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  • 1.
    Wang, Ying
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    A corpus-based study of composite predicates in Early Modern English dialogues2019In: Journal of Historical Pragmatics, ISSN 1566-5852, E-ISSN 1569-9854, Vol. 20, no 1, p. 20-50Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Composite predicates (CPs), that is, complex predicate structures comprising a light verb and an eventive noun (e.g., make a move or give a speech) are common in Present-day English and are particularly characteristic of spoken language. The aim of the paper is to trace language changes involving CPs from 1560 to 1760, a period in which the use of CPs has not yet received adequate scholarly attention. Specifically, the study examines the frequencies, lexical productivity and syntactic patterns of CPs in two types of Early Modern English (EModE) dialogues, drawn from Trial Proceedings and Drama Comedy sampled in A Corpus of English Dialogues 1560–1760 – a 1.2-million word computerized corpus of EModE speech-related texts. The results reveal significant differences between the two types of dialogue and shed light on the development of CPs in association with grammaticalization and lexicalization.

  • 2.
    Wang, Ying
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    A functional analysis of text-oriented formulaic expressions in written academic discourse: Multiword sequences vs. single words2019In: English for specific purposes (New York, N.Y.), ISSN 0889-4906, E-ISSN 1873-1937, Vol. 54, p. 50-61Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Text-oriented formulaic expressions (e.g., in addition to, on the other hand, nevertheless) are important in crafting reader-friendly prose and particularly frequent in academic discourse. By accommodating both multi-word expressions (MWEs) and single-word expressions (SWE5), the present study is among the first attempts to explore how the two types of expressions relate and contribute to the level of formulaicity in academic discourse. Through a manual examination of formulaic expressions in context, the present study provides important insights into the nature of formulaicity in the organisation of written academic discourse produced by mature and developing writers, with pedagogical implications for the training of novice writers in scientific fields.

  • 3.
    Whiteley, Giles
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    A Swine from Epicurus's Herd: The Culinary, Aesthetic, and Erotic in Wilde and Huysmans2019In: Modernism and Food Studies: Politics, Aesthetics and the Avant-Garde / [ed] Jessica Martell, Adam Fajardo, Philip Keel Geheber, University Press of Florida, 2019, p. 19-38Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 4.
    Kaufhold, Kathrin
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Tusting, Karin
    Academic writing2019In: The Routledge Handbook of Linguistic Ethnography / [ed] Karin Tusting, London: Routledge, 2019, p. 356-370Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This chapter reviews linguistic ethnographic research on academic writing. It outlines areas which have historically influenced this approach, including the sociology of scientific knowledge, the ethnography of communication, the US new rhetoric tradition and the academic literacies approach. It describes the methods which have been used in studying academic writing from an ethnographic perspective, explaining the difficulties associated with participant-observation of dispersed writing practices and how these can be mitigated against, particularly using text analysis and talk around text to gain a better understanding of writers’ experiences and practices. Research on student writing is described which explores how students develop discipline-specific expertise, how they draw on and repurpose resources in their academic writing, risk-taking, disciplinary expectations and the use of different technologies. Research on the writing of professional academics is then reviewed, including work on the discursive and genre practices of scholarly and disciplinary writing, and studies of academic writing in relation to the broader working conditions of academic life. Implications for practice are drawn out for teaching and transformative pedagogic approaches. Future directions identified include attention to inequalities in access to resources, managerialist approaches in universities and how digital communications technologies continue to transform academic writing.

  • 5.
    Nivesjö, Sanja
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Barends, Heidi
    Afterword: Publishing an academic edition of From Man to Man or Perhaps Only — in South Africa2019In: Journal of Commonwealth Literature, ISSN 0021-9894, E-ISSN 1741-6442Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This afterword to the written symposium “Between ‘the lights and shadows’: Reading the new edition of Olive Schreiner’s From Man to Man or Perhaps Only —” contains an interview with Sandy Shepherd, publisher at UCT Press, about Dorothy Driver’s 2015 edition of From Man to Man. Topics raised include the importance of local academic publishing in providing locally-specific knowledge, challenging knowledge distribution dominated from the global North, keeping local cultures alive, and establishing synergies between local and international research and local publishing. Difficulties with local academic publishing are addressed, such as high costs and a limited readership. The tensions between producing a thorough academic edition and appealing to a wider audience, and thus facilitating the spread of a novel important to South African cultural history, are discussed.

  • 6.
    Whiteley, Giles
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Bertrand Russell and a Couplet on Empedocles2019In: Notes and Queries, ISSN 0029-3970, E-ISSN 1471-6941, Vol. 66, no 2, p. 316-317Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 7.
    Nivesjö, Sanja
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Barends, Heidi
    Current perspectives on Olive Schreiner’s From Man to Man or Perhaps Only —2019In: Journal of Commonwealth Literature, ISSN 0021-9894, E-ISSN 1741-6442Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This interview article engages Angelo Fick, Jade Munslow Ong, and Valerie Stevens in current perspectives on Olive Schreiner’s novel From Man to Man, published in a new edition by Dorothy Driver and UCT Press in 2015. These interviews point towards a renewed interest in Schreiner and From Man to Man. They highlight how Schreiner scholarship is heading in fresh directions, as current thought on From Man to Man, and Driver’s edition, spark interest in ecocriticism, animal studies, intersectionality, alternative takes on race, intimacy, and relations in her work, and the broader role of white writers in discussions of decolonization.

