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  • 1.
    Rasmussen, Irina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    'En avant, mes enfants!': Nations, Populations, and the Avant-Garde Body in James Joyce's 'Oxen of the Sun'2019In: Comparative Literature, ISSN 0010-4124, E-ISSN 1945-8517Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the “Oxen of the Sun” episode of Ulysses James Joyce dramatizes the evolution of English prose styles by creating a stylistic matrix for gestation. The episode’s evolutionary features are well known. In his clues for the episode, Joyce refers to recapitulation as a key structural principle and suggests that “Oxen”’s master symbol, the womb, encapsulates the synchronized processes of language and embryo growth. Apart from the centrality of the evolutionary design, however, the episode persistently achieves more, if not something else completely. This essay addresses “Oxen”’s complexity by highlighting a connection between its evolutionary form and its avant-garde tactics, a conjunction that has not been sufficiently explored. The larger argument at stake in this analysis is that the episode’s evolutionary design and its tactics of rupture work together to dislocate and reimagine the rhetoric of national conception that dominated Irish political discourse. By foregrounding how the English prose styles work as gateways to liberal discourses on statehood, national health, economy, politics, and sexuality, the essay argues that “Oxen”’s stylistic evolution reveals ways in which the body politic and the physical body are entangled through life processes. The episode’s culminating style of the modern idiom, its famous contemporary noisy English vernaculars, points to an avant-garde orientation of Joyce evolution. The “crushing” prose of these corrupted vernaculars suggests a symbolic rupture within the texture of the social and raises several questions: How far does Joyce take his literary experiment and whether he is marching in step with the artistic revolutionaries of his time or offers a trial run for something completely different? By foregrounding the episode’s radical aesthetics, its avant-garde tactics and tropes, the essay attempts to understand the rationale behind “Oxen”’s stylistic evolution and its raising of modernity’s socially disruptive forces.

  • 2.
    Han, Gül Bilge
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Bir Karakuşa Bakmanın On Üç Yolu by Wallace Stevens2018In: Wallace Stevens, Poetry, and France: "Au pays de la métaphore" / [ed] Juliette Utard, Bart Eeckhout, Lisa Goldfarb, Paris: l'École Normale Supérieure , 2018, p. 115-119Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 3.
    Kunitz, Silvia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Collaborative Attention Work on Gender Agreement in Italian as a Foreign Language2018In: The Modern language journal, ISSN 0026-7902, E-ISSN 1540-4781, Vol. 102, p. 64-81Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In cognitivist Second Language Acquisition (SLA), attention and noticing are described as psycholinguistic processes that (may) have a role in language learning. The operationalization of such constructs, however, poses methodological challenges, since neither online nor off-line measures are coextensive with these cognitive processes that occur in the individual mind-brain. In contrast with such a perspective, the present conversation-analytic study re-specifies attention in social terms, as a nexus of publicly displayed actions that are jointly achieved by college level students of Italian as a foreign language as they engage in collaborative writing while planning for a group presentation to be performed in the second language (L2). More specifically, the article describes gender-focusing sequences that are initiated by attention-mobilizing turns with which a student directs her coparticipants' attention to an oral or written item that is oriented to as possibly inaccurate in terms of gender assignment. The study shows the agentive role of students in identifying learnables and solving language-related issues and provides an example of how participants do learning as a socially situated and collaborative activity by enacting immanent pedagogies (Lindwall & Lymer, 2005).

  • 4.
    Kaufhold, Kathrin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Creating translanguaging spaces in students’ academic writing practices2018In: Linguistics and Education, ISSN 0898-5898, E-ISSN 1873-1864, Vol. 45, p. 1-9Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Postgraduates increasingly write in multilingual contexts. Studies have focused on developing bilingual expertise or harnessing expressions of writer identity. Yet, the role of students’ linguistic ideologies and their writing experiences has so far not been problematised. Based on Busch’s sociolinguistic model oflinguistic repertoire (2012), this paper investigates how students develop their academic writing across language codes and registers in the multilingual contexts of a Swedish university. The qualitative, longi-tudinal study presents data from two students including interviews based on the students’ written text relating to their master’s thesis. Findings show that students’ linguistic ideologies and their experiences can enable or restrict their capacity to draw on their varied repertoires. When enabled, students create translanguaging spaces for meaning making in collaboration with peers and institutional actors. I argue that the metaphor of translanguaging space can be fruitfully applied as a pedagogic tool.

