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  • 1. Adolfson, Malin
    et al.
    Laseen, Stefan
    Linde, Jesper
    Svensson, Lars E. O.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for International Economic Studies. Stockholm School of Economics, Sweden; NBER, United States.
    Monetary policy trade-offs in an estimated open-economy DSGE model2014In: Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, ISSN 0165-1889, E-ISSN 1879-1743, Vol. 42, p. 33-49Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper studies the trade-offs between stabilizing CPI inflation and alternative measures of the output gap in Ramses, the Riksbank's estimated dynamic stochastic general equilibrium (DSGE) model of a small open economy. Our main finding is that the trade-off between stabilizing CPI inflation and the output gap strongly depends on which concept of potential output in the output gap between output and potential output is used in the loss function. If potential output is defined as a smooth trend this trade-off is much more pronounced compared to the case when potential output is defined as the output level that would prevail if prices and wages were flexible.

  • 2. Andersson, Rune
    et al.
    Calmfors, Lars
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for International Economic Studies.
    Bergström, Hans
    Feldt, Kjell-Olov
    Hansson, Åsa
    Henrekson, Magnus
    Lodin, Sven-Olof
    Melz, Peter
    Åsbrink, Erik
    Öberg, Ann
    Skattesystemet ett lappverk – en ny stor reform behövs2014In: Dagens nyheter, ISSN 1101-2447Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 3.
    Balleer, Almut
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for International Economic Studies.
    Gehrke, Britta
    Lechthaler, Wolfgang
    Merkl, Christian
    Does Short-Time Work Save Jobs? A Business Cycle Analysis2014Report (Other academic)
  • 4.
    Balleer, Almut
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for International Economic Studies.
    Gehrke, Britta
    Merkl, Christian
    Some Surprising Facts About Working Time Accounts and the Business Cycle2014Report (Other academic)
  • 5.
    Balleer, Almut
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for International Economic Studies. RWTH Aachen University, Germany .
    Gomez-Salvador, Ramon
    Turunen, Jarkko
    Labour force participation across Europe: a cohort-based analysis2014In: Empirical Economics, ISSN 0377-7332, E-ISSN 1435-8921, Vol. 46, no 4, p. 1385-1415Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We use a cohort-based model to analyse the determinants of labour force participation in six European economies, focusing on age and cohort effects as factors explaining differences in participation behaviour across countries. Cohort effects are particularly relevant for women with those born in the late 1960s and early 1970s more likely to participate over the life-cycle. Our results suggest that cohort effects can be interpreted as evolving social norms or preferences towards participating in the labour market according to Fernandez (NBER working paper no. 13373, 2007). We find substantial variation in the estimated age and cohort effects across European countries: cohort effects can account for a substantial part of the recent increase in participation in Spain, the Netherlands and Germany, and a positive, but smaller part of in the increase in participation of the UK, Italy and France. Looking forward, positive cohort effects could help counteract the downward impact of population ageing on participation.

  • 6.
    Baltrunaite, Audinga
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for International Economic Studies.
    Bello, Piera
    Casarico, Alessandra
    Profeta, Paola
    Gender quotas and the quality of politicians2014In: Journal of Public Economics, ISSN 0047-2727, E-ISSN 1879-2316, Vol. 118, p. 62-74Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We analyze the effects of the introduction of gender quotas in candidate lists on the quality of elected politicians, as measured by the average number of years of education. We consider an Italian law which introduced gender quotas in local elections in 1993, and was abolished in 1995. As not all municipalities went through elections during this period, we identify two groups of municipalities and use a Difference in differences estimation. We find that gender quotas are associated with an increase in the quality of elected politicians, with the effect ranging from 0.12 to 0.24 years of education. This effect is due not only to the higher number of elected women, who are on average more educated than men, but also to the lower number of low-educated elected men. The positive effect on quality is confirmed when we measure the latter with alternative indicators, it persists in the long run and it is robust to controlling for political ideology and political competition.