  • 8. Pecorari, Diane
    et al.
    Shaw, Philip
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Malmström, Hans
    Developing a new academic vocabulary test2019In: Journal of English for Academic Purposes, ISSN 1475-1585, E-ISSN 1878-1497, Vol. 39, p. 59-71Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Despite the central role of vocabulary in language learning, and the increasing interest in academic vocabulary, materials for testing academic vocabulary are not common. This paper reports on the development of a new test of academic vocabulary. Test items were based on a relatively recently developed list of academic vocabulary. They were then piloted, refined, and two comparable forms of the test were produced. The paper describes the approaches used to assess the validity and equivalence of the two forms of the test. Research and pedagogical implications and uses of the test are discussed. 

  • 9.
    Tissari, Heli
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Douglas Biber & Bethany Gray (2016) Grammatical Complexity in Academic English, 2016. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press2019In: Folia linguistica, ISSN 0165-4004, E-ISSN 1614-7308, Vol. 53, no 1, p. 293-296Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 10.
    Rasmussen, Irina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    'En avant, mes enfants!' Nations, Populations, and the Avant-Garde Body in James Joyce's 'Oxen of the Sun'2019In: Comparative Literature, ISSN 0010-4124, E-ISSN 1945-8517, Vol. 71, no 4, p. 408-435Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the “Oxen of the Sun” episode of Ulysses, James Joyce dramatizes the evolution of English prose styles by creating a stylistic matrix for gestation. This article links the episode’s stylistic evolution to the historical development of liberal thought about autonomy and self-determination, reading Joyce’s styles as rhetorical gateways to liberal discourses on statehood, politics, socioeconomics, national health, and sexuality. In the immediate historical context of national agitation in Ireland, the episode’s bodily tropes of reproduction, birth, emergence, and break dislocate the rhetoric of national conception, providing a critical insight into the development of liberal thought, particularly into the contradictory blend of progressive and regressive thinking from which liberal notions of autonomy and self-determination have emerged. By demonstrating how the stylistic evolution in “Oxen” moves through a series of breaks, the article relates Joyce’s disruptive tactics to the aesthetic practices of the historical avant-gardes, showing how the affinities with the avant-garde in “Oxen” work on the level of form, content, and imagined life praxis. The main argument at stake is understanding how Joyce creates a literary position of being in advance by way of engaging critically with biopolitics and the liberal discourses on national and social advancement.

  • 11.
    Fuster, Carles
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Neuser, Hannah
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Exploring intentionality in lexical transfer2019In: International Journal of Multilingualism, ISSN 1479-0718, E-ISSN 1747-7530Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Traditionally, transfer is described as interference and consequently as an unintentional mechanism. More recently, however, the perception of control in transfer has changed and it is now commonly accepted that transfer can occur both automatically and strategically. Studies have previously employed think-aloud protocols during writing tasks to establish the degree of intentionality in transfer. However, this method does not let us distinguish between instances of transfer that are truly unintentional and instances that were simply not commented on due to the constraints imposed by the think-aloud protocol. The present study, therefore, conducted a stimulated recall interview in direct succession of the think-aloud protocol in order to categorise also those instances of transfer that were not commented on initially. With data from highly multilingual adult learners of Catalan, the study examines the proportion of unintentional and intentional transfer in relation to (1) different types of transfer, (2) different source languages of transfer and (3) different word classes in transfer. The data indicates that some of these aspects of transfer tend to occur unintentionally, whereas others are more prone to be used intentionally. The theoretical implications of the results, as well as their limitations, are discussed.

  • 12.
    Tissari, Heli
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Vanhatalo, Ulla
    Siiroinen, Mari
    From corpus-assisted to corpus-driven NSM explications: The case of Finnish viha (anger, hate)2019In: Lege Artis: Language yesterday, today, tomorrow, E-ISSN 2453-8035, Vol. 4, no 1, p. 290-334Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    NSM researchers have not used corpus data very systematically thus far. One could talk about corpus-assisted rather than corpus-based or corpus-driven research. This article suggests a way to not only base research on corpus data, but also to let it guide us in defining words in terms of NSM. It presents a new method, which we have developed. Our data come from the Suomi24 Sentences Corpus and concerns the Finnish emotion words viha ('anger, hate'), vihata ('to hate') and vihainen ('angry').