  • 5.
    Han, Gül
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Helgesson, StefanBethlehem, Louise
    "Cultural Solidarities" Ed. special issue, Safundi: The Journal of South African and American Studies: Ed. special issue, Safundi: The Journal of South African and American Studies2018Collection (editor) (Refereed)
  • 6.
    Soler, Josep
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    El cas català des d’una perspectiva nord-europea: marcs ideològics i legislació lingüística2018In: El català, llengua mitjana d’Europa: Multilingüisme, globalització i sostenibilitat lingüística / [ed] Albert Bastardas i Boada, Emili Boix-Fuster, Rosa M. Torrens, Barcelona: Octaedro, 2018, p. 61-77Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 7.
    Kuteeva, Maria
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    European perspectives on second language writing pedagogy2018In: The TESOL Encyclopedia of English Language Teaching / [ed] John I. Liontas, John Wiley & Sons, 2018Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 8.
    Oostendorp, Marcelyn
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English. Stellenbosch University, South Africa.
    Extending resemiotisation: time, space and body in discursive representation2018In: Social Semiotics, ISSN 1035-0330, E-ISSN 1470-1219, Vol. 28, no 3, p. 297-314Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The present article offers a critical appraisal of resemiotisation through the investigation of a controversial comment made by South African president, Jacob Zuma. The comment (that Jacob Zuma took a shower to minimise his risk of contracting HIV/AIDS) was made during a rape trial in 2006. Over a period of eight years, this comment has been continually recontextualised into different modes, and has served different functions. This article investigates newspaper reports, cartoons and YouTube clips which were collected from 2006 to 2014. All of these texts refer to the Shower comment in linguistic, visual or multimodal ways. Drawing on a multimodal analysis, focussing specifically on modes of representation, the article critically discusses the notions of mode, time and space in connection to resemiotisation. I argue that a Bakhtinian account of time, space and body allows for a non-binary view of semiotic phenomena that will lead to a deeper theoretical understanding of semiotic transformations in all their complexity.

  • 9.
    Ludwigs, Marina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    From de Man to Gans: The Return of the Referent2018In: Anthropoetics, ISSN 1083-7264, E-ISSN 1083-7264, Vol. 23, no 2Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 10.
    Whiteley, Giles
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Henry Longueville Mansel's Phrontisterion (1852)2018In: Victorian literature and culture (Print), ISSN 1060-1503, E-ISSN 1470-1553, Vol. 46, no 2, p. 485-514Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Established in 1859, as a merger of the Whigs, Radicals and Peelites, the British Liberal Party and their ideological forerunners won 15 out of a total of 20 parliamentary elections between 1832–1910. Responsible for passing socially progressive legislation domestically, Victorian liberalism can lay claim to being the most significant political ideology of the period. By bringing together aspects of classical social liberalism and liberal free-market conservatism, this specifically Victorian brand of liberalism enabled Britain to take a place at the center of world affairs. Indeed, by the mid-1850s, the emergence of Victorian liberalism had begun to be seen as something of a political necessity, as demonstrated by Thomas Babington Macaulay's The History of England from the Accession of James II (1848–61), a foundational text of Whig historicism, in which Lord Charles Grey's 1832 Reform Bill was characterized as the teleological culmination of British history. But while the liberals styled themselves as progressives and their opponents as reactionaries, Whig history has tended to oversimplify the dynamics of this narrative. In this context, Henry Longueville Mansel's closet drama Phontisterion offers a fascinating glimpse into a contemporary Tory response to the seemingly irresistible rise of Victorian liberalism.

  • 11.
    Han, Gül Bilge
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Helgesson, Stefan
    Bethlehem, Louise
    Introduction: Cultural Solidarities2018In: Safundi: The Journal of South African and American Comparative Studies, ISSN 1753-3171, E-ISSN 1543-1304, no 3Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 12.
    Han, Gül Bilge
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Jacques Rancière and the Political Dimensions of Aesthetic Autonomy in Stevens' Depression-Era Poetry2018In: Wallace Stevens, Poetry, and France: "Au pays de la métaphore" / [ed] Juliette Utard, Bart Eeckhout, Lisa Goldfarb, Paris: l'École Normale Supérieure , 2018, p. 207-216Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 13.
    Soler, Josep
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Vihman, Virve-Anneli
    Language ideology and language planning in Estonian higher education: nationalising and globalising discourses2018In: Current Issues in Language Planning, ISSN 1466-4208, E-ISSN 1747-7506, Vol. 19, no 1, p. 22-41Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In recent years, interest in the study of language policy issues in the context of universities has grown considerably. One reason for this is the coexistence of two apparently contradictory discourses, centring around nationalising and globalising orientations. Universities are seen by many as the key institutions for safeguarding the sustainability of national languages, while in order to operate on a global scale, an increasing use of foreign languages (particularly English) is necessary in those same institutions. In our paper, we explore the tensions and ambiguities provoked by this scenario in the context of Estonian higher education (HE), focusing on the University of Tartu. More specifically, we look at how different stakeholders orient themselves towards the language question at the university: university officials, members of the university (staff and students), and members of society outside the university. Using discourse analytical tools, we map the ideological constructs with which these different stakeholders take a stance towards the two dominating discourses. In our analysis, we show that these different groups re-create and shape both the nationalising and the globalising discourses currently present in the field of HE by strategically mobilising a set of semiotic resources available to them.

