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  • 651.
    Whiteley, Giles
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    ‘Neither for God, Nor for His Enemies’: Wilde’s ‘Theoretikos’ and Pater’s Essay on Botticelli2017In: Notes and Queries, ISSN 0029-3970, E-ISSN 1471-6941, Vol. 64, no 4, p. 624-626Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 652.
    Whiteley, Giles
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Oscar Wilde and The Picture of Dorian Gray2021In: The Palgrave Handbook of Steam Age Gothic / [ed] Clive Bloom, Palgrave Macmillan, 2021, p. 791-805Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This chapter focuses on Oscar Wilde’s contributions to nineteenth-century gothic literature. It reads his work historically as an engagement with the modernity of late Victorian life, and contextualizes themes that Wilde investigates alongside contemporary interest in ideas such as chiromancy, mesmerism and spiritualism, as well as phrenology and sexology. The chapter begins by examining Wilde’s humorous gothic short stories, ‘The Canterville Ghost’ and ‘Lord Arthur Savile’s Crime’, before reading in detail his novel, The Picture of Dorian Gray, as a work of decadent Gothic. The chapter concludes by briefly considering some of Wilde’s later gothic pieces, such as the play Salomé.

  • 653.
    Whiteley, Giles
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Oscar Wilde and the Simulacrum: the Truth of Masks2015Book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Oscar Wilde is more than a name, more than an author. From precocious Oxford undergraduate to cause célèbre of the West End of the 1890s, to infamous criminal, the proper name Wilde has become an event in the history of literature and culture. Taking Wilde seriously as a philosopher in his own right, Whiteley’s groundbreaking book places his texts into their philosophical context in order to show how Wilde broke from his peers, and in particular from idealism, and challenges recent neo-historicist readings of Wilde which seem content to limit his irruptive power. Using the paradoxical concept of the simulacrum to resituate Wilde’s work in relation to both his precursors and his contemporaries, Whiteley’s study reads Wilde through Deleuze and postmodern philosophical commentary on the simulacrum. In a series of striking juxtapositions, Whiteley challenges us to rethink both Oscar Wilde’s aesthetics and his philosophy, to take seriously both the man and the mask. His philosophy of masks is revealed to figure a truth of a different kind — the simulacra through which Wilde begins to develop and formulate a mature philosophy that constitutes an ethics of joy.

  • 654.
    Whiteley, Giles
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Pater and Schelling2021In: Studies in Walter Pater and aestheticism, ISSN 2445-5962, no 6Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 655.
    Whiteley, Giles
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Peter Collister (ed.), The American Scene by Henry James2021In: Notes and Queries, ISSN 0029-3970, E-ISSN 1471-6941, Vol. 68, no 1, p. 147-148Article, book review (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Considering what he calls ‘The Scale of the Infusion’, one of the running-heads to the British edition of The American Scene (1907), Henry James professes himself at something of a loss. Faced by the overwhelming ‘impression’ of New York, James finds the spectacle resistant to attempts to make it ‘legible’, to find meaning from the vision of excess which lay profligate all around him. The travelogue recalls James’ journey to America in 1904–05, his first trip back to his homeland in over twenty years. Having made his name and career in Europe, James was fresh from the recent completion of the novels of his so-called ‘major phase’, The Wings of the Dove (1902), The Ambassadors (1903) and The Golden Bowl (1904). But if the trip was a return of the native (James was disappointed that Thomas Hardy had already taken this title (3 n.2)), the person who returned was not the one who had left to seek his literary fortune. As such, The American Scene is a document of James’ sense of ‘dispossession’ (100), of a subject unable to fix his sense of the past or comprehend the new America he encountered.

  • 656.
    Whiteley, Giles
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Ruskin and London2018In: The Palgrave Encyclopedia of Urban Literary Studies / [ed] Jeremy Tambling, Palgrave Macmillan, 2018Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    John Ruskin lived and worked for most of his life in London. While he is primarily remembered for the importance of his theoretical contributions to nineteenth-century urban literary studies in The Stones of Venice, his reading of Venice must be understood as related to his treatment of London. This entry contextualizes Ruskin’s life in the British capital city, before following his response to London from his initial Romanticism through to his later works, which constitute a virulent attack on the social ills of the modern metropolis. The entry concludes by considering the wider significance of Ruskin’s London within the context of modernist urban literary studies.

  • 657.
    Whiteley, Giles
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Ruskin and Venice2020In: The Palgrave Encyclopedia of Urban Literary Studies / [ed] Jeremy Tambling, Palgrave Macmillan, 2020Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 658.
    Whiteley, Giles
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Schelling’s Reception in Nineteenth-Century British Literature2018Book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This book examines the various ways in which the German philosopher Friedrich Schelling was read and responded to by British readers and writers during the nineteenth century. Challenging the idea that Schelling’s reception was limited to the Romantics, this book shows the ways in which his thought continued to be engaged with across the whole period. It follows Schelling’s reception both chronologically and conceptually as it developed in a number of different disciplines in British aesthetics, literature, philosophy, science and theology. What emerges is a vibrant new history of the period, showing the important role played by reading and responding to Schelling, either directly or more diffusely, and taking in a vast array of major thinkers during the period. This book, which will be of interest not only to historians of philosophy and the history of ideas, but to all those dealing with Anglo-German reception during the nineteenth century, reveals Schelling to be a kind of uncanny presence underwriting British thought.