  • 13.
    Whiteley, Giles
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Ian Small (ed.), The Complete Works of Oscar Wilde Volume VIII: The Short Fiction2019In: Notes and Queries, ISSN 0029-3970, E-ISSN 1471-6941, Vol. 66, no 1, p. 154-155Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 14.
    Gentens, Caroline
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English. University of Leuven, Belgium.
    Sansiñena, María Sol
    Spronck, Stef
    Van linden, An
    Irregular perspective shifts and perspective persistence, discourse-oriented and theoretical approaches: Introduction2019In: Pragmatics: Quarterly Publication of the International Pragmatics Association, ISSN 1018-2101, E-ISSN 2406-4238, Vol. 29, no 2, p. 155-169Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this introduction, we set out the central themes of the special issue. It concentrates on imperfect function-form mappings, and discusses several cases in which specific perspectival meanings are not fully predictable on the basis of a perspectivizing grammatical construction alone. We distinguish two kinds of form-function mismatches: (1) perspective-persistent phenomena, i.e. grammatically signaled deictic and/or cognitive perspective shifts which are not realized in interpretation, and (2) irregular perspective shifts, which involve either grammatically un(der)specified shifts or grammatically signaled shifts that are interpreted as mixing multiple sources of deictic and/or cognitive perspective (‘multiple-perspective constructions’). We briefly discuss and contextualize each of the contributions, and highlight their central findings.

  • 15.
    Gentens, Caroline
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English. University of Leuven, Belgium.
    Sansiñena, María SolSpronck, StefVan linden, An
    Irregular perspective shifts and perspective persistence, discourse-oriented and theoretical approaches: Special Issue2019Collection (editor) (Refereed)
  • 16.
    Wrethed, Joakim
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    John Banville and Hugo von Hofmannsthal: Language, mundane revelation and profane sacrality2019In: John Banville and His Precursors / [ed] Pietra Palazzolo, Michael Springer, Stephen Butler, Bloomsbury Academic, 2019, p. 146-162Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 17.
    Wrethed, Joakim
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    John Williams's Stoner and Literature as Dark Matter in the Age of Educational Managerialism2019In: Hungarian Journal of English and American Studies, ISSN 1218-7364, Vol. 25, no 1, p. 151-160Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The tension between Bildung and more utility-oriented dimensions of education is nothing new. For instance, Friedrich Nietzsche addressed the issue in a series of lectures presented at the Basel city museum in 1872. The German philosopher particularly despised 19th century tendencies to let education be controlled by external forces. The contemporary literature teacher may feel inclined to endorse some of Nietzsche’s sentiments. What is allowed to remain of the subject of literature in the age of massification, learnification, and criterion referenced teaching in secondary and tertiary education? Through an analysis of certain aspects of John Williams’ Stoner, the paper considers a few central questions: Why is the devoted literature teacher forced into a hypocritical position, pretending to do a set of stated things (learning outcomes), while actually doing (or wanting to do) something completely different? Is it not precisely what cannot be put into words that is the actual driving force of the study of literature? The paper suggests that this Gordian knot cannot be untied and that it should not be cut, but also that the attempts to untie the knot are in themselves vitalising forces that ought not to be neglected within literary studies and teaching.

  • 18.
    Soler, Josep
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Darquennes, Jeroen
    Language policy and ‘new speakers’: an introduction to the thematic issue2019In: Language Policy, ISSN 1568-4555, E-ISSN 1573-1863, Vol. 18, no 4, p. 467-473Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In recent years, sociolinguistic research on minority languages in Europe, particularly in the Galician context, has chiefly contributed both theoretically and empirically to the growing attention given to ‘new speakers’, as well as to the emergence of a European research network in 2013 entitled ‘New Speakers in a multilingual Europe: Opportunities and challenges’ (www.nspk.org.uk). As documented in special issues and edited volumes, the research activities in the network not only aimed at adding the term ‘new speaker’ to the growing pool of analytical terminology in critically oriented sociolinguistics. Employing ‘new speaker’ as a lens rather than as a clear-cut notion is what we—as editors—had in mind when giving shape to this volume, drawing on discussions during the final phases of the above-mentioned research network. This seemed especially useful because such a broad take on ‘new speakerness’ opens up avenues for comparative research under a common label. In sum, it is certainly worth the effort to continue delving deeper into the notion of ‘new speakers’, and particularly to do that from the perspective of language policy. The articles collected in this thematic issue aim at contributing into that direction.

  • 19.
    Soler, Josep
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Language policy and the internationalization of universities: A focus on Estonian higher education2019Book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Many universities around the world are actively engaged in the process of the internationalization of their higher education systems, trying to become more competitive in all possible respects, especially in the areas of research and teaching. Language, naturally, plays a central role in this process, but this is not always explicitly recognized as such. As a result, key sociolinguistic challenges emerge for both individuals and groups of people. Most prominently, the question of whether English constitutes an opportunity or a threat to other national languages in academic domains is a controversial one and remains unresolved. The analysis featured in this book aims at addressing this question by looking at language policy developments in the context of Estonian higher education. Adopting a discourse approach, the book emphasises the centrality of language not only as a site of struggle, but as a tool and a resource that agents in a give field utilize to orient themselves in certain positions. The book will be of interest to language policy scholars, linguistic anthropologists, and critical sociolinguists. Education scholars interested in discourse studies will also find it useful.

