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  • 1. Wall, Tony
    et al.
    Fries, Julia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Humanities and Social Sciences Education.
    Rowe, Nick
    Malone, Niamh
    Österlind, Eva
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Humanities and Social Sciences Education.
    Drama and theatre for health and wellbeing2020In: Good Health and Well-Being / [ed] Walter Leal Filho, Tony Wall, Anabela Marisa Azul, Luciana Brandli, Pinar Gökcin Özuyar, Springer, 2020Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The rock art of indigenous communities from 20,000 years ago have been interpreted as early indications of how humans have connected performance, in a broad sense, with the health and well-being of their communities (Fleischer and Grehan, 2016). Now, at a global level, there is increasing recognition that drama and theatre can facilitate a variety of health and wellbeing outcomes for an extensive range of groups, not pre-determined by affluence or socioeconomic status (APPG, 2017). In a broad sense, drama and theatre are a constellation of arts based practices, processes, and spaces, which intentionally work with more or less fictive characters, roles, relationships, and plots, in order to generate a wide range of experiences or outcomes (Wall, Österlind and Fries, 2018, forthcoming). Indeed, theatre and drama have been described as “the most integrative of all the arts: they include singing, dancing, painting, sculpture, storytelling, music, puppetry, poetry and the art of acting” (British Medical Association, 2011, p 10), which can help people to understand and then change how they relate to and then live out their own world.

  • 2. Wall, Tony
    et al.
    Österlind, Eva
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Humanities and Social Sciences Education.
    Fries, Julia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Humanities and Social Sciences Education.
    Arts based approaches for sustainability2020In: Encyclopedia of Sustainability in Higher Education / [ed] Walter Leal Filho, Springer, 2020Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The arts encompass a broad and diverse landscape of interrelated creative practices and professions, including performance arts (including music, dance, drama, and theatre), literary arts (including literature, story, and poetry), and the visual arts (including painting, design, film) (see UNESCO, 2006). They have been explicitly linked to sustainable development in higher education at a global level through UNESCO’s Road Map for Arts Education (UNESCO, 2006) and The Seoul Agenda: Goals for the Development of Arts Education (UNESCO, 2010). Specifically, the arts have been deployed to promote human rights, enhancing education, promoting cultural diversity, enhancing well-being and, most broadly, “to resolving the social and cultural challenges facing today’s world” (UNESCO, 2010: 8)...

  • 3. Wall, Tony
    et al.
    Österlind, Eva
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Humanities and Social Sciences Education.
    Fries, Julia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Humanities and Social Sciences Education.
    Art-Based teaching on sustainable development2020In: Encyclopedia of Sustainability in Higher Education / [ed] Walter Leal Filho, Springer, 2020Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The connections between art, art making, education, and responsibility in relation to the wider natural and social world have been given increasing attention over the last thirty years. For example, there have been a variety of journal special issues dedicated to art, education, and: ecology (Krug, 1997), social justice and social change (Bolin, 1999), community and responsibility (Carpenter, 2004), ecology and responsibility (Stout 2007), health and wellbeing (Haywood Rolling 2017), and human rights (Kraehe 2017). Such a rise has been linked to trends in the human search for meaning and significance amongst (and resistance against) globalisation, domination of market forces, and an increasingly complex and chaotic environment (Taylor and Ladkin, 2009)...

  • 4.
    Andersson, Pernilla
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Humanities and Social Sciences Education.
    Embodied experiences of ‘decision-making’ in face of uncertain and complex sustainability issues2019In: Sustainable Development Teaching: Ethical and Political Challenges / [ed] Katrien Van Poeck, Leif Östman, Johan Öhman, London: Routledge, 2019Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The ‘wicked’ character of sustainability issues points to the need for education to prepare students to make decisions (also) in the absence of clear guidelines and regulation. This chapter contributes to this need by presenting teaching approaches that offer students embodied experiences of decision-making in face of sustainability problems characterised by uncertainty and complexity. Short practical examples illuminating situations in business education at upper secondary level are provided to illuminate: (a) when different worldviews regarding how sustainability problems should or could be addressed come to the fore, and (b) emancipatory educational qualities in terms of subjectification. The different worldviews that comes to fore in the practical examples relates to whether or not trade automatically leads to socially and environmentally optimal outcomes, and whether a business (person) should be guided by an a-moral/a-political or moral/political business ideal. The practical examples illuminate what could be described as dislocatory moments. Drawing on the concept of ‘dislocatory moments’ the chapter presents a didactic model that could be used to identify room for subjectification processes together with a change of views regarding sustainability issues.  The ambition is to facilitate teachers’ development of teaching that could contribute to change for sustainability without compromising emancipatory education ideals. 

  • 5.
    Berglund, Jenny
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Humanities and Social Sciences Education.
    State-Funded Faith-Based Schooling for Muslims in the North2019In: Religion & Education, ISSN 1550-7394, E-ISSN 1949-8381, Vol. 46, no 2, p. 210-233Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    An emerging option in several European countries has been the state provision of publicly funded Islamic education. It is an alternative that lies at the heart of concerns over religious freedom, equal rights to education, integration, and social cohesion, but that is also connected to matters of securitization and the state’s attempt to control Islam. This article compares the provision of faith-based schooling in general, but publicly funded Islamic education in particular, in Finland and Sweden—two neighboring countries, historically and culturally connected, but with a different approach to faith based schooling.

  • 6.
    Berglund, Jenny
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Humanities and Social Sciences Education.
    Sociological perspectives on religion and education2019In: Brill Research Perspectives in Religion and Education, ISSN 2589-5303, Vol. 1, no 1, p. 46-65Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 7.
    Berglund, Jenny
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Humanities and Social Sciences Education.
    Gent, Bill
    Qur’anic education and non-confessional RE: an intercultural perspective2019In: Intercultural Education, ISSN 1467-5986, E-ISSN 1469-8439, Vol. 30, no 3, p. 323-334Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article focuses on the reported experiences of Muslim students that regularly shift between Muslim ‘supplementary education’ (including its traditional confessional focus on learning to read Arabic and then memorise and recite the Qur’an) and mainstream school education (including its ‘inclusive’ form of religious education’). The aim has been to better comprehend how these students make sense of this dual educational experience while negotiating the knowledge, skills, and values that are taught to them by two often seemingly disparate institutions. A further aim is to place our findings within the growing field of intercultural education. Though both types of education are often thought to be distinct and oppositional – the former as non-confessional and ‘modern’, the latter as confessional and ‘outmoded’ – both English and Swedish students were able to identify a degree of symbiosis between the two, particularly in relation to the process of memorisation. Thus, it became increasingly clear to the researchers that Muslim student reflection on their participation in both traditions of education had an intercultural dimension in the sense of encouraging dialogue and discussion across educational cultures prompting new knowledge and understanding. This article lays out some of the evidence for this conclusion.

  • 8.
    Björklund Boistrup, Lisa
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Mathematics and Science Education.
    Lindberg, Viveca
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Humanities and Social Sciences Education.
    A framework for analysing assessment in working life and vocational education2019In: Nofa7 Abstracts, Stockholm University, 2019, p. 36-36Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper we aim to discuss a research framework for analysing assessment in working life. We view assessment as a broad notion, taking place formally, through tests, coursework and the like, and informally through for example feedback during ongoing work. We argue that education, and significantly vocational education, has much to learn from taking knowledge about assessment as part of working life into account.