  • 7.
    Baltrunaite, Audinga
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for International Economic Studies.
    Casarico, Alessandra
    Profeta, Paola
    Spill-Over Effects of Affirmative Action: political Representation and the Power of the Elderly2014Report (Refereed)
  • 8. Bennmarker, Helge
    et al.
    Calmfors, Lars
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for International Economic Studies.
    Seim, Anna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economics.
    Earned Income Tax Credits, Unemployment Benefits and Wages: empirical Evidence from Sweden2014In: IZA Journal of Labor Policy, ISSN 2193-9004, E-ISSN 2193-9004, Vol. 3, no 54Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 9.
    Besley, Tim
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for International Economic Studies.
    Persson, Torsten
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for International Economic Studies.
    Why Do Developing Countries Tax So Little?2014In: Journal of Economic Perspectives, ISSN 0895-3309, E-ISSN 1944-7965, Vol. 28, no 4, p. 99-120Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 10.
    Besley, Timothy
    et al.
    London School of Economics, United Kingdom; Canadian Institute for Advanced Research, Canada.
    Persson, Torsten
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for International Economic Studies. Canadian Institute for Advanced Research, Canada.
    The Causes and Consequences of Development Clusters: State Capacity, Peace and Income2014In: Annual Review of Economics, ISSN 1941-1383, E-ISSN 1941-1391, Vol. 6, p. 927-949Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Three important aspects of development-per capita income, state capabilities, and (the absence of) political violence-are correlated with each other at the country level. This article discusses the causes of such development clusters and highlights two explanations: common economic, political, and social drivers and complementarities (two-way positive feedbacks). It also draws out preliminary policy implications of these patterns of development and proposes topics for further research.

  • 11.
    Boppart, Timo
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for International Economic Studies. University of Zurich, Switzerland.
    Structural Change and the Kaldor Facts in a Growth Model With Relative Price Effects and Non-Gorman Preferences2014In: Econometrica, ISSN 0012-9682, E-ISSN 1468-0262, Vol. 82, no 6, p. 2167-2196Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    U.S. data reveal three facts: (1) the share of goods in total expenditure declines at a constant rate over time, (2) the price of goods relative to services declines at a constant rate over time, and (3) poor households spend a larger fraction of their budget on goods than do rich households. I provide a macroeconomic model with non-Gorman preferences that rationalizes these facts, along with the aggregate Kaldor facts. The model is parsimonious and admits an analytical solution. Its functional form allows a decomposition of U.S. structural change into an income and substitution effect. Estimates from micro data show each of these effects to be of roughly equal importance.

  • 12.
    Boppart, Timo
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for International Economic Studies. University of Zurich, Switzerland.
    Falkinger, Josef
    Grossmann, Volker
    Protestantism and education: reading (the Bible) and other skills2014In: Economic Inquiry, ISSN 0095-2583, E-ISSN 1465-7295, Vol. 52, no 2, p. 874-895Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    During industrialization, Protestants were more literate than Catholics. This paper investigates whether this fact may be led back to the intrinsic motivation of Protestants to read the bible and to what extent other education motives might have been involved as well. We employ a historical data set from Switzerland which allows us to differentiate between different cognitive skills: reading, numeracy, essay writing, and Swiss history. We develop an estimation strategy to examine whether the impact of religious denomination was particularly large with respect to reading capabilities. We find support for this hypothesis. However, we also find evidence which is consistent with the view that Protestants' education motives went beyond acquiring reading skills. (JEL I20)

  • 13.
    Boppart, Timo
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for International Economic Studies.
    Staub, Kevin E.
    Online Accessibility of Scholarly Literature, and Academic Innovation2014Report (Refereed)
  • 14.
    Broer, Tobias
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for International Economic Studies.
    Domestic or global imbalances?: Rising income risk and the fall in the US current account2014In: Journal of Monetary Economics, ISSN 0304-3932, E-ISSN 1873-1295, Vol. 64, p. 47-67Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    When default leads to exclusion from financial markets, the implied loss of consumption smoothing opportunities is more costly when income volatility is high. A rise in income risk thus makes default less attractive, allowing creditors to relax borrowing limits. I show how, in an open economy, this endogenous financial deepening may reduce aggregate foreign assets in response to a rise in individual income risk, against the precautionary savings intuition. Conditions for this depend on whether default constrains complete or uncontingent contracts. The post-1980 rise in US household income risk strongly reduces foreign assets when domestic markets are complete or world interest rates low.

  • 15.
    Burchardi, Konrad B.
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for International Economic Studies.
    Penczynski, Stefan P.
    Out of your mind: Eliciting individual reasoning in one shot games2014In: Games and Economic Behavior, ISSN 0899-8256, E-ISSN 1090-2473, Vol. 84, p. 39-57Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We experimentally investigate the fundamental element of the level-k model of reasoning, the level-0 actions and beliefs. We use data from a novel experimental design that allows us to obtain incentivised written accounts of individuals' reasoning. In particular, these accounts allow to infer level-0 beliefs. Level-0 beliefs are not significantly different from 50, and almost 60% of higher level players start their reasoning from a level-0 belief of exactly 50. We also estimate that around one third of the participants play non-strategically. The non-strategic level-0 actions are not uniformly distributed.