  • 20. Eeckhout, Bart
    et al.
    Utard, Juliette
    Altieri, Charles
    Bacigalupo, Massimo
    Goldfarb, Lisa
    Han, Gül Bilge
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    MacLeod, Glen
    Malkin, Rachel
    McLane, Maureen N.
    Ragg, Edward
    Sharpe, Tony
    Late Poems: One of the Inhabitants of the West and Nuns Painting Water-Lilies2019In: Wallace Stevens Journal, ISSN 0148-7132, E-ISSN 2160-0570, Vol. 43, no 1, p. 112-126Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 21.
    Elmgren, Charlotta
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Let us keep going and see what comes up: The Poetics of Study in J. M. Coetzee's The Childhood of Jesus2019In: Ariel: A Review of International English Literature, ISSN 0004-1327, Vol. 50, no 2-3, p. 163-190Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article argues that J. M. Coetzee's The Childhood of Jesus embodies a poetics of study. Noting Coetzee's sustained interest in educational thought, the article places Coetzee's enigmatic novel in dialogue with Giorgio Agamben's idea of study, which brings together the latter's foundational thinking on infancy, impotentiality (Agamben's term for the distinctly human capacity to withhold a certain potential), and the messianic. It shows how The Childhood of Jesus prompts its readers towards the experimentative pursuit of infinite possibilities for thought in the present moment, inviting a different mode of reading than the future-directed Derridean/Levinasian ethics of hospitality through which Coetzee's work is often read. In showing how Coetzee's late work resonates with Agamben's thought rather than Derrida's, the article highlights the emergence in Coetzee's fiction of a view of learning (and, analogously, of reading) that is characterized by irresponsibility and the idea of study with no presupposed end in sight-a dynamic that is quite distinct from an ethics of reading guided by responsibility towards a presupposed other to come.

  • 22.
    Soler, Josep
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Wang, Ying
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Linguistic differences between well-established and predatory journals: a keyword analysis of two journals in political science2019In: Learned Publishing, ISSN 0953-1513, E-ISSN 1741-4857, Vol. 32, no 3, p. 259-269Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Predatory publishing has become a much-discussed and highly visible phenomenon over the past few years. One widespread, but hardly tested, assumption is the idea that articles published in predatory journals deviate substantially from those published in traditional journals. In this paper, we address this assumption by utilizing corpus linguistic tools. We compare the 'academic-like' nature of articles from two different journals in political science, one top-ranking and one alleged predatory. Our findings indicate that there is significant linguistic variation between the two corpora along the dimensions that we test. The articles display notable differences in the types and usage of keywords in the two journals. We conclude that articles published in so-called predatory journals do not conform to linguistic norms used in higher-quality journals. These findings may demonstrate a lack of quality control in predatory journals but may also indicate a lack of awareness and use of such linguistic norms by their authors. We also suggest that there is a need for the education of authors in science writing as this may enable them to publish in higher-ranked and quality-assured outlets.

  • 23. Darquennes, Jeroen
    et al.
    Soler, Josep
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    ‘New speakers’ and language policy research: thematic and theoretical contributions to the field2019In: Language Policy, ISSN 1568-4555, E-ISSN 1573-1863, Vol. 18, no 4, p. 475-491Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this article, we reflect on the extent to which ‘new speaker’ research feeds into recent theoretical discussions in language policy scholarship, especially in connection to the discursive and ethnographically oriented perspectives which of late have become increasingly prominent. We begin with a brief overview of the ‘new speaker’ concept, its theoretical and empirical origins, and then we situate the discussions on ‘new speakers’ against the background of traditional language policy research. Thereafter the bulk of the article is dedicated to developing two main arguments: first, we provide an overview of the language policy themes that are already present in ‘new speaker’ research; and secondly, we elaborate on how ‘new speaker’ studies can contribute to current discussions in the field of language policy. We conclude with a short overview of future research directions that, in our view, can strengthen the link and the mutual benefits of the connection between ‘new speaker’ and language policy scholarship.

  • 24.
    Soler, Josep
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Roberts, Tim
    Parents’ and grandparents’ views on home language regimes: Language ideologies and trajectories of two multilingual families in Sweden2019In: Critical inquiry In Language Studies, ISSN 1542-7587, E-ISSN 1542-7595, Vol. 16, no 4, p. 249-270Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The authors investigate the sociolinguistic dynamics in multilingual families from the point of view of speakers’ linguistic trajectories, ideologies, and repertoires. Drawing on interview data from intermarried couples of different generational and linguistic profiles of two families in Sweden, the authors examine how speakers’ lived experience with different languages shapes their stance toward bi- and multilingualism and how that particular stance in turn produces a series of effects and helps constructing specific language ideological frameworks from where speakers in that given context operate. From our analysis, it appears that an ideology of the native speaker as the legitimate and authoritative type of speaker is strongly present; the native speaker is in turn the one responsible for transmitting his or her language to the children. This is problematized by the reported language mixing that occurs in the home environment and the resulting nonobservance of the one person–one language strategy. More important than that, we argue that speakers’ ideological viewpoint in a social environment takes place dialogically and discursively. This has important consequences individually, for the speakers involved in that context, and collectively, for the type of framework that emerges.

