condition-oriented perception verbs in Baltic and Russian and are closely related to specific verbs synchronically and diachronically.

    This paper describes non-specific, specific, and obscured perception verbs in the Baltic languages and attempts to capture their variability within six dimensions (morphology, area, diachrony, specificity, modality, obscured verbs). A precondition for this endeavor is a critique of earlier approaches to the semantics of perception verbs. Nine major biases are identified (nominalism, physiology, discrete features, vision, paradigmatic modelling, aspectual event types, dual nature models, participant orientation, and viewing activity as control). In developing an alternative, the approach greatly profits from Gibson’s ecological psychology and Rock’s theory of indirect perception. 

  • 630.
    Wälchli, Bernhard
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    The incomplete story of feminine gender loss in Northwestern Latvian dialects2017In: Baltic Linguistics, ISSN 2081-7533, Vol. 8, p. 143-214Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this paper is to show that Northwestern Latvian dialects (also called Tamian) are insufficiently characterized by placing them on a simple linear hierarchy of feminine gender loss, which is how they are traditionally approached in Latvian dialectology. While Lithuanian and Central and High Latvian dialects all have very similar and fairly canonical gender systems, various Northwestern Latvian dialects display a wealth of underexplored non-canonical gender properties, such as the reactivated topic marker gender relic, honorific feminine gender, pronominal adjectives behaving differently from attributive adjectives, the noun ‘boy’ turning into a hybrid feminine noun, and a third controller gender restricted to some diminutives. Feminine gender loss is traditionally explained by Livonian (Finnic) substrate. It is shown in this paper that the developments in NW Latvian have multiple causes, one of them being apocope (loss of short vowels infinal syllables), a common feature of NW Latvian dialects which prompted many developments making NW Latvian different from Central Latvian dialects and which is also ultimately due to language contact. Apocope and other developments made the system more complex. The non-canonical gender properties described in this paper are the effect of subsequent developments reducing system complexity again.

  • 631.
    Yamazaki, Yoko
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Baltic Languages, Finnish and German, Baltic Languages.
    Monosyllabic circumflexion or shortening?: The treatment of the long vowels in the 3rd person future forms in Lithuanian2014In: Indogermanische Forschungen, ISSN 0019-7262, E-ISSN 1613-0405, Vol. 119, no 1, p. 339-354Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Lithuanian 3rd person future forms of monosyllabic acute stems arementioned as one of the categories where the examples of a phenomenoncalled “monosyllabic circumflexion” or “monosyllabic metatony” are found,e.g., dúotiduõs ‘to give.’ However, there are several exceptions, e.g., lìs (lýti ‘to rain’), bùs ( būti ‘to be’), etc. Yet, the condition of the exceptionshas not been fully analyzed in the context of the verbal systeminvolving other tense paradigms. In this paper, a thorough examination willbe conducted on the 3rd person future forms and their paradigms in Lithuanian.It is found that the verbs which have shortened 3rd person future formsalways have the nasal infix present. Based on this result, a possible interpretationwill be presented as to how certain 3rd person future forms have beenshortened. Also, I will propose that the shortening of the 3rd person futureforms is a secondary development, whereas MC could be the regular processfor the 3rd person future forms.

  • 632.
    Zora, Hatice
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics.
    Riad, Tomas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Scandinavian Languages.
    Ylinen, Sari
    Prosodically controlled derivations in the mental lexicon2019In: Journal of Neurolinguistics, ISSN 0911-6044, E-ISSN 1873-8052, Vol. 52, article id 100856Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Swedish morphemes are classified as prosodically specified or prosodically unspecified, depending on lexical or phonological stress, respectively. Here, we investigate the allomorphy of the suffix -(i)sk, which indicates the distinction between lexical and phonological stress; if attached to a lexically stressed morpheme, it takes a non-syllabic form (-sk), whereas if attached to a phonologically stressed morpheme, an epenthetic vowel is inserted (-isk). Using mismatch negativity (MMN), we explored the neural processing of this allomorphy across lexically stressed and phonologically stressed morphemes. In an oddball paradigm, participants were occasionally presented with congruent and incongruent derivations, created by the suffix -(i)sk, within the repetitive presentation of their monomorphemic stems. The results indicated that the congruent derivation of the lexically stressed stem elicited a larger MMN than the incongruent sequences of the same stem and the derivational suffix, whereas after the phonologically stressed stem a non-significant tendency towards an opposite pattern was observed. We argue that the significant MMN response to the congruent derivation in the lexical stress condition is in line with lexical MMN, indicating a holistic processing of the sequence of lexically stressed stem and derivational suffix. The enhanced MMN response to the incongruent derivation in the phonological stress condition, on the other hand, is suggested to reflect combinatorial processing of the sequence of phonologically stressed stem and derivational suffix. These findings bring a new aspect to the dual-system approach to neural processing of morphologically complex words, namely the specification of word stress.