  • 16.
    Calmfors, Lars
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for International Economic Studies.
    Blytunga experter: återinför fastighetsskatten2014In: Dagens Industri, ISSN 0346-640X, no JanArticle in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 17.
    Calmfors, Lars
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for International Economic Studies.
    Budgeten ger inga enkla lösningar2014In: Dagens Nyheter, ISSN 1101-2447, no NovArticle in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 18.
    Calmfors, Lars
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for International Economic Studies.
    Ett nytt projekt i mitten2014In: Dagens Nyheter, ISSN 1101-2447, Vol. 23, no Sep, p. 1Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 19.
    Calmfors, Lars
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for International Economic Studies.
    Finlands sak är svår2014In: Dagens Nyheter, ISSN 1101-2447, no FebArticle in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 20.
    Calmfors, Lars
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for International Economic Studies.
    How Well is the Nordic Model Doing? Recent Performance and Future Challenges2014In: The Nordic Model: challenged but capable of reform / [ed] T. Valkonen and V. Vihriälä, Köpenhamn: Nordiska ministerrådet , 2014Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 21.
    Calmfors, Lars
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for International Economic Studies.
    Jobben är en dålig valfråga2014In: Dagens nyheter, ISSN 1101-2447Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 22.
    Calmfors, Lars
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for International Economic Studies.
    Löneskillnaderna är för små2014In: Dagens Nyheter, ISSN 1101-2447, no MarArticle in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 23.
    Calmfors, Lars
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for International Economic Studies.
    Piketty ställer nödvändiga frågor2014In: Dagens Nyheter, ISSN 1101-2447, no AugArticle in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 24.
    Calmfors, Lars
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for International Economic Studies.
    Skattereform kräver tryck i välfärdsfrågan2014In: En skattereform för 2000-talet: elva röster om hur Sverige får ett bättre skattesystem / [ed] Mats Bergstrand, Stockholm: pmj , 2014Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 25.
    Calmfors, Lars
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for International Economic Studies.
    Skatterna kan bli bättre2014In: Dagens Nyheter, ISSN 1101-2447, no JulArticle in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 26.
    Calmfors, Lars
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for International Economic Studies.
    Svårt att diskutera löneskillnader2014In: Dagens Nyheter, ISSN 1101-2447, no 29 aprilArticle in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 27.
    Calmfors, Lars
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for International Economic Studies.
    Våga diskutera överskottsmålet2014In: Dagens Nyheter, ISSN 1101-2447, no JunArticle in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 28.
    Calmfors, Lars
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for International Economic Studies.
    Åtta dåliga argument i valdebatten2014In: Dagens nyheter, ISSN 1101-2447Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 29.
    Calmfors, Lars
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for International Economic Studies.
    Heldin, Carl-Henrik
    Kragic Jansfelt, Danica
    Larsson, Mats
    Lidén, Kerstin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Lidin, Sven
    Sjöberg, Britt-Marie
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Öquist, Gunnar
    Dåliga jobbvillkor gör att Sverige tappar elitforskare2014In: Dagens nyheter, ISSN 1101-2447Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 30.
    Calmfors, Lars
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for International Economic Studies.
    Josephson, Staffan
    Månson, Jan-Anders
    Ullenius, Christina
    Wennberg, Suzanne
    Borgegård, Ylva
    SSF - att vara eller icke vara?: En granskning av Stiftelsen för strategisk forskning2014Report (Other academic)
  • 31.
    de Quidt, Jonathan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for International Economic Studies.
    Your Loss Is My Gain: a Recruitment Experiment With Framed Incentives2014Report (Other academic)
  • 32.
    Duernecker, Georg
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for International Economic Studies.
    Technology and Adoption, Turbulence and the Dynamics of Unemployment2014In: Journal of the European Economic Association, ISSN 1542-4766, E-ISSN 1542-4774, Vol. 12, no 3, p. 724-754Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 33.
    Duernecker, Georg
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for International Economic Studies.
    Herrendorf, Berthold
    On the Allocation of Time2014Report (Other academic)
  • 34.
    Flam, Harry
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for International Economic Studies.
    Vestman, Roine
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economics.
    Sverigefonder ger lägre avkastning än börsen2014In: Dagens Nyheter, ISSN 1101-2447Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 35.
    Flam, Harry
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for International Economic Studies.
    Vestman, Roine
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economics.
    Swedish Equity Mutual Funds: performance, Persistence, and Presence of Skill2014Report (Other academic)
  • 36.
    Fredriksson, Anders
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for International Economic Studies. University of Namur, Belgium; University of Sao Paulo, Brazil.
    Bureaucracy intermediaries, corruption and red tape2014In: Journal of Development Economics, ISSN 0304-3878, E-ISSN 1872-6089, Vol. 108, p. 256-273Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Intermediaries that assist individuals and firms with the government bureaucracy are common in developing countries. Although such bureaucracy intermediaries are, anecdotally, linked with corruption and welfare losses, few formal analyses exist. We introduce a model in which a government license can benefit individuals. We study the net license gain when individuals get the license through the regular licensing procedure, through bribing or through intermediaries. For a given procedure, individuals using intermediaries are better off than if intermediaries and corruption had not existed. Then, we study the incentives of corrupt bureaucrats to create red tape. Bureaucrats implement more red tape and individuals are unambiguously worse off in a setting with intermediaries than with direct corruption only. Intermediaries can thus improve access to the bureaucracy, but also strengthen the incentives to create red tape a potential explanation why licensing procedures tend to be long in developing countries.