  • 25. Eeckhout, Bart
    et al.
    McLane, Maureen N.
    Altieri, Charles
    Bacigalupo, Massimo
    Goldfarb, Lisa
    Han, Gül Bilge
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    MacLeod, Glen
    Malkin, Rachel
    Ragg, Edward
    Sharpe, Tony
    Slatkin, Laura
    Utard, Juliette
    Poems from Harmonium: Floral Decorations for Bananas and The Revolutionists Stop for Orangeade2019In: Wallace Stevens Journal, ISSN 0148-7132, E-ISSN 2160-0570, Vol. 43, no 1, p. 8-28Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 26. Goldfarb, Lisa
    et al.
    Sharpe, Tony
    Altieri, Charles
    Bacigalupo, Massimo
    Eeckhout, Bart
    Han, Gül Bilge
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    MacLeod, Glen
    Malkin, Rachel
    McLane, Maureen N.
    Ragg, Edward
    Utard, Juliette
    Poems from Ideas of Order: Lions in Sweden, Botanist on Alp (No. 1), and Botanist on Alp (No. 2)2019In: Wallace Stevens Journal, ISSN 0148-7132, E-ISSN 2160-0570, Vol. 43, no 1, p. 29-50Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 27.
    Han, Gül Bilge
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    MacLeod, Glen
    Altieri, Charles
    Bacigalupo, Massimo
    Eeckhout, Bart
    Goldfarb, Lisa
    Malkin, Rachel
    McLane, Maureen N.
    Ragg, Edward
    Sharpe, Tony
    Utard, Juliette
    Poems from Parts of a World: Parochial Theme and Country Words2019In: Wallace Stevens Journal, ISSN 0148-7132, E-ISSN 2160-0570, Vol. 43, no 1, p. 51-69Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 28. Altieri, Charles
    et al.
    Ragg, Edward
    Bacigalupo, Massimo
    Eeckhout, Bart
    Goldfarb, Lisa
    Han, Gül Bilge
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    MacLeod, Glen
    Malkin, Rachel
    McLane, Maureen N.
    Sharpe, Tony
    Utard, Juliette
    Poems from The Auroras of Autumn: The Novel, Study of Images I, and Study of Images II2019In: Wallace Stevens Journal, ISSN 0148-7132, E-ISSN 2160-0570, Vol. 43, no 1, p. 92-111Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 29. Bacigalupo, Massimo
    et al.
    Malkin, Rachel
    Altieri, Charles
    Eeckhout, Bart
    Goldfarb, Lisa
    Han, Gül Bilge
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Jean, Daniel
    MacLeod, Glen
    McLane, Maureen N.
    Ragg, Edward
    Sharpe, Tony
    Utard, Juliette
    Poems from Transport to Summer: Two Tales of Liadoff and Analysis of a Theme2019In: Wallace Stevens Journal, ISSN 0148-7132, E-ISSN 2160-0570, Vol. 43, no 1, p. 70-91Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 30.
    Soler, Josep
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Marten, Heiko F.
    Resistance and adaptation to newspeakerness in educational institutions: two tales from Estonia2019In: Language Policy, ISSN 1568-4555, E-ISSN 1573-1863, Vol. 18, no 4, p. 553-572Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The term ‘new speaker’ has recently emerged as an attempt by sociolinguists not only to understand the different types of speaker profiles that can be found in contemporary societies, but also to grasp the underlying processes of becoming a legitimate speaker in a given society. In this article, we combine the results from two studies situated in two educational institutions in Estonia in order to find out about speakers’ language attitudes and experiences in connection to learning and using Estonian. We concentrate on members of the international community who have relatively recently arrived to the country. Our results indicate that these speakers fluctuate between two prototypical discourses, which we broadly dub as ‘resistance’ and ‘adaptation’ to newspeakerness. Our study thereby adds to current debates on ‘new speaker’ and language policy issues by illustrating how tensions around language legitimacy are played out on the ground in a small nation state such as Estonia.

  • 31.
    Kuteeva, Maria
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Revisiting the 'E' in EMI: students' perceptions of standard English, lingua franca and translingual practices2019In: International Journal of Bilingual Education and Bilingualism, ISSN 1367-0050, E-ISSN 1747-7522Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Conceptualizations of English as standard, as a lingua franca, or as part of translingual practice form part of the discourses surrounding its use in EMI. While researchers generally agree that the 'E' in EMI should not stand for native varieties of standard English, the stakeholders' perceptions of English call for further research. This paper addresses this gap by examining students' conceptualizations of English in an EMI programme at a Swedish university. Drawing on interview data collected from local and international students, the analysis focuses on students' conceptualizations of English in connection to their positionings. The analysis shows that all three above-mentioned conceptualizations are present. The tensions in the students' conceptualizations of English and positionings point towards issues related to power relations, group dynamics, social integration, and learning. The analysis shows that translingual practices in EMI contexts are not always associated with empowering the students by allowing them to resort to their L1s to fill gaps in their English. Translanguaging can also function as a mechanism of exclusion and reinforcement of language standards by a group of 'elite' translinguals. The idea of what is acceptable English in EMI is not static and can move along the standard - non-standard continuum.