  • 659.
    Whiteley, Giles
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Shakespeare, Influence and Appropriation2022In: The Palgrave Handbook of Gothic Origins / [ed] Clive Bloom, Cham: Palgrave Macmillan, 2022, p. 23-50Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Surveying recent interest in the various intersections of Shakespeare and the gothic, this chapter considers three aspects of these points of convergence. It considers the role played by Shakespeare in the early gothic of writers such as Walpole and Radcliffe, and in the course of this discussion, also considers Shakespeare’s role in mid-eighteenth-century nationalist political debates, in which the idea of a ‘gothic’ heritage developed at around the same time as Bardology: Shakespeare was appropriated as a ‘gothic’ writer anachronistically by Whig historians. The chapter then gives attention to the topic and imagery in Shakespeare’s theatre which came to fascinate later writers of the gothic, including his representation of the supernatural and ‘unnatural’, dreams, ghosts and madness. The chapter briefly concludes by considering some of the ways in which Shakespeare would be appropriated by later writers of the gothic tradition in the nineteenth century and beyond.

  • 660.
    Whiteley, Giles
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Shakespeare’s Dark Ecologies: Rethinking the Environment in Macbeth and King Lear2019In: Shakespeare's Things: Shakespearean Theatre and the Non-Human World in History, Theory, and Performance / [ed] Brett Gamboa, Lawrence Switzky, London: Routledge, 2019, p. 134-149Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 661.
    Whiteley, Giles
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Some Unnoted Sources in Oscar Wilde’s Commonplace Book2017In: Notes and Queries, ISSN 0029-3970, E-ISSN 1471-6941, Vol. 64, no 4, p. 628-634Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 662.
    Whiteley, Giles
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Some Unnoted Sources in Oscar Wilde’s Oxford Notebook2017In: Notes and Queries, ISSN 0029-3970, E-ISSN 1471-6941, Vol. 64, no 4, p. 626-628Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 663.
    Whiteley, Giles
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Spectres of Antiquity: Classical Literature and the Gothic, 1740–1830 by James Uden2021In: Eighteenth-century studies, ISSN 0013-2586, E-ISSN 1086-315X, Vol. 55, no 1, p. 130-132Article, book review (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Good scholarly books sometimes seek not only to add to what we know about any given subject, but also to radically reconfigure the supposed knowns of this subject. James Uden's Spectres of Antiquity is one such book. Founded on what initially seems like a counter-intuitive inspiration, Uden asks us to re-conceive our understanding of the origins of the Gothic as less a reaction to, than a reconfiguration of, the classical heritage. In the mode of all good Gothicists, Uden unearths the repressed kernel at the core of his subject, but in this case it is the surprising revelation that the Gothic does not seek to exorcise the "spectres" of the classics and the classical past, but rather mines and relies upon a subterranean vault of classical sources, creatively reworking them. The results of Uden's labors are striking, and it is not hyperbole to say that Spectres of Antiquity will be essential reading to all who are interested in the origins of the Gothic or to the history of classical reception in the eighteen and early nineteenth centuries.

  • 664.
    Whiteley, Giles
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    ‘Tenebrific Constellations’: Carlyle, Addison and Burns2018In: Notes and Queries, ISSN 0029-3970, E-ISSN 1471-6941, Vol. 65, no 3, p. 368-372Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 665.
    Whiteley, Giles
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    The Count Marsigli and De Quincey’s ‘The Dark Interpreter’2018In: Notes and Queries, ISSN 0029-3970, E-ISSN 1471-6941, Vol. 65, no 3, p. 378-381Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 666.
    Whiteley, Giles
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    The Crowing Cocks in Wilde’s ‘The Ballad of Reading Gaol’2020In: Notes and Queries, ISSN 0029-3970, E-ISSN 1471-6941, Vol. 67, no 1, p. 127-131Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 667.
    Whiteley, Giles
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    The Earliest Literary Reference to Manchester Pudding?2017In: Notes and Queries, ISSN 0029-3970, E-ISSN 1471-6941, Vol. 64, no 4, p. 613-614Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 668.
    Whiteley, Giles
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    The origin of the words ‘tenebrific’ and ‘tenebrificous’2018In: Notes and Queries, ISSN 0029-3970, E-ISSN 1471-6941, Vol. 65, no 3, p. 310-314Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 669.
    Whiteley, Giles
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    The Origins of ‘Hedonism’: A German Context and an Antedating2021In: Notes and Queries, ISSN 0029-3970, E-ISSN 1471-6941, Vol. 68, no 3, p. 309-311Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 670.
    Whiteley, Giles
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    The ‘Thaumaturgic Art of Thought’: Bram Stoker and Thomas Carlyle2017In: Notes and Queries, ISSN 0029-3970, E-ISSN 1471-6941, Vol. 64, no 4, p. 622-623Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 671.
    Whiteley, Giles
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    The Tree of Knowledge: New Insights on Katherine Mansfield, Oscar Wilde and ‘A Woman’2017In: Katherine Mansfield and Russia / [ed] Galya Diment, Gerri Kimber, W Todd Martin, Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press, 2017, p. 175-189Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This chapter examines in detail a number of unattributed quotations taken from the journals of 1907, signed ‘O.W.’, ‘A Woman’ and ‘A.W.’. I call into question the critical heritage on these signatures, which has taken them to refer to Oscar Wilde and to Mansfield herself, an error traced to the early work of John Middleton Murry. This article instead establishes Mansfield’s hitherto unknown source as the novel The Tree of Knowledge, by an anonymous author, and offers a close reading of the Mansfield’s use of the novel in these pages. The article concludes by speculating as to the author, and as to how Mansfield came to read the text.