  • 37. Golosov, Mikhail
    et al.
    Hassler, John
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for International Economic Studies.
    Krusell, Per
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for International Economic Studies.
    Tsyvinski, Aleh
    Optimal Taxes on Fossil Fuel in General Equilibrium2014In: Econometrica, ISSN 0012-9682, E-ISSN 1468-0262, Vol. 82, no 1, p. 41-88Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We analyze a dynamic stochastic general-equilibrium (DSGE) model with an externality—through climate change—from using fossil energy. Our central result is a simple formula for the marginal externality damage of emissions (or, equivalently, for the optimal carbon tax). This formula, which holds under quite plausible assumptions, reveals that the damage is proportional to current GDP, with the proportion depending only on three factors: (i) discounting, (ii) the expected damage elasticity (how many percent of the output flow is lost from an extra unit of carbon in the atmosphere), and (iii) the structure of carbon depreciation in the atmosphere. Thus, the stochastic values of future output, consumption, and the atmospheric CO2 concentration, as well as the paths of technology (whether endogenous or exogenous) and population, and so on, all disappear from the formula. We find that the optimal tax should be a bit higher than the median, or most well-known, estimates in the literature. We also formulate a parsimonious yet comprehensive and easily solved model allowing us to compute the optimal and market paths for the use of different sources of energy and the corresponding climate change. We find coal—rather than oil—to be the main threat to economic welfare, largely due to its abundance. We also find that the costs of inaction are particularly sensitive to the assumptions regarding the substitutability of different energy sources and technological progress.

  • 38.
    Grönqvist, Hans
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Nilsson, J. Peter
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for International Economic Studies.
    Robling, Per Olof
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Childhood Lead Exposure and Criminal Behavior: Lessons from the Swedish Phase-Out of Leaded Gasoline2014Report (Other academic)
  • 39.
    Guariso, Andrea
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for International Economic Studies. Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Belgium.
    Squicciarini, Mara P.
    Swinnen, Johan
    Food Price Shocks and the Political Economy of Global Agricultural and Development Policy2014In: Applied Economic Perspectives and Policy, ISSN 2040-5790, E-ISSN 2040-5804, Vol. 36, no 3, p. 387-415Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The recent spikes of global food prices induced a rapid increase in mass media coverage, public policy attention, and donor funding for food security and for agriculture and rural poverty. This has occurred while the shift from low to high food prices has induced a shift in (demographic or social) location of the hunger and poverty effects, but the total number of undernourished and poor people has declined over the same period. We suggest that the observed pattern can be explained by the presence of a global urban bias on agriculture and food policy in developing countries, and we discuss whether this global urban bias may actually benefit poor farmers. We argue that the food price spikes have succeeded where others have failed in the past: to move the problems of poor and hungry farmers to the top of the policy agenda and to induce development and donor strategies to help them.