    Assessment in working life is in this paper viewed as a teaching content in vocational education. For students in vocational programmes, part of Swedish upper secondary school, it is highly relevant to learn about how working competence may be evaluated in their future occupations. Moreover, teachers carrying out assessment within the vocational programmes have much to learn from the ways assessment may be ‘done’ in working life. To assess vocational competence, also within vocational education, is different from formal educational assessment, since it is about capturing contextual knowing in action. In these actions, there are different logics (see Ellström, 2010) to pay attention to. One logic is a logic of production, where conformity and regulations are essential, and one is a logic of development, where problem solving and creativity are essential. So far, not much research has focused on assessment in working life in a broad sense, with relevance for vocational education.

    Assessment of vocational knowing is a field of research shared by disciplines like education, linguistics, economics and sociology. One theme in the literature addresses assessment for employment. This part of the research field is dominated by economists focusing on management issues, such as tests designed for selection of employees. Another theme is rather new in this field of research; assessment in skills competitions. A third theme is assessment in workplaces. Apart from some studies on assessment of employees’ performances and behaviour, there are few studies (eg. Kvale, 2007; Tanggaard & Elmholt, 2008) on assessment of vocational knowing at work.

    When discussing a framework for analysing assessment in working life, we will draw on theoretical considerations and make critical connections to previous research. In our theoretical considerations we incorporate three levels of practice: personal, interpersonal, and community processes (Rogoff, 2008), all in relation to assessment. To further examine aspects of vocational content in assessment, we adopt a framework of praxeology by Chevallard (2006), where praxis corresponds to ‘know-how’ and logos to ‘know-why’.

  • 9.
    Björklund, Mattias
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Humanities and Social Sciences Education.
    Teaching financial literacy: Competence, context and strategies among Swedish teachers2019In: Journal of Social Science Education, ISSN 1611-9665, E-ISSN 1618-5293, Vol. 18, no 2, p. 28-48, article id 10.4119/jsse-1426Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The aim of this article is to compare if and how experienced and novice teachers differ from each other regarding teaching and expressed aims regarding their financial literacy education.

    Method: Thematic analysis together with the PCK framework were used to analyse 21 teacher interviews.

    Findings: Both aims and teaching differ between experienced and novice teachers even though none of the interviewed teachers has any formal content knowledge regarding financial literacy. This seems related to experienced teachers using their everyday financial knowledge when teaching where novice teachers use their pedagogical skills and refer to syllabus.

    Practical implications: Both pre-service and in-service teachers should receive a financial literacy education. Teachers’ experience from financial literacy instruction should be considered when designing teacher training in financial literacy.

  • 10.
    Björklund, Mattias
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Humanities and Social Sciences Education.
    Teaching financial literacy – investigating teachers’ knowledge of context2019Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 11. Christidis, Maria
    et al.
    Lindberg, Viveca
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Humanities and Social Sciences Education.
    Subject-Integrated Teaching for Expanded Vocational Knowing and Everyday Situations in a Swedish Upper Secondary Health and Social Care Program2019In: Vocations and Learning, ISSN 1874-785X, E-ISSN 1874-7868Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to explore what subject-integrated teaching of vocational subjects, ethics and health care, contributed with in terms of vocational knowing. The case study was ethnographically inspired and followed a group of students (16 +) and their teachers in a Swedish Health and Social Care Program while they worked with a theme unit called Death for two weeks in autumn 2012. Data comprised observations, field notes, and audio recordings of the planning and teaching of the theme unit, informal discussions with teachers and students, handouts, a theme booklet, and student assignments. Analysis was based on concepts related to cultural historical activity theory, especially emphasizing rules, tools, actions, operations, and contradictions. Results showed three major objects emphasized in the teacher–student interaction and the tools chosen to support the subject-integrated teaching activity: vocational knowing related to vocational ethics, to everyday ethics, and argumentative skills. Manifestations of contradictions in the form of dilemmas related to the examples that teachers copied from a textbook. As these examples were mainly contextualized in everyday situations, and there are no formal ethical guidelines for nursing assistants on which teachers could rely on, teachers’ narratives were used to complement these examples. Students’ argumentative skills were emphasized and related to personal situations, in which ethical arguments for justification in vocationally relevant situations were made unclear.

  • 12.
    Eriksson, Inger
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Humanities and Social Sciences Education.
    Materializing students’ algebraic arguments in classroom discussion – a learning activity perspective2019Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    General description on research questions, objectives and theoretical framework

    Learning activity, is a special form activity within the activity theory tradition. It was first developed by El’konin and Davydov (Davydov, 2008). The underpinning cultural historical and activity theoretical principles give us an understanding that students in order to develop knowledge must be involved in a content rich activity where they can work theoretically with general (abstract) principles and structures of the object of knowledge (Chaiklin, 2002). Further, in order to realize a learning activity, students’ (and teacher’s) actions that forms the theoretical work, must be mediated by proper tools. But which tools can enable what type of knowledge?

    In mathematics for the youngest students, that I will discuss in this paper, there is a long tradition that advocate that it is of great importance to use tools that can help students to manipulate with the content in order to understand e.g. numbers – physical things like buttons, toys, fruit, etc. are often used to illustrate e.g. 4+5=. This is often talked about as concrete math-teaching supported by manipulatives. In El'konin and the Davydov program (ED), the main purpose is instead the opposite: to allow students to develop a theoretical understanding of mathematical knowledge (Davydov, 2008). In the ED-program subject specific learning models are used as mediating tools for students in their trying to grasp theoretical aspects of a specific content, e.g. a concept (Gorbov & Chudinova, 2000; Repkin, 2003; Zuckerman, 2004). Aspects that are difficult for students to grasp empirically.

    The issue for this paper is, thus, what function learning models can have in mathematical whole class discussions. What can be used as a learning model? And, how can the object of knowledge be elaborated with the help of learning models in whole-class discussions?

    Methods/methodology

    The paper is using data from several a research project[1] based on learning study as research approach (Carlgren, Eriksson & Runesson, 2017) where the aim was to develop tasks and learning models that could enhance students’ ability to reason algebraically. The research lessons was video-taped and transcribed and analyzed with the help of questions like: what in the planned situation do the students identify as a learning model and how do they use it? Do they transform the learning model and if so in what ways and for what purpose? What indicators can be identified of how the learning model facilitates the whole class discussions? What in the teachers actions, especially communicative actions, facilitate or hindrance in students discussions?

    Expected outcomes/preliminary results/implications

    In the analysis of the research lesson three functions of the learning models used in whole class discussions were identified. First, a learning model enables individuals to make his or her sometimes rather unclear verbal explanations much more comprehensible both for the student that puts forward an idea and for his or her classmates. Second, a learning model if it is available e.g. on the blackboard for the students' exploration, a verbal argument can be available to the group when the words are no longer heard. Third, the learning model itself can be transformed by the students (or by the teacher) in new ways. Such modelling can make other aspects of the content available.

    Further, the analysis also indicates that not only the construction of the learning model is demanding but also the way it is used in as a tool facilitating the classroom discussion.