  • 14.
    Helgesson, Stefan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    “Literature,” Theory from the South and the Case of the São Paulo School2018In: Cambridge Journal of Postcolonial Literary Inquiry, ISSN 2052-2614, Vol. 5, no 2, p. 141-157Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    With methodological support in Reinhart Koselleck’s notion of historical semantics, and an empirical focus on the Brazilian critic Antonio Candido (1918−2017), this article approaches “literature” as a layered concept that will always fail to function as that “plane of equivalence” that Aamir Mufti sees as an outcome of the Orientalist episteme. This failure is historical in the strongest sense; it derives from the condition that “history is never identical with its linguistic registration,” as Koselleck puts it. A concept will therefore, throughout its life span, always encompass a combination of persisting and new meanings. In this way, Candido and the São Paulo school of criticism that he was instrumental in forming can be read as a strong instance of “theory from the South” that exploits the malleability of the concept from within its historical situatedness and contributes thereby to the conceptual worlding of literature.

  • 15.
    Björkman, Beyza
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Morphosyntactic variation in spoken English as a lingua franca interactions: Revisiting linguistic variety2018In: Routledge Handbook of English as a Lingua Franca / [ed] Jennifer Jenkins, Will Baker, Martin Dewey, Abingdon: Routledge, 2018Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 16.
    Han, Gül Bilge
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Nazım Hikmet's Afro-Asian Solidarities2018In: Safundi: The Journal of South African and American Comparative Studies, ISSN 1753-3171, E-ISSN 1543-1304Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper explores literary-political expressions of solidarity with the rise of African decolonization struggles during the Cold-War era, by zooming in on the work of a renowned Turkish poet, Nazım Hikmet Ran. First, I argue that Hikmet’s poetry offers transnational solidarities that not only assert the political agency of anticolonial uprisings but also negate the persisting mechanisms of racial and economic oppression after colonial rule. Second, in taking into account Hikmet’s active participation in the “Afro-Asian Writers’ Bureau,” I show how his vision of solidarity reveals alternative patterns of correspondence between peripheral sites of modernism and world literature’s cross-cultural encounters within the Global South. Lastly, I argue that Hikmet’s poetry generates new models of collective agency and solidarity that are imagined both through and against the discourse of the news. His mixture of lyric and documentary components, I argue, calls for close attention to the formal aspects of his discourse of solidarity.

  • 17. O'Rourke, Bernadette
    et al.
    Soler, Josep
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Darquennes, Jeroen
    New speakers and language policy2018In: The Oxford Handbook of Language Policy and Planning / [ed] James W. Tollefson, Miguel Pérez-Milans, Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2018Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 18.
    Johannesson, Nils-Lennart
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Orrmulum and The Testaments of the Twelve Patriarchs2018In: Textual Reception and Cultural Debate in Medieval English Studies / [ed] María José Esteve Ramos, José Ramón Prado-Pérez, Newcastle upon Tyne: Cambridge Scholars Publishing, 2018, p. 155-176Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In passages copied by Jan van Vliet from the Orrmulum manuscript in 1659 Orrm claims that the twelve Patriarchs serve as examples of various virtues. Van Vliet copied no expository text, only lists of virtues and vices, from these pages, but he did supply the heading ‘De XII Patriarchis’ in his notebook (London, Lambeth Palace Library, MS. 783). Searches of the Patrologia Latina database fail to turn up a Latin text that might have been Orrm’s source for such claims.

    The Testaments of the Twelve Patriarchs, by contrast, provides a discussion of all the vices and virtues that Orrm needed to make up his lists and ascribe them to the Patriarchs. This is a pseudepigraphical Jewish text with Christian interpolations, presumably finalized in the second century A.D. The text purports to be the dying speeches of the twelve sons of Jacob to their gathered offspring, containing much moral exhortation, apocalyptic visions, and prophecies about the coming of the Messiah and his passion and resurrection (‘Testaments’ 2012). In the thirteenth century Robert Grosseteste, bishop of Lincoln, acquired a manuscript copy of the Greek text from Athens, a text which he translated into Latin in 1242 (H. J. de Jonge 1975: 100–01).