  • 40.
    Gärtner, Manja
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economics.
    Sandberg, Anna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for International Economic Studies.
    Omission Effects in Fairness Behavior2014Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    We investigate whether individuals are more prone to act selfishly if they can passively allow

    for an outcome to be implemented (omission) rather than having to make an active choice

    (commission). In most settings, active and passive choice alternatives differ in terms of factors

    such as defaults, costs of taking an action, and awareness. Isolating the distinction between

    active and passive choices in an experiment, we find no omission effect in fairness behavior.

    This suggests that increased selfishness through omission, as observed in various economic

    choice situations, is driven by these other factors rather than a preference for selfish omissions.

  • 41.
    Hansen, Niels-Jakob Harbo
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for International Economic Studies.
    Yang, Guan
    Har staten købt verdens dyreste forsikring af Goldman Sachs?2014In: Dagbladet InformationArticle in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 42.
    Hederos Eriksson, Karin
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Hjalmarsson, R.
    Lindquist, M.
    Sandberg, Anna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for International Economic Studies.
    The Importance of Family Background and Neighborhood Effects in Determinants of Crime2014Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    We quantify the importance of family background and neighborhood effects as determinants of criminal convictions and incarceration by estimating sibling and neighborhood correlations. At the extensive margin, factors common to siblings account for 24 percent of the variation in criminal convictions and 39 percent of the variation in incarceration. At the intensive margin, these factors typically account for slightly less than half of the variation in prison sentence length and between one-third and one-half of the variation in criminal convictions, depending on crime type and gender. Neighborhood correlations, on the other hand, are quite small. We, therefore, conclude that these large sibling correlations are most likely generated by family influences and not by neighborhood influences. Further analysis shows that parental criminality and family structure contribute more to sibling similarities in crime than parental income and education or neighborhood characteristics. The lions’ share of the sibling crime correlations, however, are unexplained by these factors. Finally, sibling spacing also matters – more closely spaced siblings are more similar in their criminal behavior

  • 43. Jans, Jenny
    et al.
    Johansson, Per
    Nilsson, Peter
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for International Economic Studies.
    Economic Status, Air Quality, and Child Health: evidence from Inversion Episodes2014Report (Other academic)
  • 44.
    Jia, Ruixue
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for International Economic Studies.
    THE LEGACIES OF FORCED FREEDOM: CHINA'S TREATY PORTS2014In: Review of Economics and Statistics, ISSN 0034-6535, E-ISSN 1530-9142, Vol. 96, no 4, p. 596-608Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper investigates the long-run development of China's treaty ports from the mid-eighteenth century until today. Focusing on a sample of prefectures on the coast or on the Yangtze River, I document the dynamic development paths of treaty ports and their neighbors in alternate phases of closedness and openness. I also provide suggestive evidence on migration and sector-wise growth to understand the advantage of treaty ports in the long run.

  • 45.
    Jia, Ruixue
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for International Economic Studies.
    WEATHER SHOCKS, SWEET POTATOES AND PEASANT REVOLTS IN HISTORICAL CHINA2014In: Economic Journal, ISSN 0013-0133, E-ISSN 1468-0297, Vol. 124, no 575, p. 92-118Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    I use data covering 267 prefectures over four centuries to investigate two questions about historical China. To what extent did weather shocks cause civil conflict? And to what extent did the historical introduction of (drought resistant) sweet potatoes mitigate these effects? I find that before the introduction of sweet potatoes, exceptional droughts increased the probability of peasant revolts by around 0.7 percentage points, which translates into a revolt probability in drought years that is more than twice the average revolt probability. After the introduction of sweet potatoes, exceptional droughts only increased the probability of peasant revolts by around 0.2 percentage points.

  • 46. Johansson, Per-Olov
    et al.
    Karimi, Arizo
    Nilsson, Peter
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for International Economic Studies. IFAU, Uppsala University; Uppsala Center for Labor Studies.
    Gender differences in shirking: monitoring or social preferences? : evidence from a field experiment2014Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper studies gender differences in the extent to which social preferences affect workers’ shirking decisions. Using exogenous variation in work absence induced by a randomized field experiment that increased treated workers’ absence, we find that also nontreated workers increased their absence as a response. Furthermore, we find that male workers react more strongly to decreased monitoring, but no significant gender difference in the extent to which workers are influenced by peers. However, our results suggest significant heterogeneity in the degree of influence that male and female workers exert on each other: conditional on the potential exposure to same-sex co-workers, men are only affected by their male peers, and women are only affected by their female peers.