  • 633.
    Zora, Hatice
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics.
    Schwarz, Iris-Corinna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics.
    Heldner, Mattias
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics.
    Neural correlates of lexical stress: mismatch negativity reflects fundamental frequency and intensity2015In: NeuroReport, ISSN 0959-4965, E-ISSN 1473-558X, Vol. 26, no 13, p. 791-796Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Neural correlates of lexical stress were studied using the mismatch negativity (MMN) component in event-related potentials. The MMN responses were expected to reveal the encoding of stress information into long-term memory and the contributions of prosodic features such as fundamental frequency (F0) and intensity toward lexical access. In a passive oddball paradigm, neural responses to changes in F0, intensity, and in both features together were recorded for words and pseudowords. The findings showed significant differences not only between words and pseudowords but also between prosodic features. Early processing of prosodic information in words was indexed by an intensity-related MMN and an F0-related P200. These effects were stable at right-anterior and mid-anterior regions. At a later latency, MMN responses were recorded for both words and pseudowords at the mid-anterior and posterior regions. The P200 effect observed for F0 at the early latency for words developed into an MMN response. Intensity elicited smaller MMN for pseudowords than for words. Moreover, a larger brain area was recruited for the processing of words than for the processing of pseudowords. These findings suggest earlier and higher sensitivity to prosodic changes in words than in pseudowords, reflecting a language-related process. The present study, therefore, not only establishes neural correlates of lexical stress but also confirms the presence of long-term memory traces for prosodic information in the brain.

  • 634.
    Álvarez López, Laura
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Spanish, Portuguese and Latin American Studies, Portuguese.
    200 años de herencia lingüística afrolatina: descendientes de Ansina y otros soldados de Artigas en el Paraguay2013In: Moderna Språk, ISSN 2000-3560, E-ISSN 2000-3560, Vol. 107, no 1Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [es]

    Los datos lingüísticos analizados provienen en parte de comunidades afroparaguayas fundadas por los descendientes de esclavos libertos que fueron soldados de José Artigas, el "libertador y héroe nacional" del Uruguay. El objetivo del artículo es comparar los datos afroparaguayos analizados por Lipski (2009) con datos de variedades del español y portugués en contacto con lenguas africanas en Uruguay y Brasil para ver si coinciden o no. Con base en datos lingüísticos y socio-históricos, se argumenta que tal vez existan tantas o más similitudes con variedades de portugués afrobrasileño que con los datos sobre el habla de los afrouruguayos en los siglos XVIII y XIX. Esto puede explicarse a través de hechos históricos y sociales.

  • 635.
    Álvarez López, Laura
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Spanish, Portuguese and Latin American Studies.
    Como avançar no estudo do léxico de origem africana na América Latina?2012In: Revista da Abralin, ISSN 1678-1805, E-ISSN 2178-7603, Vol. 11, no 2, p. 203-225Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The text discusses adequate methodologies for the development of a database including lexicon of African origin in varieties of Latin American Spanish and Portuguese. The aim is to start a discussion about the elaboration of theoretical and methodological approaches to be applied in future research. It also points out the possibility of articulation of various work fronts operating at the same time for which it will become necessary to perform lexicographical and metalexicographical pilot studies alongside the development of the database. The idea is to test a set of hypotheses and elaborate theoretical and methodological approaches that result suitable for a systematic and comprehensive study of the lexicon of African origin in Latin America using the available sources.