    The construction requires a solid theoretical understanding of the subject. A theoretical structure is not always easy to identify and to find a way to transform such knowing into something that can function as a learning model for students can be even more demanding. In our cases we used learning models from the ED-program or let us be inspired by it (Davydov, Gorbov, Mikulina, & Saveleva, 2012). In addition, we have experienced that how the teacher act in the classroom is of great importance. One requirement, if a teaching situation will be established as a learning activity, is the teachers’ actions. The teacher cannot simply tell the student what to do, how to use the learning model or tell the students what the problem is. Instead, a learning activity will only be established if the students' experiences a need and a motive to solve the problem. A learning activity is thus is very fragile (Eriksson, 2017, Repkin, 2003).

    Concluding

    Materializing theoretical thinking helps the students to act with agency within a learning activity. In such learning activity abstract structures can be visualized and collaboratively explored.

  • 13.
    Eriksson, Inger
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Humanities and Social Sciences Education.
    Fred, Jenny
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Mathematics and Science Education.
    Nordin, Anna-Karin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Mathematics and Science Education.
    Nyman, Martin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Mathematics and Science Education.
    Wettergren, Sanna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Humanities and Social Sciences Education.
    Enabling students’ participation in algebraic reasoning with ‘learning models’ as tools for theoretical work2019In: NOFA7 Abstracts, 2019, p. 66-66Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The issue for this paper is to discuss conditions for students’ participation in theoretical classroom discussions. In order to develop students’ ability to reason and solve problems algebraically Lins and Kaput (2004) argue that it is important to introduce algebra early in mathematics education. In line with this, researchers working within the sociocultural tradition argue that this may start as early as in first grade (Lins & Kaput, 2004). The so-called Davydov programme (e.g. Schmittau, 2005) is referred to as a promising alternative type of teaching, enhancing young students’ capability to reason algebraically. Central to the Davydov programme is the concept of ’learning model’. Such models (not to be confused with mathematical models) are used to enable students’ elaboration of mathematical phenomena. The characteristics of a learning model is that it materialises central theoretical aspects of a content. Further, it creates specific conditions necessary for students to understand and elaborate on each other’s arguments. However, there are many demanding issues related to the design of such learning models that needs to be further developed. In this paper we address the following research question: What in students’ classroom discussions can be taken as signs of emergent ability to reason algebraically? In this paper we use data from two learning studies conducted in 2017–2018. One in grade 1 (age 7) with three iteratively designed and revised lessons, and one in grade 5 (age 11) with four iteratively designed and revised lessons. We focus especially on how students use learning models as tools to enforce and maintain a collective reasoning indifferent communicative situations. To identify possible algebraic reasoning we have analyzed the communicative situations by drawing upon Toulmin’s (2003) model of argumentation with claim, data, warrant and backing. The tentative results indicate that the ability to work with the learning models not only facilitated an individual student to clarify and substantiate his or her arguments, but also enabled other students to follow and elaborate on the reasoning. This paper also contributes with examples of tasks and especially how to set the tasks in motion to enable students’ theoretical work.

  • 14.
    Eriksson, Inger
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Humanities and Social Sciences Education.
    Wettergren, Sanna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Humanities and Social Sciences Education.
    Nordin, Anna-Karin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Mathematics and Science Education.
    Fred, Jenny
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Mathematics and Science Education.
    Fermsjö, Roger
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Humanities and Social Sciences Education.
    Nyman, Martin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Mathematics and Science Education.
    Gerholm, Verner
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Humanities and Social Sciences Education.
    Same critical aspects regardless of age – indicating lack of experiences of algebraic expressions2019Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The issue for this paper is to discuss what can explain that students in different grades seem to experience a phenomenon in more or less the same way and thus, need to discern the same critical aspects in teaching. Data comes from a three-year-long learning study project conducted in four different Swedish schools, in K–9: preschool, grade 4, 6 and 9 respectively.  

    Understanding what students yet need to learn in relation to a specific content is of importance if to organize a teaching situation where students can work in a zone of proximal development (Vygotsky, 1986). Within the theory of variation the concept of critical aspects is regarded as bearing such information for teachers to use when designing teaching (Marton, 2005; Runesson, 2013).

    In the research project we used phenomenography as a theoretical framework in search for critical aspects. Phenomenography is a research approach aiming to understand qualitatively different ways of experiencing a phenomenon. A basic assumption is that we, on the basis of what we have experienced in life, what situations and problems we encountered, experience a phenomenon in a specific way (Marton, 1981; Eriksson, 1999). But the ways we experience a phenomenon do not vary very much. This is believed to be because the contexts and activities do not vary at all. A phenomenographical analysis tends to result in a limited but qualitatively different way of experiencing a phenomenon (Eriksson, 1999). Critical aspects can be identified when comparing different ways of experiencing a phenomenon.

    The research question addressed in this paper is what possible explanations can be found that students in different grades seem to experience a phenomenon in more or less the same way and thus, need to discern the same critical aspects in teaching.

    In order to identify critical aspects groups of students from each grade were interviewed when presented algebraic expressions and some possible answers. The interviews were transcribed and phenomenographically analysed.

    The results indicates that regardless of earlier schooling the students experienced the phenomenon of algebraic expressions in a similar way and thus same critical aspects were identified as needed to discern for the students in the four grades. Based on the analysis three different critical aspects were identified. Students from preschool class and grade 4 were interviewed during the first project year and the students from Grade 6 and 10 the second project year. The analysis from the first project year resulted in critical aspects common for the students and that was not so surprising since we knew that these students had not yet experienced algebraic expressions. However almost the same critical aspects were identified in the analysis of the interviewed students in Grade 6 and 9 during second project year. This was more of a surprise since the students had met algebraic expressions in school.

    The discussion will focus on these findings in relation to what possible experiences student may have of discerning aspects of algebraic expressions in relation to the content of mathematical education.

  • 15.
    Eriksson, Maria
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Humanities and Social Sciences Education.
    Flickblickar: Visuella berättelser om, av och genom gymnasieelevers kroppar2019Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis investigates enactments of femininities, bodies and images among young women in two art and design classes at urban Swedish upper-secondary schools. The theoretical framework combines visual culture, performativity and new materialism, contributing to art education research and girlhood studies. Based on a nine-month ethnographic field study, including the collection of a) ethnographic field notes, b) photo documentation of the participants’ images created in classrooms and during spare time, and c) photo-elicitation-based interviews, the study explores students’ everyday engagement with images, referred to as visual narratives. These were investigated in relation to norms surrounding the becoming of girls, at a time when the schools in the study were both strongly promoting gender equality and some public debates suggested a postfeminist condition, i.e. that feminism has moved beyond the balance of equality. The thesis suggests that the relationships between visual narratives and bodies revolve around a particular type of gaze: the girl gaze, i.e. practices of looking, a communicative and aesthetic activity, in which the participants see themselves, their bodies and the world around them. Girl gazes consist of other gazes, such as the female gaze, the oppositional gaze, the transgender gaze or the white gaze. Each of these is investigated in three analytical chapters. In the chapter ‘White gazes’, theories of visual culture theory are combined with critical whiteness studies to analyse how certain bodies will not pass as white in a white school space in art teaching. Whilst talk about race in the Swedish antiracist classroom is taboo and silenced, race is indeed visible. For example, a subordinated non-white femininity is a theme in one actual school assignment. Colour-blindness, in a Swedish school context, should thus be understood not as a problem of seeing colour but as a taboo-laden silence when faced with stereotypes. The chapter ‘Screen gazes’ investigates how emotions circulate when visual narratives are produced on screens. Social media is often talked about as a female arena, and the making of selfies as narcissistic. However, allowing images that explore femininity and emotions to flow on social media might be a way to give femininity a place in the limelight. The study also discusses the humorous side of girl gazes, which may work as feminist counter-narratives by ridiculing gender norms. Finally, the chapter ‘Future gazes’ deals with aspirational identities – the embodiment of aesthetic ideals and future gazes. Tattoo culture, fitness culture and feminist statements in the form of art bricolage are studied as examples of work on bodies in relation to aesthetic ideals. These examples also came together in a common desire among the participants to become someone – to become known and recognised. In sum, in this thesis, the media-oriented term girl gaze – hitherto found with a hashtag in front of it, revealing its connection not with a scientific sphere but with social media – is a gaze constructed by gender and generation and other intersectional nexus points of social categories. Despite the commitment to gender equality in the classroom, the results show that equality is rather contested and continuously negotiated. The concept of the girl gaze can help to direct the analytical focus towards what is not yet visible, and to bring paradoxes surrounding girlhood and femininity to the surface.