    This article will demonstrate the correspondences between the Orrmulum passages in question and the text of the Testaments of the Twelve Patriarchs, and in addition discuss the possibility for that text (or a summary of it) to have been available to Orrm long before Grosseteste made his translation. If we can trust the evidence of van Vliet’s copy in MS 783, then the reception history of The Testaments of the Twelve Patriarchs in Western Europe will have to be modified.

  • 19.
    Helgesson, Stefan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    The World-Literary formation of Antonio Candido2018In: Re-mapping World Literature: Writing, Book Markets and Epistemologies between Latin America and the Global South / [ed] Gesine Müller, Jorge J. Locane, Benjamin Loy, Berlin: Mouton de Gruyter, 2018, p. 225-236Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 20.
    Soler, Josep
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Björkman, Beyza
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Kuteeva, Maria
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    University language policies in Estonia and Sweden: Exploring the interplay between English and national languages in higher education2018In: Journal of Multilingual and Multicultural Development, ISSN 0143-4632, E-ISSN 1747-7557, Vol. 39, no 1, p. 29-43Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    As universities seek to become more international, their need to engage with a wider range of languages, particularly English, seems more prominent. At the same time, universities are also regarded by many stakeholders as key institutions to preserve a given national language and culture. This apparent tension makes universities a fruitful ground to explore relevant issues of language policymaking. This paper analyses language policies in higher education in two northern European countries, Sweden and Estonia. Applying qualitative content analytical tools, we tackle the following questions: (1) what major themes emerge from the analysis of institutional language policy documents in Estonia and Sweden? and (2) how is English perceived in relation to other languages? Our analysis shows that, despite their different historical and sociopolitical trajectories, universities in the two countries tend to adopt similar stances vis-à-vis their language policy developments. There also exist, however, different nuances in approaching the language question, which we interpret as being the result of the particular cultural backgrounds of each country.

  • 21.
    Whiteley, Giles
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    A Note on Some Unidentified Sources in Mansfield’s Reading from 19072017In: Katherine Mansfield and Russia / [ed] Galya Diment, Gerri Kimber, W Todd Martin, Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press, 2017, p. 190-193Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This chapter examines a number of unattributed quotations taken from Katherine Mansfield’s journals of 1907, documenting her previously unknown reading of the works of three popular Edwardian novelists: Anthony Hope Hawkins, Henry Seton Merriman and Horace Annesley Vachell.

  • 22.
    Helgesson, Stefan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    An Ecology of World Literature: From Antiquity to the Present Day by Alexander Beecroft2017In: Comparative literature studies (Urbana), ISSN 0010-4132, E-ISSN 1528-4212, Vol. 54, no 1, p. 234-239Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 23.
    Whiteley, Giles
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    An Oblique Allusion to Barbauld in The Mystery of Edwin Drood2017In: Dickens quarterly, ISSN 0742-5473, E-ISSN 2169-5377, Vol. 34, no 2, p. 172-175Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 24.
    Whiteley, Giles
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    An Unidentified French Quotation in Wilde’s Essay on ‘Historical Criticism’2017In: Notes and Queries, ISSN 0029-3970, E-ISSN 1471-6941, Vol. 64, no 1, p. 141-142Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 25.
    Whiteley, Giles
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    An Unnoted Quotation from Pater in Wilde’s Review of William Morris2017In: Notes and Queries, ISSN 0029-3970, E-ISSN 1471-6941, Vol. 64, no 4, p. 640-641Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 26.
    Oostendorp, Marcelyn
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English. Stellenbosch University, South Africa.
    As an undergrad, I don't have the right to an opinion': Reconstructing Students as Creative Meaning-makers in the Applied English Language Classroom2017In: RELC Journal A Journal of Language Teaching and Research in Southeast Asia, ISSN 0033-6882, E-ISSN 1745-526X, Vol. 48, no 2, p. 278-285Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The transformation of higher education has been a pressing concern for policy makers and practitioners. This article provides examples of the transformative potential of assessments designed within the framework of a multi-literacies and heteroglossic pedagogy in an Applied English Language course at a South African university. These assessments, which used multiple semiotic resources and created spaces for contesting voices, allowed students to bring their own expertise into the learning experience. This, it is argued, ultimately led to enhanced student voice and agency, two crucial components in transformative practices.