  • 636.
    Álvarez López, Laura
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Spanish, Portuguese and Latin American Studies.
    SARAVÁ ZIFIU! A integração do prefixo ‘ZI’ em Afro-variedades do português2013In: Cadernos de Estudos Linguísticos, ISSN 0102-5767, Vol. 55, no 2, p. 7-23Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Within the research on the participation of Africans and their descendants in the formation of Brazilian Portuguese, the aim of this paper is to analyze occurrences of the prefix z/zi , as well as its variant ji , in oral and written representations of speech of Africans and their descendants in Brazil as well as in Africa. The main issues are: a) what is the origin of this particle and how was it integrated into varieties of Brazilian and African Portuguese? It is argued that the particle zi  is a remnant of a Bantu noun class prefix which has lost its grammatical function

  • 637.
    Álvarez López, Laura
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Romance Studies and Classics.
    The dialect of São João da Chapada: possible remains of a mining language in Minas Gerais, Brazil2019In: International Journal of the Sociology of Language, ISSN 0165-2516, E-ISSN 1613-3668, no 258, p. 143-170Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper focuses on the analysis of a specific vocabulary, possibly the remains of a mining language spoken by descendants of Africans. It analyzes 149 lexical items that were registered in the 1920s in a rural region of Minas Gerais, near the city of Diamantina. Based on earlier historical and linguistic studies, as well as on dictionaries of relevant African languages, the lexical study aims to analyze 149 words and expressions in order to verify the etymologies, and determine whether they fit the demographic data available on the origins of the slave population in this area. The second aim is to analyze the distribution of the lexical items in different semantic domains and word classes and compare the observed tendencies, as well as other linguistic characteristics and social functions, with other mining languages and/or similar Afro-Brazilian and Afro-European varieties. The results indicate that Umbundu maintained a high status in the area, and that this variety was not limited to mining activities, but was probably used in everyday life as a secret code that was part of the strategies of resistance among slaves.

  • 638.
    Álvarez López, Laura
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Spanish, Portuguese and Latin American Studies.
    Bertolotti, Virginia
    Usos americanos de su merced en el siglo XIX2013In: Lexis, ISSN 0254-9239, Vol. 37, no 1, p. 5-32Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper is an empirical study of the presence of the address form su merced in the XIX century, particularly in Latin American literary texts representing the speech of Africans and their descendants, based on examples taken from Lipski (2005a, 2005b) and texts included in CORDE. Based on data found in other corpora, the discussion also includes uses of su merced in official written communication. It reviews earlier studies about su merced in Latin America and concludes that this address form appears in the context of asymmetrical social relations between groups and especially in the speech of Africans and their descendants.

  • 639.
    Álvarez López, Laura
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Romance Studies and Classics.
    Jon-And, Anna
    Dalarna University, Sweden.
    Afro-Brazilian Cupópia: lexical and morphosyntactic features of a lexically driven in-group code2017In: Journal of Pidgin and Creole languages ( Print), ISSN 0920-9034, E-ISSN 1569-9870, Vol. 32, no 1, p. 75-103Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The present paper focuses on the speech of a rural Afro-Brazilian community called Cafundó, situated 150 km from São Paulo. In 1978, when linguistic data were collected, the community constituted approximately eighty individuals, descendants of two slave women who inherited their owners’ proprieties. According to earlier studies, when the inhabitants of Cafundó spoke in their supposed ‘African language,’ Cupópia, they used structures borrowed from Portuguese and a vocabulary of possible African origin. A lexical analysis shows that the etymologies match historical and demographical data, indicating that speakers of varieties of Kimbundu, Kikongo and Umbundu dominated in the community. Through a morphosyntactic analysis, specific features were found in the data, such as copula absence and variable agreement patterns. By showing that some of Cupópia’s specific grammatical features are not derived from the Portuguese spoken by the same speakers but are instead shared with more restructured varieties, this paper defends the hypothesis that this lexically driven in-group code is not simply a regional variety of Portuguese with a number of African-derived words.