  • 16.
    Fermsjö, Roger
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Humanities and Social Sciences Education.
    Gerholm, Verner
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Humanities and Social Sciences Education.
    Buchberger, Helena
    Nilsson, Birgitta
    Algebraic reasoning in upper secondary school2019Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The participants (n = 85) in this study were 16-17 years old and in their first year of upper secondary school in Sweden. In total, three lessons were recorded and transcribed, all with the same teacher. The first two lessons were conducted in a class of the Social Science Programme, i.e. a university-preparatory programme, and the third lesson in a class of the Building and Construction Programme, i.e. a vocational programme. The difference between the classes could be understood from their grade averages from compulsory school, 265 and 278 for the former two classes and 200 for the latter, where 340 is the highest possible score. The classes were chosen for different reasons, such as if there would be any differences according to former grades or choice of education. The intention was to use the same learning tasks in all classes, but small changes were made according to the analyses made after each lesson.

    Learning Study has been used in several studies, initially to test the Variation Theory, and is therefore also the most commonly used theory. It originates in the iterative process used in Lesson Study, and the methodology for Learning Study could be described by this iterative process:

    1. Find an object of learning
    2. Make a pre-test
    3. Design the lesson
    4. Implement the lesson
    5. Make a post-test
    6. Analyse the lesson
    7. Revise the lesson
    8. Return to 4

    Other theories have been used in former Learning Studies, e.g. Learning Activity (LA). This study also uses LA as a theoretical framework and the research questions are:

    • What kind of tasks and discussions in the classroom could lead to the development of algebraic reasoning?
    • What learning actions, i.e. algebraic reasoning, could be shown orally, bodily or symbolically?
    • What qualities in the reasoning could be seen? 

    In order to analyse the lessons, the LA framework was used. Aspects to examine and questions to ask were, for example:

    • What is the learning task, and what is it possible for the student to understand of the task?
    • What is intended with the lesson, and what are the students trying to do?
    • What is known/unknown for the students?

    An important part of LA is reflection, e.g. considering goals, motives, means of action by oneself and others, etc. Important questions were thus:

    • How are solutions handled (both by the teacher and by classmates)
    • How are solutions evaluated in class?
    • What kind of reflections are made?

    The preliminary results from the study show that the mathematical tool could be helpful, if used, in developing algebraic reasoning. Its usefulness could depend either, or both, on the way in which the tool was introduced and the way in which the learning tasks were presented and handled in class. Analyses in relation to the LA framework also raised questions about the motive of the tasks, e.g. reducing variables. The importance of this in a mathematical sense is clear, but the task did not enable the students to see this.

  • 17. Forsling, Josef
    et al.
    Gustavsson, CarolineStockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Humanities and Social Sciences Education.Wenell, Fredrik
    "Man ska vara sig själv": En bok om ungdomar, tro och delaktighet2019Collection (editor) (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Hur man ska förstå ”dagens ungdom” tycks vara en evig och olöslig gåta för de lite äldre. Det gäller också vår tid: Undersökningar visar att dagens unga har andra värderingar än sina föräldrar, och att de oroar sig för andra saker. Dessutom formas deras liv av ny teknologi och ständigt föränderliga sociala plattformar.

    Men hur är det med de eviga frågorna: hur relaterar unga till religion, andlighet och församlingsliv? I denna unika volym kombineras sociologiska data med kulturanalys och teologiska reflexioner. Några av Skandinaviens mest kompetenta forskare och teologer ger oss en inblick i pågående projekt som rör unga i gudstjänsten, lovsång, bibelläsning, konfirmandarbete och barns möte med kristen tro. Detta är omistlig läsning för alla som arbetar eller lever med unga människor. Boken är dessutom ett bidrag till en bredare förståelse av religionens plats i ett pluralistiskt samhälle.

  • 18.
    Gunnarsson, Karin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Humanities and Social Sciences Education.
    Att samhandla med manualer: Föränderliga deltagare i skolors hälsofrämjande arbete2019In: Pedagogisk forskning i Sverige, ISSN 1401-6788, E-ISSN 2001-3345, Vol. 25, no 1, p. 68-84Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [sv]

    I denna text ställs frågor om hur skolors hälsofrämjande arbete formas och blir till tillsammans med manualer. Syftet är att undersöka vad manualerna gör och hur de görs som samhandlande aktörer i detta arbete. Genom att studera händelser i ett manualbaserat program med aktör-nätverksteori blir fokus hur manualer, elever, gruppledare, klassrum och känslor samverkar och samskapas i det hälsofrämjande arbetet. I analysen framkommer hur manualer sammankopplade i nätverk blir till en trygg aktör, en aktör som tillsammans med evidens och forskning erbjuder kunskap om de elever som deltar och hur hälsa ska främjas. De blir samtidigt obekväma och stressande aktörer. Analysen visar hur manualerna samtidigt blir poröst konstruerade och stabilt fixerande. Med denna förståelse av hur manualerna inverkar i det hälsofrämjande arbetet blir det svårt att förutse dess effekter och verkningar. Ambitionen måste då vara att utforma ett hälsofrämjande arbete med engagemang och experimenterande, en praktik där många berättelser och världar kan ta form.

  • 19.
    Gunnarsson, Karin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Humanities and Social Sciences Education.
    In the middle of things: encountering questions about equality in social studies education2019In: Gender and Education, ISSN 0954-0253, E-ISSN 1360-0516Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper explores a teaching practice that considers equality in social studies in a Swedish upper secondary school. The questions explored were: What become produced within the teaching practice? and How to encounter these issues without reproducing them? To explore these questions I put to work a theoretical framework of feminist post-humanism and a participatory methodological approach. This meant that I collaborated with one teacher and participated in planning and teaching activities. The analysis of the teaching practice focuses on three events involving cries, lines and stairs; these events display the complex processes in which norms and categorizations are produced and revealed how both stabilizations and tensions became enacted within the teaching. In the concluding remarks, I further discuss these tensions in terms of troubles and hopes and elaborate on the encounter between social studies curriculum and a feminist post-humanist approach.