  • 672.
    Whiteley, Giles
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Thomas Carlyle, Dyspepsia, and Late Romantic Irony2019Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Born in 1898 and dying in 1881, Carlyle came to prominence during the late Romantic period, a forceful Anglophone populariser of German Romanticism, before taking up a proverbial seat as the Sage of Victorian Britain. For Nietzsche, writing in 1888, Carlyle’s ‘dyspepsia’ (a condition which he suffered from, though here also a metaphor) was a symptom of his ‘constant passionate dishonesty against himself’, but that was the later Carlyle; as a younger man, he was clearly aware of his ‘anachronism’, insofar as his relevance lied precisely in his ‘lateness’. In his philosophical novel Sartor Resartus, begun in 1831, at the moment of late Romanticism, and published in 1833-34, following a Scottish editor’s attempts to introduce the British reading public to the German Teufelsdröckh’s philosophy of clothes, Carlyle meditates on his own lateness. The novel is often read as a satire of German thought, but this misses the subtlety of Carlyle’s approach; instead, Sartor Resartus is best approached through Schlegel’s idea of Romantic irony, as Haney argued (1978). This irony marks the distance between the ideal it seeks to represent and the necessary failure of its execution, and this paper will take up Haney’s point, informed by de Man (1977), considering the sense in which Romantic irony not only underwrites Carlyle’s own struggles with adopting Romanticism late, but the ways in which he sees that an ironic ‘transcendental buffoonery’ is inscribed in the very structure of Romanticism itself. In so doing, it offers another way to approach Carlyle’s ‘dyspepsia’, with Romantic irony figuring neither a personal quality nor that of the isolated ironist, but one of a ‘typical Romantic’, to rework Nietzsche. Sartor Resartus becomes a late meditation precisely on the lateness of Romanticism more broadly conceived, its irony marking the distance of Romanticism’s own ‘constant passionate dishonesty’ against itself.

  • 673.
    Whiteley, Giles
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Three French Modernists2020In: The Palgrave Handbook of Contemporary Gothic / [ed] Clive Bloom, Palgrave Macmillan, 2020, p. 1093-1108Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This chapter focuses on the Gothic of three French modernist writers, Georges Bataille, Pierre Klossowski and Maurice Blanchot. It begins by contextualising Bataille’s philosophy alongside Sigmund Freud’s psychoanalysis, arguing that Bataille’s work proved a major theoretical resource for twentieth-century gothic traditions. Focusing in particular on Bataille’s ideas of eroticism, excess and transgression, and his critical work on gothic fiction and figures including the Marquis de Sade and Gilles de Rais, the chapter then considers Bataille’s own contributions to gothic fiction. Focus then turns to the ways in which Bataille’s Gothic influenced two of his friends and most significant heirs in French modernism, Klossowski and Blanchot. In all three, the Gothic is written and theorised in relation to the traumatic events which ravaged France during the period of the First and Second World Wars.

  • 674.
    Whiteley, Giles
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Tigers, Criminals, Rogues: Animality in Dickens’ Detective Fiction2022In: Animals in Detective Fiction / [ed] Ruth Hawthorn; John Miller, Cham: Palgrave Macmillan, 2022, p. 27-45Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This essay addresses Dickens’ use of animals in his detective fiction. For Dickens, the detective is the one who can read the signs of the animal which the criminal attempts to dissimulate. In Bleak House and The Mystery of Edwin Drood, Dickens plays on Victorian stereotypes in portraying criminals as tigers. However, Dickens’ use of animals is not simply reductive. In both novels, he recognises the uncanny link that binds tiger to tiger-hunter, a point contextualised alongside recent developments in evolutionary theory. The essay concludes by analysing Dickens’ use of birds, showing how he deploys animals in his detective fiction to deconstruct the perceived boundaries between those who represent the law and those who transgress it.

  • 675.
    Whiteley, Giles
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    True and False Epicureanisms: Contextualizing Pater’s Marius the Epicurean 2019Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Walter Pater famously conceived of his 1885 historical novel Marius the Epicurean as an opportunity to recontextualise the ideas he had broached in his infamous conclusion to his earlier Renaissance (1873). In his novel, he sought to highlight an ethical distinction he hoped to establish between a ‘true’ Epicureanism (a rounded aestheticism) and a degenerate decadence. It was this nuanced and renewed idea, drawn from a classical heritage and repurposed for a Victorian audience, that underwrote Pater’s attack on the ‘unsuccessful experiment[s] in Epicureanism’ represented by the protagonist in his review of Wilde’s Dorian Gray. But while scholars have identified some of Pater’s sources for his discussion of Epicureanism in his novel, showing how he engaged with classical scholarship, the ways in which he intervened into an existing nineteenth century discourse of the reception of Epicurus’ philosophy has not been widely studied. This paper will attempt to offer a preliminary mapping of the ways in which Pater’s Marius represents a form of Epicureanism both based on classical models and sensitive to the, often openly polemic, Victorian reception of Epicurus. It will discuss the ways in which Pater’s Epicureanism replies to the moral aesthetic theory of John Ruskin, and the ethical philosophical approach exemplified by William Wallace, a key figure in British Idealism. The paper shows the ways in which Pater’s renewal of his own aestheticism in the novel itself offered a chance at a renewed engagement with his peers.