  • 640.
    Ädel, Annelie
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    "Just to give you kind of a map of where we are going": a taxonomy of metadiscourse in spoken and written academic English2010In: Nordic Journal of English Studies, ISSN 1654-6970, E-ISSN 1654-6970, Vol. 9, no 2Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

     

    One of the basic functions to which language is put is to comment on discourse or on language itself. Reflexivity in language occurs in everyday discourse as well as in specialised discourse, such as academic papers or lectures. It is often referred to as metadiscourse, or „discourse about discourse‟, as in In this paper, I explore… or just to give you kind of a map of where we are going… Such expressions are very common in academic genres, where the writer/speaker is expected to guide the audience through the discourse, for example by making its structure explicit. While research into metadiscourse has focused on academic writing, academic speech has remained largely unexplored. Furthermore, comparisons of spoken and written metadiscourse are rare, so the similarities and differences between spoken and written types of metadiscourse are unknown.

    The present qualitative and corpus-based study compares the use of personal metadiscourse in 30 spoken university lectures to that of 130 highly proficient essays by graduate students. The purpose is to present an empirically based taxonomy of the discourse functions of spoken and written metadiscourse with respect to academic English. Despite claims in previous research that separate treatment is needed, a lumping approach is taken rather than a splitting one. The goal is to create one taxonomy for both modes, thereby highlighting both similarities and differences in the distribution of discourse functions across speech and writing.

    The proposed taxonomy consists of 23 discourse functions, divided into four main categories:

    Metalinguistic comments, Discourse organisation, Speech act labels and References to the audience. The findings reveal that most of the discourse functions in the taxonomy occurred in both speech and writing, although spoken metadiscourse performed a greater range of discourse actions than written metadiscourse. Differences in the conditions of speech and writing did indeed cause variation in the use of metadiscourse: The discourse functions REPAIRING, MARKING ASIDES and CONTEXTUALISING occurred only in the spoken data because of the lack of time for planning and revision in real-time discourse, while MANAGING COMPREHENSION/CHANNEL and MANAGING AUDIENCE DISCIPLINE occurred only in the spoken data because of the direct presence of an audience. Factors related to genre were also found to cause variation in the use of metadiscourse: ARGUING was considerably more common in the written data, since academic writers typically need to put a great deal of work into argumentation, while lecturers generally present information not based on their own research. MANAGING THE MESSAGE, on the other hand, was common in the spoken data, which can be attributed to lecturers adopting a more authoritative role than student writers.

     
  • 641.
    Ädel, Annelie
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Rapport building in student group work2011In: Journal of Pragmatics, ISSN 0378-2166, E-ISSN 1879-1387, Vol. 43, no 12, p. 2932-2947Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    How do students build rapport in online group work, especially if all they have to work with is asynchronous text? Taking this question as a point of departure, this paper presents research into the ‘interactional’ function in group work among university students, specifically investigating rapport-building language use, defined as communicative acts promoting social concord. Rapport building is examined in online student group work, using written material in the form of discussion board messages (from the Mid-Sweden Corpus of Computer-Assisted Language Learning). To help bring out what is characteristic of the online type of discourse, spoken face-to-face material also representing student– student interaction (from the Michigan Corpus of Academic Spoken English) is included. Frequency word lists based on the two sets of material were used in combination with concordancing in order to find which of the most frequent expressions functioned as rapport building, thus combining corpus-based and discourse-analytical methods. A taxonomy of rapport-building discourse functions was developed, containing four major categories: discourse-structuring, intratextual, face-saving and bonding units. Each of these covers specific discourse functions; in the case of bonding units, these are Agreeing; Aligning with in-group; Commiserating; Complimenting; Seeking agreement; Offering encouragement; Thanking; Responding to thanks; and Chatting.

  • 642.
    Ädel, Annelie
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    "What uh the folks who did this survey found": expert attribution in spoken academic lectures2008In: Nordic Journal of English Studies, ISSN 1654-6970, E-ISSN 1654-6970, Vol. 7, no 3, p. 83-102Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Academic writing has been said to display a tension between originality and humility to the community (Myers 1990; Berkenkotter & Huckin 1995; Hyland 1999). One of the fundamental ways in which this tension plays out is in references to previous research, or ‘attribution’. While recent research has emphasized the importance of attribution in academic writing—Hyland (1999), for example, found the average number of citations in research articles to be as high as 70 per 10,000 words—the role of attribution in spoken academic discourse is relatively uncharted territory. In this study of attribution in academic speech, transcripts of 30 large lectures from the Michigan Corpus of Academic Spoken English (MICASE; Simpson et al. 1999) were analysed, totalling 250,000 words. References to expert sources in the academic domain were analysed, specifically third person attribution (including third person pronouns, proper names, and a selection of nouns), as in “um and, Marx points out that those are the tools that the proletariat are gonna use”. The research questions were: To what degree dolecturers situate intertextually the knowledge and facts they are presenting? Do thedisciplinary differences found in written citation practices also occur in speech? Howvariable are the formal realizations of attribution in speech?Contrary to previous research findings (e.g. Biber 2006; Swales 2005), the studyshowed both that expert attribution is quite pervasive and that there is disciplinaryvariation in academic speech. The findings are compared to studies of attribution inacademic writing (e.g. Hyland 1999; Tadros 1993), with the goal of contributing tocurrent research on the commonalities that academic speech (lectures) exhibits withacademic writing on one hand, and non-academic speech on the other.