  • 20.
    Gustavsson, Caroline
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Humanities and Social Sciences Education.
    En process på riktigt: Lärande och undervisning i Västerås pastorat 2018. Redovisning av ett forskningsprojekt2019Report (Other academic)
  • 21.
    Gustavsson, Caroline
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Humanities and Social Sciences Education.
    Gudstjänst, intressefokus och längtan i en aktivitetsmättad tid: Fallstudium av gudstjänstarbete i Asarums pastorat2019In: "Man ska vara sig själv": En bok om ungdomar, tro och delaktighet / [ed] Josef Forsling, Caroline Gustavsson, Fredrik Wenell, Örebro: Marcus förlag , 2019, p. 157-176Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Gustavsson tar i artikeln sin utgångspunkt i ett empiriskt material från Asarums pastorat i Blekinge. Medarbetarna i Asarum har mellan åren 2017 och 2019 målmedvetet arbetat för att öka människors delaktighet i söndagens huvudgudstjänst. Gustavsson diskuterar i artikeln hur man utifrån studiens resultat kan förstå varför statistiken över gudstjänstfirande är fortsatt vikande, trots denna satsning på gudstjänsten.

  • 22.
    Gustavsson, Caroline
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Humanities and Social Sciences Education.
    Svenska kyrkans huvudgudstjänst mellan tradition och förnyelse2019In: Svensk kyrkotidning, ISSN 0346-2153, no 5, p. 144-147Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Gustavsson ställer i artikeln frågor som rör de senaste årens gudstjänstförnyelse i Svenska kyrkan. Hur hr de församlngar som undersökts i artikeln valt att förhålla sig till huvudgudstjänsten i sitt förnyelsearbete? Hur har man valt att arbeta med barnens plats i gudstjänsten? Hur har kyrkoherdens roll och ansvar beskrivits?

  • 23.
    Gustavsson, Caroline
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Humanities and Social Sciences Education.
    Is worldview a concept to be used in a Swedish and Scandinaivian context?2019Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 24.
    Gustavsson, Caroline
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Humanities and Social Sciences Education.
    Vulnerability as a quality in the classroom of, and in research in, religious education?2019Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 25.
    Halvarson Britton, Thérése
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Humanities and Social Sciences Education.
    Stabel Jørgensen, Camilla
    The construction of 'religions' during field visits2019In: Intercultural Education, ISSN 1467-5986, E-ISSN 1469-8439, Vol. 30, no 3, p. 306-322Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Field visits to churches, mosques, temples or other buildings used by religious groups, are often valued by students of religious education as an opportunity to engage with the reality' of the subject: religions as they exist in the world. The Council of Europe text Signposts specifies field visits as an important contributor to the religious dimension of intercultural education, but also identifies issues that need to be addressed by researchers and teachers. During an excursion, students interact with representatives who are likely to represent their tradition in one particular way. The aim of this paper is to investigate how the representation of religion and religiosity is constructed during excursions by representatives and visitors. We have developed an analytical tool based on the interpretive approach and the theory of speech genres. Based on our analysis of documentation related to four field visits with students to places of worship, we suggest how the different speech genres in play during an excursion can help in promoting awareness of different levels of religion: individual, group and the whole tradition.

  • 26.
    Hållander, Marie
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Humanities and Social Sciences Education.
    On the Verge of Tears: The Ambivalent Spaces of Emotions and Testimonies2019In: Studies in Philosophy and Education, ISSN 0039-3746, E-ISSN 1573-191X, Vol. 38, no 5, p. 467-480Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article discusses the relation between emotions and testimony, by asking the questions: What do emotions do? Are emotions possible and desirable starting points for teaching difficult and complex subjects such as injustice and historical wounds? This article explores the 2015 image and testimony of Alan Kurdi, lying on a beach of the Mediterranean Sea and the immense emotional response it elicited from the media. By critiquing emotions based on testimonies in teaching, by primarily following Ahmed (The cultural politics of emotion, Routledge, New York.  https://doi.org/10.4324/9780203700372, 2004) and Todd (Learning from the other: Levinas, psychoanalysis, and ethical possibilities in education. State University of New York Press, Albany, 2003), this article argues that emotions are cultural practices, not psychological states, and, thus, are relational. On this point, the argument is developed into two different movements, first, the effects offered by listening; second, opacity in relation to transparency, based on the thoughts of Glissant (Poetics of relation. University of Michigan Press, Ann Arbor, 1997). The aspects of listening and opacity in relation to testimonies, in turn, yield an ambivalent space in which emotions play a role (regardless of whether or not that function is desired) in students encounter with testimonies and may, in turn, imply educational possibilities.

  • 27.
    Ignell, Caroline
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Davies, Peter
    Lundholm, Cecilia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Humanities and Social Sciences Education.
    Students' personal epistemological beliefs and climate change solutions2019Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Contemporary challenges demand deeper thinking from students and the public, including those challenges associated with food, energy, and water (FEW) security. For example, society’s increasing demand for energy contributes to human-induced climate change (IPCC 2015). Phenomena specifically related to FEW security are particularly relevant for investigating how epistemic cognition factors into learning, and the purpose of this symposium is to feature recent educational research studies examining learners’ epistemic cognition—including beliefs, attitudes, emotions, judgments, and behaviors—related to FEW phenomena. The research featured in this symposium will suggest preliminary implications for epistemic cognition learning and teaching to strengthen students’ and the public’s epistemic cognition and capacity to deal with current and future FEW challenges.

  • 28.
    Ignell, Caroline
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Davies, Peter
    Lundholm, Cecilia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Humanities and Social Sciences Education.
    Economic students’ beliefs of scientific knowledge and norms for action regarding climate change2019In: NOFA7 Abstracts, Stockholm University, 2019, p. 98-98Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study focuses on epistemic beliefs in relation to actions to mitigate climate change, and we investigate students’ beliefs and their support for societal actions and personal norms that direct individuals’ pro-environmental behaviour. Students’ conceptions of science - epistemic beliefs - concerns the way they regard scientific knowledge as fixed and certain, or evolving and uncertain. The study used a pen and pencil measurement distributed to the same students at two occasions, the first year’s (T1) measurement included 212 students in business and economics education, aged 17, and this was repeated a year later, in their final year. Changes are analysed through paired sample t-test, and partial correlation analyses were used to explore relations. Results show a weak and positive relation between the belief in certainty of knowledge and a norm of supporting taxes for solving climate change. At T2, a weak and negative relation was shown between recognising ‘science as having one clear-cut answer’ and ascribing solutions to climate change to both business and government. The results could suggest that a view of science as certain can influence the willingness to pay and contribute to solutions, and not ascribing government a responsibility. This however seems contradictory, as government are the initiators of policies such as CO2 taxes. Further research is needed to explain how epistemic beliefs can impact on norms for actions.

  • 29.
    Ignell, Caroline
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Davies, Peter
    Lundholm, Cecilia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Humanities and Social Sciences Education.
    A longitudinal study of upper secondary school students’ values and beliefs regarding policy responses to climate change2019In: Environmental Education Research, ISSN 1350-4622, E-ISSN 1469-5871, Vol. 25, no 5, p. 615-632Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article explores changes of environmental values and beliefs among secondary school business and economics students regarding government and market solutions to climate change. The quantitative study is longitudinal and a survey was administrated to students at two occasions including 212 participants in the first measurement. Results show a small significant increase in importance for altruistic, biospheric and egoistic value orientations at average. At an individual level, there are substantial movements over time. Nearly two-thirds of the students changed the strength of their value orientations over time. Taxes and legislation were regarded as the most effective solutions to climate change, however there was a decrease in seeing market prices as important mechanisms for change. Analysis suggested no direct relationship between change in environmental value orientation and change in norms. However indirect associations were mediated by changing beliefs in the efficacy of education and information and the efficacy of tax policies. For example, students who became more egoistic and more convinced about the efficacy of tax were less likely than others to be willing to take personal actions.