  • 47.
    Karadja, Mounir
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for International Economic Studies.
    Möllerström, Johanna
    Seim, David
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economics.
    Richer (and Holier) Than Thou? The Effect of Relative Income Improvements on Demand for Redistribution2014Report (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We study the extent to which people are misinformed about their relative position in the income distribution and the effects on preferences for redistribution of correcting faulty beliefs. We implement a tailor-made survey in Sweden and document that a vast majority of Swedes believe that they are poorer, relative to others, than they actually are. This is true across groups, but younger, poorer, less cognitively able and less educated individuals have perceptions that are further from reality. Using a second survey, we conduct an experiment by randomly informing a subsample about their true relative income position. Respondents who learn that they are richer than they thought demand less redistribution and increase their support for the Conservative party.

    This result is entirely driven by prior right-of-center political preferences and not by altruism or moral values about redistribution. Moreover, the effect can be reconciled by people with political preferences to the right-of-center being more likely to view taxes as distortive and to believe that it is personal effort rather than luck that is most influential for individual economic success.

  • 48.
    Koehne, Sebastian
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for International Economic Studies.
    Kuhn, Moritz
    Optimal Taxation in a Habit Formation Economy2014Report (Refereed)
  • 49.
    Krusell, Per
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for International Economic Studies.
    Pikettys kritik av kapitalismen2014Report (Other academic)
  • 50.
    Lindbeck, Assar
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for International Economic Studies.
    Fenomenet Piketty2014In: Ekonomisk Debatt, ISSN 0345-2646, no 7, p. 11-19Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 51.
    Malmberg, Hannes
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for International Economic Studies.
    Hössjer, Ola
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Mathematics.
    Probabilistic choice with an infinite set of options: An Approach Based on Random Sup Measures2014In: Modern Problems in Insurance Mathematics / [ed] Dmitrii Silvestrov, Anders Martin-Löf, London: Springer, 2014, p. 291-312Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This chapter deals with probabilistic choice when the number of options is infinite. The choice space is a compact set S⊆R k   and we model choice over S  as a limit of choices over triangular sequences {x n1 ,…,x nn }⊆S  as n→∞  . We employ the theory of random sup measures and show that in the limit when n→∞  , people behave as though they are maximising over a random sup measure. Thus, our results complement Resnick and Roy’s [18] theory of probabilistic choice over infinite sets. They define choice as a maximisation over a stochastic process on S  with upper semi-continuous (usc) paths. This connects to our model as their random usc function can be defined as a sup-derivative of a random sup measure, and their maximisation problem can be transformed into a maximisation problem over this random sup measure. One difference remains though: with our model the limiting random sup measures are independently scattered, without usc paths. A benefit of our model is that we provide a way of connecting the stochastic process in their model with finite case distributional assumptions, which are easier to interpret. In particular, when choices are valued additively with one deterministic and one random part, we explore the importance of the tail behaviour of the random part, and show that the exponential distribution is an important boundary case between heavy-tailed and light-tailed distributions.

  • 52.
    Malmberg, Hannes
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for International Economic Studies.
    Öberg, Erik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for International Economic Studies.
    Hur presterar Sveriges arbetsmarknad?: en internationell jämförelse2014Report (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 53.
    Mitman, Kurt
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for International Economic Studies.
    Rabinovich, Stanislav
    Unemployment Benefit Extensions Caused Jobless Recoveries!?2014Report (Other academic)
  • 54.
    Nilsson, Peter
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for International Economic Studies.
    Starkölsförsöket: från fosterstadiet till vuxen ålder2014Report (Other academic)
  • 55.
    Olovsson, Conny
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for International Economic Studies.
    How does a pay-as-you-go system affect asset returns and the equity premium?2014In: Review of economic dynamics (Print), ISSN 1094-2025, E-ISSN 1096-6099, Vol. 17, no 1, p. 131-149Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    When applying a differences-in-differences approach, equity returns and the equity premium are both estimated to be more than four percentage points higher after the introduction of a pay-as-you-go (PAYGO) system. In a realistically calibrated model, the PAYGO system is also found to increase the returns and the premium, although the effects are smaller than in the data. Intuitively, the system lowers asset prices, which in turn increases the importance of dividend risk. Since only equity is subject to dividend risk, equity returns become more volatile relative to bond returns.