  • 643.
    Ädel, Annelie
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Mauranen, Anna
    English Department, University of Helsinki, Finland.
    Metadiscourse: diverse and divided perspectives 2010In: Nordic Journal of English Studies, ISSN 1654-6970, E-ISSN 1654-6970, Vol. 9, no 2, p. 1-11Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 644. Åsman, Thea Palm
    et al.
    Pedersen, Jan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    How Bert got into Ned's head: domestication in the translation of literature for young readers2013In: Perspectives: studies in translatology, ISSN 0907-676X, E-ISSN 1747-6623, Vol. 21, no 2, p. 143-155Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this paper was to discover to what extent the American translation of the Swedish children's novel Berts dagbok had been adapted to its audience as a result of the translator's initial norm. Previous research has found that while translators of children's literature traditionally mainly employ domesticating strategies, recent research has shown that current translations of canonized children's literature, and literature aimed at a slightly older demographic segment, have been more source-oriented. We therefore decided to investigate whether the translator's initial norm had been to domesticate the text, i.e. adapting any unfamiliar cultural context with regard to the new audience, American children and young teenagers. Through the analysis of coupled pairs it was concluded that the translator's initial norm was still to domesticate the text, and, as a result, a majority of the extracted examples had been replaced by something more familiar to the new audience, which consequently moved the story from Sweden to USA.

  • 645.
    Östberg, Urban
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Scandinavian Languages.
    De indoeuropeiska språkens historia2008In: Språkbruk, ISSN 0358-9293, no 4Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 646.
    Östberg, Urban
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Scandinavian Languages.
    Ett träd med vida grenar2009In: Historielärarnas förenings årsskrift, ISSN 0439-2434, p. 151-153Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 647.
    Östberg, urban
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Scandinavian Languages.
    Seglivade språkmyter2009In: Språkbruk, ISSN 0358-9293, no 1, p. 29-30Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 648.
    Östberg, Urban
    Stockholm University. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Scandinavian Languages.
    Snön faller rikligt i svenska språket2009In: Svenskläraren, ISSN 0346-2412, no 2, p. 33-34Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 649.
    Östberg, Urban
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Scandinavian Languages.
    Språkets rot sökes genom grenars studier2008In: Svenskläraren, ISSN 0346-2412, no 3Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 650.
    Östling, Robert
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Computational Linguistics.
    Börstell, Carl
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics. Radboud University, Netherlands.
    Courtaux, Servane
    Visual Iconicity Across Sign Languages: Large-Scale Automated Video Analysis of Iconic Articulators and Locations2018In: Frontiers in Psychology, ISSN 1664-1078, E-ISSN 1664-1078, Vol. 9, article id 725Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We use automatic processing of 120,000 sign videos in 31 different sign languages to show a cross-linguistic pattern for two types of iconic form–meaning relationships in the visual modality. First, we demonstrate that the degree of inherent plurality of concepts, based on individual ratings by non-signers, strongly correlates with the number of hands used in the sign forms encoding the same concepts across sign languages. Second, we show that certain concepts are iconically articulated around specific parts of the body, as predicted by the associational intuitions by non-signers. The implications of our results are both theoretical and methodological. With regard to theoretical implications, we corroborate previous research by demonstrating and quantifying, using a much larger material than previously available, the iconic nature of languages in the visual modality. As for the methodological implications, we show how automatic methods are, in fact, useful for performing large-scale analysis of sign language data, to a high level of accuracy, as indicated by our manual error analysis.

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