  • 30.
    Jackson, Robert
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Humanities and Social Sciences Education. University of Warwick, UK.
    50 years on: the Shap working party on world religions in education and its publications2019In: Journal of Beliefs and Values, ISSN 1361-7672, E-ISSN 1469-9362, Vol. 40, no 1, p. 45-54Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Shap Working Party on World Religions in Education celebrates its 50th anniversary in April 2019. In marking this event, the present article offers a summary of the history of the Shap Working Party in relation to its publications. The overview includes material published by the Shap Working Party itself and material published by members of the Shap Working Party which reflects Shap's general approach and values. Many Shap publications and articles about Shap are available with open access on the Shap website and more will appear in celebration of the Working Party's 50th Anniversary. The present article is dedicated to the memory of Professor John Hinnells who had a key role in establishing the Shap Working Party and who died in 2018.

  • 31.
    Jackson, Robert
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Humanities and Social Sciences Education. University of Warwick, UK.
    Postscript on Dialogue and Inclusive Religious Education: The ReDi Studies in a European Context2019In: Religion & Education, ISSN 1550-7394, E-ISSN 1949-8381, Vol. 46, no 1, p. 130-146Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This postscript relates the findings of ReDi studies to the Council of Europe's work on the religious dimension of intercultural education, and to studies conducted by members of the Signposts International Research Network (SIRN). It summarizes developments in religious education and their relationship to human rights, and then focuses on Council of Europe's work. The findings reported by ReDi and SIRN researchers are seen to be complementary, both addressing issues raised in the Council of Europe's Signposts book.

  • 32.
    Johansson, Patrik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Humanities and Social Sciences Education.
    Intercultural historical learning through inquiry-based teaching with archaeological artefacts in primary school2019In: NOFA7 Abstracts, 2019, p. 104-104Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    A current challenge in history education is to counteract the construction of strong ethnocentric master-narratives which may limit pupils’ understandings of the dynamics of history in terms of migration and cultural encounters (Rüsen, 2004). One approach is to develop pupils’ intercultural competencies, i.e. their abilities to interact appropriately in intercultural situations, using intercultural knowledge, skills and attitudes to orient themselves in the world (Deardorff, 2006). History education has a role to play in enabling the development of these competencies through intercultural historical learning (Nordgren and Johansson, 2015). The paper tests the relevance and effectiveness of three design principles through their operationalisations as teaching in enabling the learning of intercultural perspectives on the Viking age in historical inquiry with archaeological artefacts in primary school, years 4 and 5. The design principles connect archaeological artefacts to historical inquiry, contextual facts and evidence. Two research questions are addressed: how do the operationalisations of the design principles enable learning and how may operationalisations impede learning? The research project was designed and carried out by a group consisting of one researcher (the presenter) and three experienced teachers from three schools (56 pupils from three classes) in Stockholm, Sweden. The study is framed as educational design research and data was analysed qualitatively with content-focused conversation analysis and variation theory. Hence, learning is understood as changed co-participation in the practice of historical inquiry (Rogoff, 2003) and as discernment of aspects of the learning object (Marton, 2015). During the research lessons, the pupils investigated the past by seeking answers to a historical inquiry question through the interpretation of archaeological artefacts. Based on previous research (Levstik, Henderson, and Lee, 2014) the research group assumed that starting form material culture in the form of archaeological artefacts would be beneficial in teaching intercultural perspectives to young learners. An intervention in the form of research lessons and associated tools were designed and implemented. The findings indicate that the design principles are relevant in enabling learning (connecting intercultural archaeological artefacts to inquiry, connecting artefacts to context and exploring multiple artefacts). It is suggested that the final step in the enquiry sequence is revised to put focus on historical reasoning rather than on historical evidence. The study points to possibilities in teaching intercultural historical perspectives through historical inquiry in primary school and archaeological artefacts can be powerful in initiating historical reasoning.

  • 33.
    Johansson, Patrik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Humanities and Social Sciences Education.
    Historical enquiry in primary school: Teaching interpretation of archaeological artefacts from an intercultural perspective2019In: History Education Research Journal, ISSN 2631-9713, Vol. 16, no 2, p. 248-273Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The article aims to explore how learning historical interpretation of Viking age archaeological artefacts from an intercultural perspective could be facilitated through historical enquiry in primary school. Three design principles were formulated for the teaching: 1) enquiry based upon an authentic intercultural question, 2) enquiry with a focus on source interpretation, and 3) enquiry using material culture in the form of archaeological artefacts. Two questions were addressed: first, how did the teaching design and practice facilitate the intended learning, and second, what obstacles to learning were encountered as a result of the design? Research data was analysed qualitatively using content-focused conversation analysis and variation theory. The findings in relation to the first question indicated that the design principles helped teachers facilitate learning through historical enquiry from an intercultural perspective, and that archaeological artefacts can inspire investigations into history by activating pupils’ historical consciousness. The answer to the second question indicated that pupils had difficulties responding to historical enquiries with synthesised inferences based on historical evidence. A revision of the final phase of the enquiry suggests that focus is on discussing reasonable explanations in relation to artefacts, rather than synthesising historical inferences based on evidence. This study points to possibilities of teaching historical interpretation and intercultural perspectives through historical enquiry in primary school and suggests that archaeological artefacts can be used to initiate historical learning.

  • 34.
    Johansson, Patrik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Humanities and Social Sciences Education.
    Historical enquiry with archaeological artefacts in primary school2019In: Nordidactica: Journal of Humanities and Social Science Education, ISSN 2000-9879, no 1, p. 78-104Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The article contributes with knowledge of primary school pupils’ learning of historical enquiry with an intercultural perspective on the Viking age and investigates what it means for pupils to learn to interpret archaeological artefacts. Research was conducted as a Learning study with 10 and 11-year-old pupils and lessons were performed as historical enquiry with archaeological artefacts. Three questions are posed: (1) how were the pupils’ historical consciousness activated by the archaeological artefacts, (2) how did the pupils experience the task of interpreting archaeological artefacts with an intercultural perspective, and (3) what are critical aspects for this learning? Three variation patterns that activated pupils’ historical consciousness are identified, including (a) material, (b) cultural and (c) normative contrasts. Four perception categories for historical interpretation of archaeological artefacts and three critical aspects are also identified. It is suggested that it is critical for the pupils to discern (i) historicity, (ii) historical representativeness and (iii) intercultural interaction in relation to artefacts and historical narratives. The study suggests that teachers could start from archaeological artefacts to activate pupils’ historical consciousness, rather than from textbook narratives and that pupils’ perceptions should be seen as a resource in enabling historical learning. Also, historical enquiry appears to be a reasonable approach to teaching intercultural perspectives on a historical content. These findings can be valuable for history educators and researchers who engage in teaching historical enquiry with an intercultural perspective from material culture.