  • 27.
    Negretti, Raffaella
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English. Chalmers Technical University, Sweden.
    Calibrating Genre: Metacognitive Judgments and Rhetorical Effectiveness in Academic Writing by L2 Graduate Students2017In: Applied Linguistics, ISSN 0142-6001, E-ISSN 1477-450X, Vol. 38, no 4, p. 512-539Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Several strands of applied linguistic research have emphasized the importance of genre awareness for academic writing students. Although metacognitive behaviors have been linked to L2 writing proficiency and performance, there is still the need for an account of how and why different metacognitive behaviors can help L2 academic writers to apply genre knowledge in authentic situations. Adopting an interdisciplinary approach, this study borrows the framework of calibration from educational psychology to highlight the relationship between the accuracy of graduate students’ metacognitive judgments and the quality of their texts. Within an authentic setting, the nature of metacognitive judgments is calibrated against the assessment of rhetorical effectiveness by teacher raters using genre analysis criteria. Findings show that individual differences in rhetorical effectiveness can be better understood when accuracy of metacognitive judgments is considered along two qualitative dimensions: depth and alignment. Differential achievement relates to the ability to apply genre knowledge to the text, and misalignments in task perceptions and criteria. Implications for genre pedagogy and further research are discussed.

  • 28.
    Whiteley, Giles
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Coleridge’s Quotation from Petronius in the Notebooks of 18302017In: Notes and Queries, ISSN 0029-3970, E-ISSN 1471-6941, Vol. 64, no 4, p. 603-604Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 29.
    Tissari, Heli
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Corpus-linguistic approaches to metaphor analysis2017In: The Routledge Handbook of Metaphor and Language / [ed] Elena Semino, Zsófia Demjén, Milton Park, Abingdon, Oxon: Routledge, 2017, p. 117-130Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Corpora should be used to study metaphors for the same reasons that they should be used for any linguistic research. They help us to search through a lot of data with great speed, they make research replicable, and they give us access to statistics on linguistic phenomena. This chapter will discuss and demonstrate how best to make use of corpora in metaphor research.

  • 30.
    Whiteley, Giles
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Cosmopolitan Space: Political Topographies in ‘Lord Arthur Savile's Crime’2017In: Victoriographies, ISSN 2044-2416, Vol. 7, no 2, p. 124-142Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This essay responds to Julian Wolfreys’s suggestion that Oscar Wilde’s London is primarily psycho-geographical by seeking to read his texts within the historical and spatial context of late nineteenth-century London. Taking as a test the short story ‘Lord Arthur Saville’s Crime’, this essay deploys the critical insights of Henri Lefebvre to suggest that Wilde’s city writing engages more closely with London life than has been hitherto suggested. Following Lord Arthur on his three perambulations across the city, from Hyde Park and Piccadilly to Covent Garden, through Soho, and finally from St James’s to the Embankment, the article focuses particularly on the ways in which Wilde’s use of what might easily be assumed to be an incidental location, namely Cleopatra’s Needle, invites us to reread the text’s revolutionary politics within the context of the French Revolution. Concluding with a discussion of Wilde’s treatment of London’s ‘cosmopolitan space’, the essay shows that the way in which seemingly stock imagery deployed in Wilde’s representation of the city may in fact be read as part of a wider and complex engagement with both the politics and the aesthetics of space.

  • 31.
    Whiteley, Giles
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    ‘Dishonours of the Grave’: Jeremy Taylor and De Quincey’s Confessions2017In: Notes and Queries, ISSN 0029-3970, E-ISSN 1471-6941, Vol. 64, no 4, p. 589-592Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 32.
    Soler, Josep
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Jürna, Merike
    Doing language policy: Teasing out the tensions for trans-national scholars in Estonian and Danish higher education2017In: Language Policy Beyond the State / [ed] Maarja Siiner, Kadri Koreinik, Kara D. Brown, Cham, Switzerland: Springer, 2017, p. 45-60Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 33. Malmström, Hans
    et al.
    Mezek, Spela
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Pecorari, Diane
    Shaw, Philip
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English. Linnaeus University, Sweden.
    Irvine, Aileen
    Engaging with Terminology in the Multilingual Classroom: Teachers’ Practices for Bridging theGap Between L1 Lectures and English Reading2017In: Classroom Discourse, ISSN 1946-3014, E-ISSN 1946-3022, Vol. 8, no 1, p. 3-18Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In some academic settings where English is not the first language it is nonetheless common for reading to be assigned in English, and the expectation is often that students will acquire subject terminology incidentally in the first language as well as in English as a result of listening and reading. It is then a prerequisite that students notice and engage with terminology in both languages. To this end, teachers’ classroom practices for making students attend to and engage with terms are crucial for furthering students’ vocabulary competence in two languages. Using transcribed video recordings of eight undergraduate lectures from two universities in such a setting, this paper provides a comprehensive picture of what teachers ‘do’ with terminology during a lecture, i.e. how terms are allowed to feature in the classroom discourse. It is established, for example, that teachers nearly always employ some sort of emphatic practice when using a term in a lecture. However, the repertoire of such practices is limited. Further, teachers rarely adapt their repertoires to cater to the special needs arguably required in these settings, or to exploit the affordances of multilingual environments.