  • 32.
    Kaufhold, Kathrin
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    McGrath, Lisa
    Revisiting the role of ‘discipline’ in writing for publication in two social sciences2019In: Journal of English for Academic Purposes, ISSN 1475-1585, E-ISSN 1878-1497, Vol. 40, p. 115-128Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The role of discipline in shaping writing for publication has been widely acknowledged in EAP research, and a wealth of studies that seek to characterise and differentiate disciplinary writing have been published. However, a conceptualisation of disciplines as clearly demarcated territories may be outdated given the “constantly changing and dynamic […] contemporary university” (Manathunga & Brew, 2014, p.45). In light of these changes, our article interrogates the centrality of discipline in research-based writing, from the academics' perspective. To do so, we adopt Trowler (2014a) reconceptualization of discipline as an analytical framework. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with seven scholars in two social sciences. Interview data was supplemented by an analysis of the participants' research-based outputs. The results highlight the contested nature of disciplinary affiliation and reveal the range of factors that participants perceive to be “shapers” of writing for publication, beyond discipline: epistemological/methodological, structural and individual. Based on the results, we argue that Trowler's new metaphor of discipline enables us to account for our findings, and conclude with recommendations for EAP writing for publication interventions.

  • 33.
    Andersson, Marta
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Subjectivity of English connectives: A corpus and experimental investigation of forwaard causality signals in written language2019In: Empirical Studies of the Construction of Discourse / [ed] Óscar Loureda, Inés Recio Fernández, Laura Nadal and Adriana Cruz., John Benjamins Publishing Company, 2019, p. 299-317Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The current study sets out to investigate naturally produced English causal relations from the point of view of conceptual and linguistic features that contribute to their intended interpretations as Volitional or Non-volitional result. These features include two discourse connectives: 'as a result' and 'for this reason', and the extent of the overlap between the semantic information they encode and the relation type they mark.The paper reports on a mixed-method approach combining a corpus investigation of result relations in the British National Corpus (BNC) and two opinion-asking experiments conducted via the crowdsourcing marketplace – AmazonMechanical Turk (AMT). The findings demonstrate that despite their functional flexibility across different causal categories, English resultative connectives showsignificant tendencies to mark specific coherence relations. The converging methodology proves that expert linguistic intuitions are shared by ordinary language users and their notion of differences between causal event types.

  • 34.
    Soler, Josep
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    The multilingual landscape of higher education in the Baltic states: Exploring language policies and practices in the university space2019In: Multilingualism in the Baltic States: Societal discourses and contact phenomena / [ed] Sanita Lazdina, Heiko F. Marten, Palgrave Macmillan, 2019, p. 443-477Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In recent years there has been increasing debate about the role and status of different languages in the domain of higher education, with an emphasis on how a multilingual balance can be reached at that level. Language and education issues in the Baltic states have been controversial topics for quite some time. Nevertheless, to date not much attention has been paid here to analysing the sociolinguistic situation at universities. This chapter proposes an analysis of the discourses circulating in the university space in the Baltic states. Methodologically, the chapter draws on ‘nexus analysis’. The results show that the three universities examined (the University of Tartu (UT), the University of Latvia (UL) in Riga and Vilnius University (VU)) follow state official monolingualism to some extent, especially in their material space. However, there are also other spaces where other languages can be more actively incorporated. The implications of the current situation are discussed at the end of the chapter, along with a brief discussion on its effects for actual speakers.

  • 35.
    Soler, Josep
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Cooper, Andrew
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Unexpected emails to submit your work: Spam or legitimate offers? The implications for novice English L2 writers2019In: Publications, E-ISSN 2304-6775, Vol. 7, no 1, article id 7Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article analyzes the discourse of what have been termed ‘predatory publishers’, with a corpus of emails sent to scholars by hitherto unknown publishers. Equipped with sociolinguistic and discourse analytic tools, we argue that the interpretation of these texts as spam or as legitimate messages may not be as straightforward an operation as one may initially believe. We suggest that English L2 scholars might potentially be more affected by publishers who engage in these email practices in several ways, which we identify and discuss. However, we argue that examining academic inequalities in scholarly publishing based exclusively on the native/non-native English speaker divide might not be sufficient, nor may it be enough to simply raise awareness about such publishers. Instead, we argue in favor of a more sociologically informed analysis of academic publishing, something that we see as a necessary first step if we wish to enhance more democratic means of access to key resources in publishing.

  • 36.
    Ullén, Magnus
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Unfinished Work: Lincoln, Hawthorne, and the Situation of Literature2019In: College literature (Print), ISSN 0093-3139, E-ISSN 1542-4286, Vol. 46, no 4, p. 860-887Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Taking issue with recent "post-critical" attempts to valorize the aesthetic aspects of literature, the present article suggests that Lloyd Bitzer's concept of the rhetorical situation is a more productive means to approach the question of the ideological and aesthetic dimensions of literature. Through readings of Abraham Lincoln's Gettysburg Address and Nathaniel Hawthorne's prefatory remarks to Our Old Home, it suggests how the concept of the rhetorical situation may help us bring out the interdependence of the rhetorical and the aesthetic dimensions of the texts in question. Rather than think of text and context as distinct, we had better think of them as joint aspects of a literary situation comprising both. Both texts deal explicitly with the Civil War, but while Lincoln's address turns the conflict into a model for future-directed hope, Hawthorne's remarks turn the war into a problem of the past that refuses to go away.