  • 676.
    Whiteley, Giles
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Wilde and Fin de Siècle London2021In: The Palgrave Encyclopedia of Urban Literary Studies / [ed] Jeremy Tambling, Palgrave Macmillan, 2021Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Oscar Wilde’s (1854–1900) strange spatial dislocation is summed up succinctly by a 1891 letter to the French writer, Edmond de Goncourt (1822–1896): “Français de sympathie, je suis Irlandais de race, et les Anglais m’ont condamné à parler le langage de Shakespeare” [French by sympathy, I am Irish by birth, and by the English I am condemned to speak the language of Shakespeare] (Wilde 2000a: 505) (This entry relies and expands upon research first published in Giles Whiteley, The Aesthetics of Space in Nineteenth-Century Literature, 1843–1907 (Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press, 2020). I thank Edinburgh University Press for permission to reuse material here.). Born in Dublin, Wilde would die living in Paris, following his self-imposed exile in the wake of his infamous 1895 trial and incarceration for acts of “gross indecency.” Both cities were formative influences on Wilde, who would go on to become the leading spokesman for aestheticism and decadence in English....

  • 677.
    Wigzell, Klara
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    The Price of Assessment: Ender’s Game as an Educational Tool in the EFL Classroom2022Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    As Sweden has moved towards an assessment-driven education system, an increase in studies reporting the decline of students’ well-being has also followed. The studies indicate a strong correlation between said decline and the potential negative effects of assessment such as stress and emotional distress. Defining well-being as a balance between the students’ abilities and their aims, this essay investigates how and why Ender’s Game by Orson Scott Card (1991) can be used as a tool for identifying the possible impact of assessment on this   balance while simultaneously working towards both abstract and concrete goals of current curricula and the Education Act. Foucauldian theory is utilized as a way of identifying and dismantling structures of assessment with key factors such as surveillance, testing and categorization constituting the main foci in the analysis of Ender’s Game. The extremes of assessment at Card’s Battle School provide an excellent opportunity for students to gain awareness of their own situation at a safe distance while identifying potential similarities in the Swedish Education System and their effects on well-being.

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    Wigzell_K_The Price of Assessment: Ender's Game as an Educational Tool in the EFL Classroom
  • 678.
    Wikén Bonde, Ingrid
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Baltic Languages, Finnish and German, Dutch.
    Het Zweedse avontuur van Maarten 't Hart2009In: De Gids, ISSN 0016-9730, no 7, p. 845-852Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 679.
    Winkler, Andreas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Classical Archaeology and Ancient History.
    LIPPERT, S. und STADLER, M.A. (Hrsg.) - Gehilfe des Thot. Festschrift für Karl-Theodor Zauzich zu seinem 75. Geburtstag. Verlag Otto Harrassowitz, Wiesbaden, 20142016In: Bibliotheca Orientalis, ISSN 0006-1913, E-ISSN 1875-659X, Vol. 73, no 3-4, p. 385-391Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 680.
    Wittenberg, John
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Culture and Aesthetics.
    ”Man kan aldrig ha för mycket ögonskugga”: En diskursanalys av identitet, skevhet och respektabilitet i Tove Folkessons Kalmars jägarinnor2017Independent thesis Advanced level (professional degree), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [sv]

    Detta examensarbete är en studie av Tove Folkessons romandebut Kalmars jägarinnor, där diskursanalys utgör både teori och metod. Studien kan placeras i relation till forskning om respektabilitet och skeva flickskap i litteraturen, men kan även ses som ett bidrag till det ämnesdidaktiska forskningsfältet med kopplingar till svenskämnet och normkritisk pedagogik. I undersökningen analyseras konstruktionen av den kollektiva identiteten som Kalmars jägarinnor – KJ. Analysen fokuserar även på splittringar i betydelsebildningen och på relationen mellan KJ:s kollektiva vi och det diskursiva Andra. Undersökningen visar att den kollektiva identiteten konstrueras kring betydelser som samhörighet, transparens, oberoende och gränsöverskridande handlingar. Detta kan ses som en konstruktion av ett skevt flickskap där KJ positionerar sig utanför en normativ linje i en icke-respektabel position, som dock har en positiv funktion för samhörigheten. Positioneringen innefattar en diskursiv kamp kring vilka kulturella kapital, kroppar, femininiteter och heterosexuella positioner som ska betraktas som legitima. Undersökningen visar också att splittringar i den kollektiva identiteten kan härledas till olikheter i medlemmarnas personligheter och identifikationer med alternativa subjektspositioner. KJ:s kollektiva vi konstrueras i tydlig opposition till det diskursiva Andra som framför allt representeras av den priviligierade positionen som ”handbollstjej”.

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    fulltext
  • 681.
    Woods, Joanna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Mohale Mashigo’s Intruders: The Cultivation of ‘A Place In-Between2021In: 'Story for healing': Mashigo's creative philosophy / [ed] Monica Latham; Clair McKeown; Marilyne Brun, France: Presses Universitaires de France, 2021, p. 220-233Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Focusing on three short stories from Mohale Mashigo’s critically acclaimed short story collection, Intruders (2018), this chapter explores how contemporary African speculative fiction writers are creating a dynamic space for imagination in their works. In my close reading of  “The High Heel Killer”, “Once Upon a Town” and “Nthatisi”, I adopt the term “limbotopia” in order to speak of a space between utopia and dystopia, and to illuminate the ways in which Mashigo grapples with the mundane and the fantastic in order to write black futures into the present. The nuanced projection of a third kind of space between utopia and dystopia complicates a more traditional, dichotomous conceptualisation of forms of non-mimetic fiction. It might also help to productively complicate the understanding of what constitutes South African post-millennial literature. By taking the imagination seriously, Mohale Mashigo highlights that the impossible is possible through creative works of fiction. I suggest that by identifying “limbotopia” as a more appropriate term for describing Mashigo’s speculative short stories, we might come to realise the manifestation of speculative fiction as a potential space of freedom in (South) Africa’s literary landscape. 