  • 34. Vanhatalo, Ulla
    et al.
    Tissari, Heli
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Esittelyssä alkusanakieli2017In: Virittäjä : Kotikielen Seuran aikakauslehti, ISSN 0042-6806, E-ISSN 2242-8828, Vol. 121, no 2Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article presents a full-length Finnish version of the Natural Semantic Metalanguage (NSM), comprising 66 primes and a list of canonical sentences. It considers the notion of primes and their identification. It presents the main principles of NSM and gives instructions and examples. It shows that the Finnish-based NSM corresponds to versions based on other languages, is translatable into them and lends itself well to semantic analysis. The article briefly presents the concepts of molecule and allolexy and gives examples of them. It also presents observations on how to conduct semantic analysis with the NSM method, concerning, among other things, the kind of words which lend themselves best to an NSM analysis, the kind of evidence an NSM analysis should be based on and the question why some NSM definitions do not fully adhere to rules. It gives examples of NSM definitions translated from English into Finnish (e.g. the verb to promise) and of NSM definitions written in Finnish (e.g. the verb nalkuttaa ‘to nag’). It also considers how to translate NSM terminology from English into Finnish, how to document the steps leading to an NSM definition and how to combine the NSM method with other methods of semantic analysis. 

  • 35.
    Han, Gül Bilge
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Schreiber, Paul
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    For him the moon was always in Scandinavia: Stevens in the Swedish University Classroom2017In: Wallace Stevens Journal, ISSN 0148-7132, E-ISSN 2160-0570, Vol. 41, no 2, p. 207-216Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 36. Hynninen, Niina
    et al.
    Kuteeva, Maria
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Good and acceptable English in L2 research writing: Ideals and realities in history and computer science2017In: Journal of English for Academic Purposes, ISSN 1475-1585, E-ISSN 1878-1497, Vol. 30, p. 53-65Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In light of the recent developments on the international publishing scene, increasingly dominated by L2 writers of English, the question of what is considered to be good and acceptable English calls for further research. This paper examines in what ways researchers describe the English used for research writing in their field. Interview data were collected from historians and computer scientists working in Finland and Sweden. Our analysis points towards some differences in the way researchers perceive good writing in English in their field, and what they themselves report to practice as (co-)authors, readers/reviewers, and proofreaders. The discrepancy between the ideals and realities of research writing in English was clear in the case of the historians. Our findings suggest that in research writing for publication, there is a pull towards some form of standard norm. This standard can be jointly negotiated during the writing, reviewing, and proofreading process. It may also develop in different directions in different disciplines, but it is likely to be based on the principles of understandability and clarity.

  • 37.
    Mahmutovic, Adnan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Halal History and Existential Meaning in Salman Rushdie’s Early Fiction2017In: Textual Layering: Contact, Historicity, Critique / [ed] Maria Margaroni, Apostolos Lampropoulos, Christakis Chatzichristou., Lanham: Lexington Books, 2017Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 38.
    Dellming, Elisabet
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Imagination, Irreality, and the Constitution of Knowledge in Penelope Fitzgerald's The Blue Flower2017In: Anthropoetics, ISSN 1083-7264, E-ISSN 1083-7264, Vol. 23, no 1Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this reading of Penelope Fitzgerald’s The Blue Flower I draw on the existential phenomenology of Maurice Natanson as well as Paul Ricoeur’s philosophy of the possible. I expand on Ricoeur’s claim that fiction may recover what history cannot account for as I make the case for imagination as a prerequisite for epistemically end ethically viable knowledge. I here use Miranda Fricker’s concept of epistemic injustice in order to show how the episteme (in Foucault’s sense) frequently deprives historical subjects of their status as “knowers,” hence refusing them their right to “be who they are” (Fricker, 5).  My reading demonstrates how The Blue Flower (in phenomenological terms) makes irreal the everyday and in doing so constitutes literature’s peculiar capacity to provide an alternate road to knowledge. I am interested in following this trajectory in terms of the fictive possibilities of the imaginary in the constitution of knowledge in literature as a cultural/linguistic space where imagination-based knowledge is constructed. I show how the irreal quality of the everyday in The Blue Flower illuminates with a sense of possibility the current of loss (of opportunity, of life, of action) underpinning the novel’s “mood.” I argue that the irreal makes for a different way of looking at loss insofar as it makes room for something else: the emergence of meaning “in spite of everything” (Kearney, 54), thus creating a scene of representation by which the sense of meaning can come into being. For this purpose, I highlight imagination rather than history, the possible rather than the actual, and ultimately, examine the epistemological significance of such an approach.