  • 37.
    Tissari, Heli
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Zhengdao Ye (ed., 2017): The semantics of nouns. Oxford: Oxford University Press. (Substantiivien moniulotteisista merkityksistä [On the multifaceted meanings of nouns].)2019In: Virittäjä : Kotikielen Seuran aikakauslehti, ISSN 0042-6806, E-ISSN 2242-8828, Vol. 123, no 2, p. 298-302Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 38.
    Whiteley, Giles
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Arthur Symons, Selected Early Poems, ed. Jane Desmarais and Chris Baldick; Arthur Symons, Spiritual Adventures, ed. Nicholas Freeman2018In: Notes and Queries, ISSN 0029-3970, E-ISSN 1471-6941, Vol. 65, no 3, p. 459-461Article, book review (Refereed)
  • 39.
    Han, Gül Bilge
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Bir Karakuşa Bakmanın On Üç Yolu by Wallace Stevens2018In: Wallace Stevens, Poetry, and France: "Au pays de la métaphore" / [ed] Juliette Utard, Bart Eeckhout, Lisa Goldfarb, Paris: l'École Normale Supérieure , 2018, p. 115-119Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 40.
    Beckman, Frida
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Cartographies of ambivalence: allegory and cognitive mapping in Don DeLillo's later novels2018In: Textual Practice, ISSN 0950-236X, E-ISSN 1470-1308, Vol. 32, no 8, p. 1383-1403Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Along with questions of how our geopolitical realities have developed over past decades come questions of how to grasp the logic of a globalized world that seems to have grown both smaller and larger at the same time. Central to current discussions are the roles of cognitive mapping and allegory. Fredric Jameson's long-standing project on these matters has recently been criticized for affirming rather than challenging the all-encompassing tendencies of contemporary capitalism. Whether we agree or not, such concerns indicate that it is time to revisit Jameson's project in the light of recent political developments. This article analyses three of Don DeLillo's later novels whose recurring preoccupation with the possibility of literary writing to intervene in an increasingly all-encompassing economic and political logic serves well to interrogate further the relation between the intensification of capitalism and cognitive mapping as a literary and political strategy. Cosmopolis (2003), Falling Man (2007), and Point Omega (2010), it will be argued, offer three different ways into thinking about the challenges to projects of cognitive mapping today.

  • 41.
    Mahmutović, Adnan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Chronotope in Moore and Gibbons’ Watchmen2018In: Studies in the novel, ISSN 0039-3827, E-ISSN 1934-1512, Vol. 50, no 2, p. 255-276Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 42.
    Kunitz, Silvia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Collaborative attention work on gender agreement in Italian as a foreign language2018In: The Modern language journal, ISSN 0026-7902, E-ISSN 1540-4781, Vol. 102, no S1, p. 64-81Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In cognitivist Second Language Acquisition (SLA), attention and noticing are described as psycholinguistic processes that (may) have a role in language learning. The operationalization of such constructs, however, poses methodological challenges, since neither online nor off‐line measures are coextensive with these cognitive processes that occur in the individual mind–brain. In contrast with such a perspective, the present conversation‐analytic study re‐specifies attention in social terms, as a nexus of publicly displayed actions that are jointly achieved by college level students of Italian as a foreign language as they engage in collaborative writing while planning for a group presentation to be performed in the second language (L2). More specifically, the article describes gender‐focusing sequences that are initiated by attention‐mobilizing turns with which a student directs her coparticipants’ attention to an oral or written item that is oriented to as possibly inaccurate in terms of gender assignment. The study shows the agentive role of students in identifying learnables and solving language‐related issues and provides an example of how participants do learning as a socially situated and collaborative activity by enacting immanent pedagogies (Lindwall & Lymer, 2005).

  • 43.
    Kaufhold, Kathrin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Creating translanguaging spaces in students’ academic writing practices2018In: Linguistics and Education, ISSN 0898-5898, E-ISSN 1873-1864, Vol. 45, p. 1-9Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Postgraduates increasingly write in multilingual contexts. Studies have focused on developing bilingual expertise or harnessing expressions of writer identity. Yet, the role of students’ linguistic ideologies and their writing experiences has so far not been problematised. Based on Busch’s sociolinguistic model oflinguistic repertoire (2012), this paper investigates how students develop their academic writing across language codes and registers in the multilingual contexts of a Swedish university. The qualitative, longi-tudinal study presents data from two students including interviews based on the students’ written text relating to their master’s thesis. Findings show that students’ linguistic ideologies and their experiences can enable or restrict their capacity to draw on their varied repertoires. When enabled, students create translanguaging spaces for meaning making in collaboration with peers and institutional actors. I argue that the metaphor of translanguaging space can be fruitfully applied as a pedagogic tool.