  • 56.
    Persson, Mats
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for International Economic Studies.
    Återinförd fastighetsskatt bättre än slopat ränteavdrag2014In: Dagens Nyheter, ISSN 1101-2447, Vol. 8, no AugArticle in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 57.
    Persson, Mats
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for International Economic Studies.
    Ellingsen, Tore
    Persson, Torsten
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for International Economic Studies.
    Sjöström, Thomas
    2014 års Ekonomipris till Jean Tirole2014In: Ekonomisk Debatt, ISSN 0345-2646, no 8, p. 5-14Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 58.
    Persson, Mats
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for International Economic Studies.
    Skult, Eva
    Lärarlönerna2014In: Ekonomisk Debatt, ISSN 0345-2646, no 4, p. 6-17Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 59.
    Stryjan, Miri
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for International Economic Studies.
    Gulesci, S.
    Madestam, Andreas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economics.
    Contractural Structure, Borrower Selection, and Hypothetical Loan Demand: Survey Evidence from Uganda2014Report (Other academic)
  • 60.
    Svedberg, Peter
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for International Economic Studies.
    Matthiessen, Lars
    Sivén, Claes-Henric
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economics.
    Bent Hansen2014In: Svenska Nationalekonomer under 400 år / [ed] Christina Jonung , Ann-Charlotte Ståhlberg, Stockholm: Dialogos Förlag, 2014Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 61.
    Svensson, Jakob
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for International Economic Studies.
    Björkman-Nyqvist, Martina
    de Walque, Damien
    Information is Power: Experimental Evidence in the Long-Run Impact of Community Based Monitoring2014Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents the results of two field experiments on

    local accountability in primary health care in Uganda. Efforts

    to stimulate beneficiary control, coupled with the provision

    of report cards on staff performance, resulted in significant

    improvements in health care delivery and health outcomes

    in both the short and the longer run. Efforts to stimulate

    beneficiary control without providing information on

    performance had no impact on quality of care or health outcomes.

    The paper shows that informed users are more likely

    to identify and challenge (mis)behavior by providers and as a

    result turn their focus to issues that they can manage locally.

  • 62.
    Svensson, Jakob
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for International Economic Studies.
    Hamilton, Alexander
    The Vicious Circle of Poverty, Poor Public Service Provision, and State Legitimacy: A View from the Ground in Sudan2014Report (Other academic)
  • 63.
    Svensson, Lars E. O.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for International Economic Studies. Stockholm School of Economics, Sweden; Centre for Economic Policy Research (CEPR), United Kingdom; National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER), USA.
    How to Weigh Unemployment Relative to Inflation in Monetary Policy?2014In: JOURNAL OF MONEY CREDIT AND BANKING, ISSN 0022-2879, Vol. 46, p. 183-188Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The monetary policy mandate for the Federal Reserve and of the Riksbank are essentially the same and boil down to stabilizing inflation around the inflation target and employment or unemployment around a long-run sustainable rate. The relative weight on stabilizing unemployment or employment versus stabilizing inflation may be close to one. A positive unemployment-gap forecast normally calls for a positive inflation-gap forecast.

  • 64.
    Svensson, Lars E. O.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for International Economic Studies. Swedish Institute for Financial Research (SIFR), Sweden.
    Inflation Targeting and Leaning against the Wind2014In: The International Journal of Central Banking, ISSN 1815-4654, E-ISSN 1815-7556, Vol. 10, no 2, p. 103-114Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Should inflation targeting involve some leaning against the wind? Sweden provides a case study, since the Riksbank has been leaning against the wind since 2010, stating concerns about risks associated with the household debt-to-income ratio. The cost of this policy in terms of low inflation and high unemployment is high. According to the Riksbank's own analysis, the policy rate effect on household indebtedness is very small, and any effect on risks associated with household debt is miniscule. Indeed, much lower inflation than expected has increased households' debt burden and, if anything, increased such risks.

  • 65.
    Svensson, Lars E.O.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for International Economic Studies. Stockholm School of Economics, Sweden.
    De senaste årens penningpolitik: 'leaning against the wind'2014In: Ekonomisk Debatt, ISSN 0345-2646, Vol. 3, p. 6-24Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 66.
    Svensson, Lars E.O.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for International Economic Studies.
    Riksbanken, måluppfyllelsen och den demokratiska kontrollen2014In: Ekonomisk Debatt, ISSN 0345-2646, no 4, p. 54-66Article in journal (Other academic)
1 - 66 of 66
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