  • 35.
    Johansson, Patrik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Humanities and Social Sciences Education.
    Lära historia genom källor: Undervisning och lärande av historisk källtolkning i grundskolan och gymnasieskolan2019Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This doctoral thesis is concerned with how students learn historical source interpretation and the design of facilitating teaching practices. Source interpretation is at the core of historians’ professional practice and, while being a key aspect of historical learning, it is sometimes misunderstood or misrepresented in history teaching. To better understand these issues two educational design research field studies were conducted in middle and upper secondary schools to explore how students learn historical source interpretation. The historical content in upper secondary school concerned the process of democratisation in Sweden, while the middle school content was the Viking Age. Source materials in upper secondary school included various text sources, while archaeological artefacts were used in middle school.

    The research object was historical source interpretation, or the ability to understand the meaning of sources in relation to the historical questions and contexts formulated and dealt with in history teaching. Source interpretation is one element of the ability to reason historically. It is a theoretical construct that has a heuristic function along with the development of historical consciousness. Four research questions are addressed: i) What do middle and upper secondary school students know when they have developed the ability to reason historically when engaged in source interpretation, ii) What are critical aspects of learning to reason historically when engaged in source interpretation, iii) What are similarities and differences between middle and upper secondary school students' learning of historical reasoning in source interpretation, and iv) How can history teaching facilitate the learning of historical reasoning through source interpretation?

    An interventionist and theory-informed research methodology, in the form of learning study, was used to develop teaching practices while generating empirical data. A compilation of four peer-reviewed articles simultaneously contribute knowledge to the practice of history teaching and to the theory of history didactics. Two articles address the first two questions of the qualitative meaning of learning source interpretation using phenomenography and variation theory to analyse students' perceptions and to identify the critical aspects of discernment that students must learn. From the perspective of variation theory, it is argued that learning source interpretation can be regarded as obtaining differentiated ways of seeing, as previous experiences are supplemented with more complex perceptions.

    The third question is addressed by comparing students’ developing of source interpretation skills in middle and upper secondary school. One finding of the comparison is that younger students’ learning reflects an increasing understanding of what history is, whereas older students learn to use the disciplinary tools and methods of history. Two articles address the final question regarding the role of teaching by combining content-based conversation analysis with variation theory to analyse students' learning processes when working with source interpretation tasks. It is argued that students’ preunderstandings can be regarded and used as resources in teaching and learning. Finally, seven design principles are suggested to guide teachers in organising their teaching practice. These include motivating historical research through source work and activating historical consciousness through sources.

  • 36.
    Jägerskog, Ann-Sofie
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Humanities and Social Sciences Education.
    Jönsson, Fredrik U.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Selander, Staffan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Jonsson, Bert
    Multimedia learning trumps retrieval practice in psychology teaching2019In: Scandinavian Journal of Psychology, ISSN 0036-5564, E-ISSN 1467-9450, Vol. 60, no 3, p. 222-230Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    It is well established that studying with (vs. without) visual illustrations as well as taking tests (vs. restudying) is beneficial for learning, but on which strategy should one put the efforts, or should they be combined for best learning? Eighty-eight upper secondary school students were given a brief lecture presented verbally (6 classes) or with the aid of a visual illustration (visuoverbal, 6 classes). The information was processed again by taking a memory test or by restudying. Recall and transfer tests were conducted after some few minutes and again after one week. The visuoverbal lecture resulted in better learning than verbal presentation only. A significant study strategy by retention interval interaction was found. However, this interaction was not qualified by a testing effect. Hence, taking tests (retrieval practice) did not lead to better learning than restudying. It was concluded that it is worthwhile to use visual illustrations in teaching. However, the present study did not reveal any synergistic effects from the combination of visuoverbal presentation and retrieval practice.

  • 37. Kaiser, Franz
    et al.
    Lindberg, Viveca
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Humanities and Social Sciences Education.
    Vocational teachers in the Swedish and Finnish vocational education systems2019In: Pedagogical concerns and market demands in VET: Proceedings of the 3rd Crossing Boundaries in VET conference, Vocational Education and Training Network (VETNET) / [ed] Fernando Marhuenda, María José Chisvert-Tarazona, Valencia: Publicacions de la Universitat de València, 2019, p. 301-307Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Vocational education in Finland and Sweden has many similarities, including the cultural values of Nordic welfare state action, school based system and VET teachers with a large experiences in working life. In order to examine the similarities and differences at the level of the actors, vocational school teachers from both countries will be analysed with a quantitative survey, based on previous research and expert surveys in the countries. In both countries efforts are currently being made to promote work based learning or apprenticeship models in vocational education and training, which also places changing demands on teachers as well as globalisation, digitalisation and inclusion.

  • 38.
    Karlsson, Per-Arne
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Humanities and Social Sciences Education.
    Learning Trajectory Based Instruction - Plea for a Visible Progression in Teaching and Assessement of Historical Thinking2019In: NOFA7 Abstracts, 2019, p. 116-116Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Progress in research into Teaching and Learning History has produced a paradox and a challenge for history teachers and teacher candidates: the traditional image of a history curriculum overloaded with first order concepts has been supplemented with a large number of second order concepts and expected learning outcomes in terms of procedural knowledge. The USA federal standards describe 468 abilities in US History and 611 abilities in world history and this pattern is reflected in curricula internationally. Will the teacher candidates be able to master all these new concepts, or will they produce an overloaded and fragmented education? To address this challenge in the education of student teachers from 2013-18 I have used a learning trajectory as a framework and guidance for teaching. I suggest the concept of a learning trajectory for building connections between content knowledge and procedural knowledge, with the ultimate aim being a qualified historical thinking. Hypothetically, this concept offers acognitive tool for teaching and learning history with progression. In the paper I discuss the general concept, it's application to teaching history and some preliminary results of investigating the learning processes of teacher candidates in history.

  • 39.
    Kraus, Anja
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Humanities and Social Sciences Education.
    Gender, the Postmodern Paradigm Shift, and Pedagogical Anthropology2019In: Gender in Learning and Teaching: Feminist Dialogues Across International Boundaries / [ed] Carol A. Taylor, Chantal Amade-Escot, Andrea Abbas, Abingdon, Oxon: Routledge, 2019, p. 54-67Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Schools are supposed to impart social values to the younger generation. Thus, it is important that any evaluation of an educational agenda should include sounding out its explicit and implicit ethical underpinnings. This agenda is addressed in this article as an integral part of pedagogical professionality; and gender is one aspect of this fathoming because the current levels of gender inequality are an ethical issue. This chapter discusses the differences it makes to improving gender inequality, if researchers and educators consider gender and pedagogy through the lens of the body-phenomenological approach, which is launched within ‘material feminism’, coined by Stacy Alaimo & Susan Hekman (2008, 3). The educational perspective adopted is that of Pedagogical Anthropology, which has distanced itself from any claim to universality. It refers back to the Enlightenment through an epistemological and social discussion in which it establishes the concept of pedagogical knowledge. This contesting the dominant values that have become contemporaneously associated with researching and evaluating pedagogy in education, instead it focuses knowledge as contextualized and dependent on perspectives and methods; and as a process through which one’s own understandings get related to those of others (Wulf 2003, 143f.).