  • 44.
    Helgesson, Stefan
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Bethlehem, Louise
    Han, Gül Bilge
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Cultural solidarities: apartheid and the anticolonial commons of world literature2018In: Safundi: The Journal of South African and American Comparative Studies, ISSN 1753-3171, E-ISSN 1543-1304, Vol. 19, no 3, p. 260-268Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This special issue considers networked cultural responses loosely figured as “cultural solidarities” in the Global South, on the understanding that mid-twentieth century struggles to end colonialism were addressed within a transnational domain. It takes apartheid South Africa as its point of departure, positioning literature from South Africa within a broadly anti-colonial commons. As they consider works by Alex La Guma, Nazim Hikmet Ran, Athol Fugard, and Todd Matshikiza, among others, our contributors—Christopher J. Lee, Gül Bilge Han, Ashleigh Harris and Andrea Thorpe—question the role of aesthetic forms in constructing long-distance solidarities in a Cold War setting. Mohammad Shabangu’s assertion of the necessity of “opacity” as a counter to the recuperation of the African writer brings such questions into the present, intersecting contemporary debates on world literature. Finally, solidarity is framed in temporal rather than geographical terms in Andrew van der Vlies and Julia Willén’s dialogue on “reading for hope” in the aftermath of failed revolutionary projects.

  • 45.
    Whiteley, Giles
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Dickens and Southey: The Mystery of Edwin Drood and The Curse of Kehama2018In: Dickens quarterly, ISSN 0742-5473, E-ISSN 2169-5377, Vol. 35, no 3, p. 262-266Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 46.
    Kuteeva, Maria
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Mauranen, Anna
    Digital academic discourse: Texts and contexts2018In: Discourse, Context & Media, ISSN 2211-6958, E-ISSN 2211-6966, Vol. 24, p. 1-7Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This Special Issue focuses on how digital media – blogs, tweets, and other digital platforms – are used by researchers, and how these new modes of academic communication have impacted writing practices and language uses in the academy. It brings together research in two related areas of scholarship: academic discourse analysis and literacies research. In this introductory article, we first outline the concept of digital academic discourse as we perceive it in the context of our Special Issue and show how it is related to, and at the same time different from, its “analogue” predecessor. We then continue to discuss the practices surrounding the production of academic texts with the support of digital media, followed by an outline of how both digital academic discourse and related writing practices are tied to the networks, communities and spaces in which they take place. Next, methodological issues in the study of digital academic discourse are considered, and the articles in this special issue are presented in connection to the themes outlined above. We conclude by contextualising the studies reported here within current trends in discourse analytical and sociolinguistic research and identify venues for future studies.

  • 47.
    Irina, Rasmussen
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Documentary Modernism: Worldly Sympathies, Ideal Collectivities and Dissenting Individualism2018In: World Literatures: Exploring the Cosmopolitan-Vernacular Exchange / [ed] Stefan Helgesson, Annika Mörte Alling, Yvonne Lindqvist, Helena Wulff, Stockholm: Stockholm University Press, 2018, p. 185-198Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This chapter approaches the nexus of cosmopolitanism and nationalism as it is actualised in a range of aesthetic documentary projects from the 1920s and 30s. It argues that a range of varied documentary modernist projects implement cosmopolitan practices of collection, assemblage and reportage in order to remap the world in formations conductive to universal social justice. It shows, firstly, how the modernist production of cosmopolitan value in aestheticized documentary cultural forms energises the sociopolitical imaginary of the period and, secondly, how aesthetic modernisms’ response to the cosmopolitics of the interwar period anticipates contemporary debates in the early 21st century about globalisation and world literature.

  • 48.
    Ekelund, Bo G.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Dots on the Literary Map?: Literary Valorizations of Place, the Wealth of Earl Lovelace's Trinidad, and Geometric Data Analysis2018In: Ariel: A Review of International English Literature, ISSN 0004-1327, Vol. 49, no 2-3, p. 1-36Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article intervenes in scholarly debates about postcolonial space by demonstrating the distinctive strengths of Geometric Data Analysis (GDA) as an approach to literary space that skirts both close and distant reading modes. I use GDA to map the fictional space of Trinidadian author Earl Lovelace's short story A Brief Conversion, offering a more complete and systematic account than earlier readings. I argue that the theoretical stakes of this sort of analysis reside in the distinction between what I call the wealth of place and the value of place, terms inspired by Marxist value critique. Despite its best intentions, literary criticism tends to get caught up in the logic of valorization, putting into circulation place as a value, dissociated from the wealth of place that the literary work (in the best of cases) produces. From these theoretical starting points, I assert that geometric methods can stay truer to the wealth of place by disclosing the space of possibles created by the literary text, thus restoring to the storyworld a sense of its dynamic and open orientations.

  • 49.
    Soler, Josep
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    El cas català des d’una perspectiva nord-europea: marcs ideològics i legislació lingüística2018In: El català, llengua mitjana d’Europa: Multilingüisme, globalització i sostenibilitat lingüística / [ed] Albert Bastardas i Boada, Emili Boix-Fuster, Rosa M. Torrens, Barcelona: Octaedro, 2018, p. 61-77Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 50.
    Kuteeva, Maria
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    European perspectives on second language writing pedagogy2018In: The TESOL Encyclopedia of English Language Teaching / [ed] John I. Liontas, John Wiley & Sons, 2018Chapter in book (Refereed)
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