  • 39.
    Mahmutovic, Adnan
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Solnes Jonsson, Fridrik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    In orbit: Roberto Bolano2017In: American Studies in Scandinavia, ISSN 0044-8060, Vol. 49, no 1, p. 101-124Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Chilean author Roberto Bolaiio (1953-2003) has achieved considerable critical and commercial success among a global English readership. Breaking into the US market, which has an important mediating role for the international circulation of texts, is a rare feat for a non-Anglophone author and requires some explanation. This paper looks at the rise of Bolailo in terms of major theories on world literature. We find that his success fits into a combination of explanatory models (Casanova, Moretti, Thomsen), but it also reveals interesting mismatches and problematic aspects that show a need to update existing theories. Our analysis, which focuses on the treatment of Bolano in the American market, shows a great need for transnational forms of analysis across linguistic barriers.

  • 40.
    Whiteley, Giles
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Inspir’d Bards : An Unidentified Quotation in Pope’s Dunciad Variorum2017In: Notes and Queries, ISSN 0029-3970, E-ISSN 1471-6941, Vol. 64, no 3, p. 478-480Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 41.
    Kaufhold, Kathrin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Interdisciplinary postgraduate writing: Developing genre knowledge2017In: Writing & Pedagogy, ISSN 1756-5839, E-ISSN 1756-5847, Vol. 9, no 2, p. 251-274Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Humanities departments across European universities have established an increasingnumber of interdisciplinary, international master’s programmes that culminatein thesis projects. Yet, the challenges of such interdisciplinary research-based writinghave been largely neglected in EAP research. This article investigates how postgraduatestudents in interdisciplinary fields express and develop genre knowledgeduring an EAP course for Humanities students preparing for their thesis writing.In two case studies, the article qualitatively explores students’ perspectives on theirwriting along the related dimensions of disciplinary positioning and genre knowledge.Students’ explicit expressions of such knowledge in course tasks and interviewsare analysed. In addition, students’ research-based writing is compared to tracemanifestations of this knowledge. The results highlight the students’ use of individualreference points to evaluate writing within their heterogeneous research fields. Interms of their research-based writing, the cases illustrate two related trajectories,namely, the development from writer to topic focus and the combination of themesinto a coherent argument. Tracing the textual developments reveals the significanceof mapping interdisciplinary studies on the interrelated epistemological, thematicand discoursal levels in postgraduate writing. Developing an awareness of theselevels requires an understanding of the situatedness of postgraduates’ writing ininterdisciplinary, departmental and biographical contexts.

  • 42.
    Whiteley, Giles
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    “Inverted Rites”: Reading Girard reading Pater reading Shakespeare2017In: Anthropoetics, ISSN 1083-7264, E-ISSN 1083-7264, Vol. 23, no 1Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This essay traces the provenance of René Girard’s familiarity with Walter Pater’s idea of “inverted rights” in relation to Shakespeare’s Richard II. It demonstrates the likelihood that Girard likely did not have extensive first-hand knowledge of Pater’s essay “Shakespeare’s English Kings,” but learned about it from Ernst Kantorowicz’s book The King’s Two Bodies. The essay continues by argued that Girard does not give proper credit to Pater’s astute anthropological insight regarding the inherent doubleness of the originary rite of coronation, which carries within itself the shadow of the “inverted rite” of deposition.

  • 43.
    Whiteley, Giles
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Kipling the Plagiarist? The Case of ‘O Baal, Hear Us!’2017In: Notes and Queries, ISSN 0029-3970, E-ISSN 1471-6941, Vol. 64, no 1, p. 149-151Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 44.
    Mahmutovic, Adnan
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Nunes, Denise
    Maxime Miranda in Minimis: Swarm Consciousness in Hayao Miyazaki's Nausicaä of the Valley of the Wind2017In: ImageTexT: Interdisciplinary Comics Studies, ISSN 1549-6732, E-ISSN 1549-6732, Vol. 9, no 1Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 45.
    Mahmutovic, Adnan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Move to the City: Infrastructure and Globalization in How to Get Filthy Rich in Rising Asia2017In: Mosaic, ISSN 0027-1276, E-ISSN 1925-5683, Vol. 50, no 4, p. 69-84Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Looking at Mohsin Hamid's How to Get Filthy Rich in Rising Asia in terms of Saskia Sassen's The Global City, I argue that the dynamic between functionality and dysfunctionality of the infrastructure (Larkin) of postcolonial cities in global economies constitutes, in part, the city-as-oeuvre of its citizens (Lefebvre).