  • 682.
    Wrethed, Joakim
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Gothic Hauntology: Everyday Hauntings and Epistemological Desire2023Book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The study pursues the phenomenon of hauntology within the gothic genre. Hauntings in various forms constitute one of the defning features of the gothic category of fction from the very Walpolian beginning. Here, hauntology is mainly defined in accordance with Derrida’s central concepts of limitrophy, temporality and the presence of the past in the present. Hauntology is sought on a primordial level of experience in the characters of the narratives. Therefore, hauntology is generally seen as an inevitable affective and experiential phenomenon that highlights a fundamental human predicament. Fiction is an eminent tool for scrutinising such phenomena, which the selection of heterogenous works here emphatically demonstrates. The investigation moves from contemporary works by Atwood, Munro and Ajvide Lindqvist back to older canonised gothic fiction by Polidori, Poe, James and Lovecraft. Hauntology is shown to be a central force in these works in similar but also slightly different ways. By utilising the phenomenological concept of epistemological desire, which is set apart from the desire of needs, the analysis seeks to explicate the human striving for knowledge as a Sisyphus project and as an impossible desire for desire itself. By zooming in on details of experience, parts of the study move within the everyday spheres of the gothic and hauntology. In that way, the gothic and hauntology merge as a realistic force in any life lived and the paradox of absolute indeterminacy seems to constitute the only reasonable way of understanding life as an experiential movement. The gothic has always filled the function of reminding us of our vulnerability and to beware of rational and scientifc hubris. This study confirms that this is also the case in contemporary fiction.

  • 683.
    Wrethed, Joakim
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Matter, Screens, Buffering, Veils, Text and Texture in Tom McCarthy’s Satin Island2019Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In McCarthy’s novel the reader witnesses a media philosophical discourse dressed in the robes of a fictional narrative. Holistically viewed, it investigates the materiality of information and the sign systems of materiality. The materiality of veils merge with the veils of (dis)information. In addition to the well known trope of postmodern epistemological failure, Satin Island displays a full-fledged reality in which flows of matter resemble flows of information and vice versa. Anthropological historization of human culture—through textual documentation and extensive collections of artefacts—merges with the present flows of information. In certain respects the novel suggests that what we have come to know as “world” is actually a flow of matter-information. It is both an intricately coded message—or bluntly put, a thought—and an autonomous ontic bulk of materiality. In a subtle way, the narrative responds to the posthuman lack that inevitably seems to call into being a transcendental dimension (which in the orthodox secular-liberal ontology has become a despised anathema). The novel form seems—in the Bakhtinian sense—to be a very suitable medium for this kind of aesthetic cognition. As formulated by Hubert Zapf, certain literatures “suggest that phenomena and processes of matter, the biosphere, the body, and intense emotional states in their relation to processes of human culture are used as particularly frequent sources of literary creativity. Biosemiotic images from natural evolution are mapped onto and blended with images of a modern economic and technocentric culture” (65). Essentially, Satin Island is such a work.

  • 684.
    Wrethed, Joakim
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    No immanence for old men: the art of acting in John Banville's Eclipse and Philip Roth's The Humbling2012In: NIS: Nordic Irish Studies, ISSN 1602-124X, E-ISSN 2002-4517, Vol. 11, no 1, p. 121-131Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 685.
    Wretman Lundgren, Mikaela
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Century-Travelling, Gender-Bending Artists:: A Comparison of the Artists in Woolf's Orlando and Smith's How to Be Both2016Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This essay primarily looks at the relationship between gender and art through history,

    by comparing the two main characters of Virginia Woolf's Orlando (1928) and Ali

    Smith's How to Be Both (2014), and their shared qualities of being gender-bending,

    century-travelling artists. The theoretical background to this comparison is Angeliki

    Spiropoulou's (2010) theory on the shared opinion of Walter Benjamin and Virginia

    Woolf, on how art history is a constructed narrative, which, as Woolf has illustrated by

    her use of Orlando in Orlando, has favoured male artists over women artists and their

    work. My analysis of Woolf’s Orlando, and the subsequent analysis of the artist

    Fransescho del Cossa's role in How to Be Both shows that Smith's similar use of

    century-travelling and gender-bending in her character reinforces Woolf's point that

    artistry has been unfairly gendered throughout history, and that this has slowly changed

    towards a larger acceptance of women artists. Furthermore, How to Be Both especially

    highlights the importance of understanding historical accounts as constructed

    narratives, by making the reader question who the narrator behind Fransescho's story

    is.

    Each novel also shows the importance which clothes have in marking a person's

    gender, and therefore the characters are directly affected in their artistry depending on

    the clothes they wear. Moreover, this essay shows that both novels have a similar

    perspective on the creativity process, with both of their characters detaching themselves

    from their own gender identity when creating art through painting and writing.