  • 46.
    Soler-Carbonell, Josep
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Saarinen, Taina
    Kibbermann, Kerttu
    Multilayered perspectives on language policy in higher education: Finland, Estonia, and Latvia in comparison2017In: Journal of Multilingual and Multicultural Development, ISSN 0143-4632, E-ISSN 1747-7557, Vol. 38, no 4, p. 301-314Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article analyses language policies in higher education (HE) in Finland, Estonia, and Latvia, as well as the European Union (EU). We take a multilayered approach to language policies in order to illuminate the intertwined nature of local, national, and international language policies in HE. We are particularly interested in the construction of national language(s) and the language(s) of internationalisation in our case countries. Finland, Estonia, and Latvia share common features as relatively small non-Anglophone countries in the Baltic region, while simultaneously having somewhat differing political and cultural histories. The results of our discursive analysis indicate that while the three countries have relatively different national language policies, regarding, for example, the position of the national language(s), the institutional policies are more similar in the three cases. For universities, the positioning of English as the de facto language of internationalisation turns the ideology of language choice in HE into a practical rather than political question. However, at the state level, the promotion of English runs contrary to national policies. The EU HE language policy seems to acknowledge the institutional level’s practical demands of English as de facto language of internationalisation rather than follow its own formal language policy of official languages.

  • 47.
    Whiteley, Giles
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    ‘Neither for God, Nor for His Enemies’: Wilde’s ‘Theoretikos’ and Pater’s Essay on Botticelli2017In: Notes and Queries, ISSN 0029-3970, E-ISSN 1471-6941, Vol. 64, no 4, p. 624-626Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 48.
    Soler, Josep
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Zabrodskaja, Anastassia
    New spaces of new speaker profiles: Exploring language ideologies in transnational multilingual families2017In: Language in society (London. Print), ISSN 0047-4045, E-ISSN 1469-8013, Vol. 46, no 4, p. 547-566Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article looks at Spanish-Estonian speaking families and their language ideologies in relation to language use in the family setting-how parents decide to use languages among themselves and with their children. Family members choose different languages for different purposes when they talk to one another. In our study, parents draw on their knowledge of the 'one parent-one language' strategy but also translanguage for different reasons, constructing new patterns of bilingual modes. In the article, we examine parents' attitudes towards language maintenance, transmission, and use with their children. We incorporate the lens of 'new speaker' research to analyse the empirical data collected in Tallinn households among Spanish-Estonian speaking families so as to contribute to a better understanding of family language policy, planning, and management, highlighting how macro-level sociolinguistic expectations and norms might be elaborated on the micro level in everyday social interactions.

  • 49.
    Helgesson, Stefan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Ngugi wa Thiong'o and the Conceptual Worlding of Literature2017In: Anglia. Zeitschrift für englische Philologie, ISSN 0340-5222, E-ISSN 1865-8938, Vol. 135, no 1, p. 105-121Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The central claim of this article is that the Kenyan writer Ngugi wa Thiong'o, known above all for his advocacy of African-language writing, performs in his essays a conceptual worlding of literature that serves to diversify its semantic content and thereby enable the recognition and expanded production of otherwise marginalised literatures. The logic of this conceptual worlding is read through a cosmopolitan-vernacular optic, which presupposes that Ngugi's interventions can neither be defined as ethnically particularist nor as expansively cosmopolitan. Rather, his approach 1) combines multiple literary 'ecologies', in Alex Beecroft's sense, and 2) attempts to reroute the temporality of 'literature' so that it is no longer reducible to Eurochronology. What unites these interventions is that they both draw on and attempt to recalibrate 'world literature' as a symbolic value in response to a postcolonial predicament. Three texts provide the empirical focus of the article: the department circular "On the Abolition of the English Department" that Ngugi co-authored in 1968 with Taban Lo Liyong and Henry Owuor-Anyumba; the essay "Literature and Society", first written in 1973; and "Memory, Restoration and African Renaissance", which is the third chapter in Something Torn and New from 2009.

  • 50.
    Whiteley, Giles
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Oscar Wilde’s Reading of Popular Science2017In: Notes and Queries, ISSN 0029-3970, E-ISSN 1471-6941, Vol. 64, no 1, p. 142-144Article in journal (Refereed)
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