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  • 686.
    Wåghäll Nivre, Elisabeth
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Slavic and Baltic Studies, Finnish, Dutch, and German.
    A Dangerous Place to Be: Fearing City Life in Georg Wickram’s Von guten und bösen Nachbaurn (1556)2017In: Tears, sighs and laughter: expressions of emotions in the Middle Ages / [ed] Per Förnegård, Erika Kihlman, Mia Åkestam, Gunnel Engwall, Stockholm: Kungl. Vitterhets Historie och Antikvitets Akademien, 2017, p. 138-152Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

     “You should know / that also other Portuguese men from Lisbon are in this city of Antwerp/ and not few of them / especially two shabby, evil lads / […]” (Von guten und bösen Nachbaurn, 1969: 143, trans. EWN). When the young Portuguese apprentice Lasarus comes to Antwerp to improve his skills as a craftsman he is immediately introduced to the evils of the city by a friend, thus quickly learning that the big city offers no safety and that people around him can be divided into “us” (good) and “them” (evil). The hero in Georg Wickram’s prose novel from 1556 does not seek knightly adventures on his travels but rather security and a quiet place where he can live together with the woman he loves. Lasarus wants to make a living as goldsmith in an urban setting but he is constantly threatened by malicious characters in the text. He fears for his life and is heartbroken at the same time, far away from home and his beloved Amelia who made him speechless of sorrow when he had to leave her for his travels to foreign cities.

     Hatred, crime and violence characterize life in the early modern city and Wickram’s protagonists have to proceed tactically, adjust to the dangers surrounding them, and to work hard to create a safe haven in large, dangerous cities like Antwerp and Venice. They rarely show strong emotions in public but suffer quietly, worry, and cry when alone without friends and family. Wickram’s text is one of the earliest prose novels in German language depicting city life and city dwellers and connecting the urban space with primarily dark sides of society. The chapter investigates the quickly growing early modern city as a place for criminal behavior, violence, fear and force as expressed in Wickram’s text. The aim is to show how the characters deal with situations of conflict and how they express and cope with their emotions.

  • 687.
    Wåghäll Nivre, Elisabeth
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Slavic and Baltic Studies, Finnish, Dutch, and German.
    Bücher unterwegs: Die Plünderung deutscher Büchersammlungen durch die Schweden im Dreißigjährigen Krieg2017In: Zwischen Thronsaal und Frawenzimmer  Handlungsfelder pommerscher Fürstinnen um 1600 im Vergleich / [ed] Dirk Schleinert, Monika Schneikart, Köln: Böhlau, 2017, p. 335-346Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 688.
    Wåghäll Nivre, Elisabeth
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Slavic and Baltic Studies, Finnish, Dutch, and German, German.
    Grenzen des Enzyklopädischen? Erfahrungen von der Stadt als Lebens- und Wirkungsraum im frühneuzeitlichen Prosaroman2019In: Enzyklopädisches Erzählen und vormoderne Romanpoetik (1400 –1700) / [ed] Mathias Herweg, Johannes Klaus Kipf, Dirk Werle, Wiesbaden: Harrassowitz Verlag, 2019, p. 201-216Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [de]

    Die Bedeutung der Stadt in der frühen Neuzeit und einer in wachsendem Ausmaß auf Lesen und Schreiben aufbauenden städtischen Kultur für die Entstehung volkssprachiger Literatur, nicht zuletzt des Prosaromans, ist in der Forschung in den letzten Jahrzehnten ausführlich diskutiert worden (bspw. Kleinschmidt 1982, Peters 1983, Garber 1998, Meier 2004). Die Stadt wird zum Ort des literarischen Austausches, der Erfahrungs- und Wissensvermittlung, sowohl der Gelehrten als auch des heranwachsenden Bürgertums. Die Stadt findet auch in vielen Prosatexten der Zeit Erwähnung, sei es in itinerarischen Darstellungen (im Faustbuch), als konkreter Wohnort und Ort der Handlung (Von guten und bösen Nachbarn) oder als Kontrast und Gegensatz zum ‚Hof‘ und ‚Höfischen‘ (Magelone). Ein deutliches Interesse an der Stadt – das Wissen über sie bzw. über das, was sich in ihr abspielt –  lässt sich in vielen Prosaromanen herauslesen. Die Stadt wird nicht nur enzyklopädisch erwähnt, um das Wissen des Autors zu dokumentieren, sondern sie ist zugleich Träger(in) von Erkenntnis und Erfahrung und bekommt somit eine doppelte Funktion in den Texten. Bisher ist die Funktion ‚der Stadt‘ im Kontext des enzyklopädischen  Erzählens oder der Wissensvermittlung im Prosaroman nicht systematisch erfasst worden. Ziel dieses Beitrages ist es deshalb, die textuelle, sprachlich-rhetorische Verarbeitung von ‚Stadt‘ in einigen Beispielstexten zu untersuchen, um die Funktion der Stadt als Bestandteil einer enzyklopädischen Narration herauszuarbeiten, die danach strebt dem Leser nicht nur Weltwissen, sondern auch Weltgewandtheit zu vermitteln.

  • 689.
    Wåghäll Nivre, Elisabeth
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Slavic and Baltic Studies, Finnish, Dutch, and German, German.
    Vem talar och i vilket syfte? Berättarröst och pratglada protagonister i Georg Wickrams prosaromaner2022In: Årsbok 2022, Stockholm: Kungl. Vitterhets Historie och Antikvitets Akademien, 2022, p. 47-59Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 690.
    Wåghäll Nivre, Elisabeth
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Slavic and Baltic Studies, Finnish, Dutch, and German.
    Würdigung2016In: Materialität und Formation: Studien zum Buchdruck des 15. bis 17. Jahrhunderts: Festschrift für Monika Unzeitig / [ed] Karin Cieslik, Helge Perplies, Florian Schmid, Bremen: edition lumière, 2016, p. 11-16Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [de]

    Das Medium ‚Buch‘ ist im 15. bis 17. Jahrhundert durch eine Fülle von Veränderungen in seiner Materialität und in der Formation seiner Inhalte gekennzeichnet. Im Mittelpunkt stehen in diesem Band die Interdependenz und Interferenz von sprachlicher, graphischer und bildlicher Codierung. In den einzelnen Beiträgen werden Zeugnisse unterschiedlicher Sprach- und Kulturräume aus der Perspektive ver­schiedener Wissenschaftsdisziplinen – Germanistik, Romanistik, Kunst­­geschichte, Buchwissenschaft – hinsichtlich der Beziehungen von Handschrift und Druck, von Text und Bild oder der konkreten Ge­staltung des Textes in den Blick genommen. Der gewählte Ansatz ermöglicht es, aus der materiellen Beschaffenheit und formalen Gestaltung der Überlieferungsträger in ihrer histo­ri­schen Besonderheit sowohl ästhetische als auch inhaltsbezogene As­pek­te dieses Wandels vor dem Hintergrund ökonomischer Erfor­der­nisse oder der spezifischen Rezeptionsbedingungen und -erwar­tun­gen zu be­leuchten und damit das Wissen über das Medium ‚Buch‘ fort­zuschreiben.

  • 691.
    Xerri, Sabrina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    A piece of cake? High school students' retention of idioms: A comparative study of teaching idioms by means of illustrations and definitions respectively2018Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This study aims at investigating teaching of idioms by means of illustrations and teaching of idioms by means of definitions. The informants of the experiment are learners of English in a Swedish high school. The 58 informants of this experiment were tested on a total of 19 idioms. These idioms were carefully chosen in order to make sure that they would not already be known by the informants. Another key factor while choosing the idioms was the possibility to find appropriate illustrations for these idioms. The chosen illustrations depict either the literal or the metaphorical meaning of the idioms. The informants were administered one pre-test and two post-tests (short- and long-term retention tests) to measure the retention rate. The pre-test was used to check if both groups had similar knowledge of the selected idioms and therefore could be comparable. The results of this experiment show that students taught by the use of illustrations had a better short- and long-term retention rate than students taught only by the use of definitions. In both the short- and long-term retention test, informants taught by the use of illustrations outperformed informants taught through definition by more than 10%. This study therefore indicates that the use of illustrations while teaching should not be neglected by teachers and can be a powerful tool to enhance students’ retention of chosen items such as vocabulary or idioms.

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  • 692.
    Zadencka, Maria
    Stockholm University.
    Józef Mackiewicz i zwycięstwo prowokacji2009In: Józef Mackiewicz i krytycy: Antologia tekstów / [ed] Marek Zybura, Łomianki: LTW , 2009, p. 363-398Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 693.
    Zadencka, Maria
    Stockholm University.
    Witold Gombrowicz: scener i det icke-euklidiska rummet2010In: Röster om Gombrowicz / [ed] Anders Bodegård, Janusz Korek, Leonard Neuger, Stockholm: Stockholm University, 2010, p. 125-143Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 694.
    Zalazar, Marco
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    The Word for World is Forest: A multidisciplinary approach to teaching about genocide2023Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The current position proposed as a possible antidote to future human conflicts is to educate our students about the horrific consequences of past atrocities. To this end, this research paper will examine the possibilities of teaching the students to recognize and reject dehumanizing attitudes in society. The concept of dehumanization and our collective capacity to prevent or resist such attitudes in society will be introduced by reading Ursula K. Le Guin’s novella The Word for World is Forest [Forest] from 1972. The close reading of the novella will be examined in adherence to Suvin’s theory of cognitive estrangement, in which the novella’s ability to act as a mediator for past and current historical events will be explored. The goal is to raise awareness of the many factors that may precede genocide and broadening the students’ capabilities of recognizing historical patterns. The main concepts for this study will primarily be adopted from the academic field of psychology in order to study the social roles each character reflects in relation to the notion of Triangle of Genocide. Secondly, different historical perspectives will be considered to correlate events from the book with historical equivalents. Lastly, from Socratic pedagogy to address complex questions and address them in an educational framework titled Peace Education. This paper aims to contribute with a unique approach to the reading of Le Guin’s novella and suggests didactic methods for implementation focusing primarily on upper secondary students in a Swedish school setting.

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  • 695.
    Zetterström, Johanna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Culture and Aesthetics.
    Flicka, pojke, människa: En intersektionell genusstudie med särskilt fokus på maskulinitet i Jessica Schiefauers ungdomsroman Pojkarna2022Independent thesis Advanced level (professional degree), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [sv]

    Den här studien undersöker Jessica Shiefauers ungdomsroman Pojkarna ur ett intersektionellt, genus och maskulinitetsteoretiskt perspektiv. Analysen handlar om hur genus konstrueras och framställs i samverkan med andra kategorier som ålder och sexualitet, men också vad som präglar pojkars umgängeskoder i romanen och hur huvudkaraktären Kims upplevelse av sin egen kropp och identitet utvecklas i förhållande till detta. Vidare ligger även fokus vid romanens normbrytande och/eller normreproducerande effekter. Den metod som använts är kvalitativ, litterär textanalys. Studiens främsta genusteoretiska nyckelbegrepp är performativitet, den heterosexuella matrisen, hegemonisk manlighet och homosocialitet.

    Resultatet visar att framställningen av kön är skildrat på ett polariserande sätt genom två binära motsatspar i form av maskulinitet- och femininitetsideal. Dessa fungerar som ett verkningsmedel för att synliggöra den heterosexuella matrisens begränsningar för individer som faller utanför normen. Framställningen tolkas i huvudsak som normbrytande tack vare huvudkaraktären Kims uppror mot normen, även om den binära motsatsbeskrivningen bidrar till att reproducera normer. Analysen visar att pojkars umgängeskoder i romanen är starkt präglade av ett hegemoniskt maskulinitetsideal och ett traditionellt manligt homosocialt umgänge vilket i sin tur även verkar diskriminerande gentemot den underordnade formen av manlighet.

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  • 696.
    Zumpano Coacci, Julián
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Romance Studies and Classics.
    Espacios tortuosos en la última dictadura cívico-militar de la República Argentina (1976- 1983): Espacio y trauma en la narrativa de Luisa Valenzuela2021Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Since the theory of trauma was proposed by Cathy Caruth in the nineties of the last century, trauma studies have once again obtained the attention of literary criticism. Although Caruth’s approach is primarily psychoanalytical, it is also based on historiographical and sociological perspectives. Consequently, her theory is especially useful to the current study when analyzing a selection of works by Luisa Valenzuela, that take place during the last Argentinian military dictatorship (1976-1983). Specifically, it is intended to analyze the influence that confinement has on characters, beginning from an analysis that regards both the representation of the narrative space and the representation of trauma. The method applied will be that of a close reading of the stories, articulating Bachelard's notions of house and dialect of inside and outside to examine, on the one hand, confinement in public and private spaces and, on the other hand, a construction of trauma that follows Caruth’s theory from three different psychological perspectives to better understand torture. Along these lines, this study’s contribution consists of carrying out a reading of Valenzuela's selected literary works, in order to understand to what degree confinement influences the trauma that torture causes during the dictatorship.

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  • 697.
    Zumpano Coacci, Julián
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Romance Studies and Classics.
    Monstruosidad, otredad y proceso de humanización en las reelaboraciones del minotauro de Borges y Cortázar: Un estudio comparativo de las obras “La casa de Asterión” y Los reyes2019Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The principal objective of this research is to investigate the minotaur´s portrait in the reinterpretations proposed by Borges, in his short story entitled “The House of Asterion”, and by Cortázar, in his play The Kings. The comparison is made in relation to the concepts of monstrosity and otherness and the ethics of humanism of the Other presented by Levinas. This is a comparative study that aims to analyze the classical myth of the minotaur and the two versions that emerged simultaneously in South America. The research questions refer, first, to the interest in the literary genres chosen by the Argentinian authors that prepare the ground for the creation of humanized minotaurs. Second, to the marginal position to which the monster is relegated. Finally, to the inversion produced in their aesthetic constructions, where the minotaur is recognized and would later becomea wake-up call to society to take responsibility for the monsters it creates.

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  • 698.
    Öberg, Marcus
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Belief and Religion in Terry Pratchett’s The Hogfather2018Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Being widely known as comedy fantasy, Terry Pratchett’s Discworld series has been highly regarded by fans and critics alike. While known for their comic tone, Pratchett’s novels have also dealt with grave topics, such as the power of belief and the notion that gods are created, destroyed and made relevant through belief and worship. Yet, there is a distinct gap in academic literature investigating Pratchett’s ideas concerning the nature of both belief and religion. Although Amanda Cockrell has touched upon similar subjects, this paper will address the nature of belief and religion in the Discworld further, by focusing on the novel The Hogfather. I argue that The Hogfather suggests humans are capable of giving meaning to the world around them through the power of belief, and that religion is created by humans to make the world around them more meaningful. In Pratchett’s Discworld, humans have created gods to make sense of what they cannot understand and in this way, they try to bring meaning to the world around them. Furthermore, I argue that The Hogfather presents a case for the importance of religious belief in a modern, secularised world. By presenting “Hogswatch”—the Discworld equivalent of Christmas—as a satire of belief and tradition, Pratchett suggests that, in the end, both secular and religious worldviews should co-exist.

  • 699.
    Östberg, Urban
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Scandinavian Languages.
    Familjeuppgörelse i sjukhusmiljö: Recension av Anna Enquist: Bedövarna2013In: Horisont, ISSN 0439-5530, no 4, p. 65-67Article, book review (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 700.
    Österdahl, Pontus
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Romance Studies and Classics.
    Pindaric Scholarship between Aristarchus and Didymus: An Edition of the Fragments with Explanatory Notes and a Discussion of Early Pindaric Scholarship2021Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this thesis is to explore Hellenistic scholarship on Pindar in the period between Aristarchus and Didymus. Although no ancient scholarly work on Pindar survives in its entirety, the Pindar scholia and other indirect sources show that about a dozen scholars known by name worked on Pindar in the period studied.

    The present study sets out to collect and edit anew the fragments of these scholars, as well as to analyse their content and situate them within the wider context of Hellenistic scholarship. The thesis consists of two parts. Part I serves the purpose of a general commentary on Hellenistic scholarship on Pindar. Chapter 2 situates the collected fragments within the larger context of Hellenistic scholarship with a focus on the work of Aristarchus and Didymus, questioning the view that Aristarchus did not take an historical view of Pindar’s poetry. Chapter 3 identifies the Pindaric scholars active in the period studied and explores their work in individual sections. Chapter 4 focuses on Pindaric scholarship in general. It shows that the ancient Pindarists generally did not restrict themselves to interpreting Pindar by his own works exclusively, but used all information available to them when interpreting the poet.

    Part II contains the actual collection of fragments of named and known Pindarists contemporary with or active between Aristarchus and Didymus. It is accompanied by an English translation along with a commentary on details of language, transmission and content.

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