  • 40.
    Kraus, Anja
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Humanities and Social Sciences Education.
    Transcultural Learning: Emphasizing and De-emphasizing Difference as a Pedagogical Task2019In: Transkulturelle Perspektiven in der Bildung: Transcultural Perspectives in Education / [ed] Gerd-Bodo von Carlsburg, Kiel: Peter Lang Publishing Group, 2019, p. 137-145Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In general, cultural integration and assimilation are demands made of migrants, to be achieved unconditionally with varying levels of social support. This is, in principle, a high educational aim. At times, some migrants are approvingly recognized for their (educational) achievement. More often than not, it is denied them. The concept of transculturalism goes beyond such social expectations, pointing out educational potential that is highly relevant for personality development and societies in transition. In this article we develop, or demarcate, a transcultural notion of education based on a scenario of exile.

  • 41.
    Kraus, Anja
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Humanities and Social Sciences Education.
    A Pedagogy of Cultural Awareness: A Phenomenological Approach to Knowledge and Learning2019In: Transkulturelle Perspektiven in der Bildung: Transcultural Perspectives in Education / [ed] Gerd-Bodo von Carlsburg, Kiel: Peter Lang Publishing Group, 2019, p. 127-135Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The need to grasp constant personal change forms the core of pedagogy. During adolescence personality is in continuous development: the significance of life situations and environments constantly changes; experiences and background knowledge are featured in new discontinuous ways; and personal abilities, subjective motivations and learning goals alter noticeably. Personality development is shaped by the interaction with cultural difference. Cultural awareness not merely concerns relating and comparing abstract contents of one´s own cultural environment to other such environments, but foremost to understand oneself in foreign terms. Subjective and specific factors play a central role in this developmental process. The very task of pedagogy is to accompany, to grasp, and to bring about personal changes. How can pedagogical progress in terms of a personality development be understood as knowledge-based? This contribution argues against the positivistic view of knowledge and knowledge acquisition that currently predominates. Moreover, it argues that subjective and particular factors in pedagogy can be best understood as tacit knowledge. From this backdrop, it reframes some of pedagogy´s conceptual references. In the interest of intellectual rigor, this reframing is achieved utilizing the body-phenomenological perspective on learning.

  • 42.
    Kraus, Anja
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Humanities and Social Sciences Education.
    Bildungsziele und Lehrer*innenbildung in Schweden2019In: Transkulturelle Perspektiven in der Bildung: Transcultural Perspectives in Education / [ed] Gerd-Bodo von Carlsburg, Kiel: Peter Lang Publishing Group, 2019, p. 265-277Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this article, traditional cultural values are discussed in order to explain educational goals and aspects of practical teacher education in Sweden. In a critical examination of the concept of heterogeneity also a suggestion is made as to how the structural and functional logic of institutionalized and organized learning can be analyzed. The investigation refers to an International and Intercultural Comparative Educational Science approach and applies the perspective of Pedagogical Anthropology (Anderson-Levitt 2012).

  • 43.
    Kraus, Anja
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Humanities and Social Sciences Education.
    Transcultural Perspective on Esthetic Education2019In: NOFA7 Abstracts, 2019, p. 121-121Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this paper is to contribute to the elaboration of the transcultural perspective on arts education. My aim is to derive an agenda of transcultural education (aims) by the reflection on artworks, departing from `othering´ as pedagogical concept. In the recent decades, the digital revolution, the flow of capital, combined with waves of migration and with the establishment of powerful transnational communities - such as multinational companies, huge providers of social media, transfer business, etc. - has led to the rise of multiple and hybrid governance, practices and identities (cp. Kontopodis et al. 2017). Hereby, traditional structures of community and local government, for example law, neighborhoods, tax, housing, etc., erode; so for example, entire residential districts are empty as being bought up as yield object by foreign firms, neither subject to national law, nor contributing to neighborhood and taxes. These processes of society of erosion hardly discusses in governmental terms. When it comes to globalization, the focus of public media moreover lies foremost on everyday social interaction, for example in the area of pedagogy. There, the modes of communicating norms and values, the experience of familiarity and unfamiliarity, and social belonging and exclusion are grasped as being undergoing steady change. Culture thus does not anymore only refer to static structures, but it becomes increasingly fractured and contested, leading to diverse forms of heterogeneity and `othering´ (Spivak 1983; Eisenstadt 2000; Waldenfels 2011).

    The term `othering´ has been introduced by Gayatri Spivak in 1985 for signifying the processes by which an imperial discourse produces its subject others. In my paper, I´ll apply this term moreover to the practices of the subordinated.

  • 44.
    Kraus, Anja
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Humanities and Social Sciences Education.
    Bildungsziele und die Lehrer*innenbildung in Schweden2019Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [de]

    Während in der deutschen Bildungsforschung und -politik seit der Jahrtausendwende ein Paradigmenwechsel vom allgemeinen Bildungsziel der Wissensaneignung zu dem des Kompetenzerwerbs vollzogen wurde, wird das Bildungsziel der Kompetenzentwicklung in Schweden in das breite Spektrum der Wissensformen und -formate eingeordnet. In der dem derzeit geltenden Curriculum zugrundegelegten Wissensordnung werden (lebens-)praktische Wissensformen akzentuiert. Synonyme zu förtrogenhet (englisch: familiarity) sind: eine sich einstellende Bekanntheit oder Kenntnis, nahe Bekanntschaft, Vertrautheit, Gewohnheit, Einblick oder Einsicht; es handelt sich dabei um schweigendes Wissen (vgl. Carlgren 2012). Ferner wird an schwedischen Universitäten die Ausbildung von Reflexivität in Bezug auf wissenschaftliche Paradigmen als ein zentrales Qualifikationsziel für Wissenschaftler(innen), etwa im Zusammenhang der Postgraduiertenprogramme auch im Bereich der Fachdidaktik, angesehen. (vgl. högskoleverket 2003, S.21 und Sveriges universitetslärarförbund 2005, S.6ff.) Diese und andere Unterschiede werden in meinem Beitrag auseinandergelegt und auch auf die Kunstpädagogik bezogen.

  • 45.
    Kraus, Anja
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Humanities and Social Sciences Education.
    Friesen, Nrom
    Learning-as-Experience: A Phenomenological Account of Educative Erlebnis2019Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The event of learning is the Achilles heel of the “discourses” or “language[s] of learning” dominant in education today (Meyer-Drawe 2008; Biesta 2012). We have almost no empirical access to or control over this event. It can’t be caused or guaranteed, and its occurrence is visible (if at all) only post facto, e.g. as learning results. For phenomenology, however, learning-as-experience forms a key moment in lived experience (Erlebnis). It appears as something that occurs and can be fostered through the variation of experience known in phenomenology as the epoché or reduction. In describing learning-as-experience, this paper sheds new light on contemporary discourses of learning—from the intricacies of the learning sciences to the effortful learning advocated by the growth mindset. 

  • 46.
    Lidén, Anne
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Humanities and Social Sciences Education.
    Med rak blick: Gun Kessles måleri och grafik på Jan Myrdalbiblioteket i Varberg2019In: En bok om Jan Myrdals och Gun Kessles bibliotek / [ed] Per Axelson, Stockholm: Karneval förlag , 2019Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Artikeln beskriver och diskuterar Gun Kessles konst som är utställd på Jan Myrdalbiblioteket i Varberg. Gun Kessle (1926-2007) härstammar från Haparanda. Utställningen visar konstnärens tidiga verk, måleri och grafik från 1949-1957, från hennes utbildning i Stockholm, på Grafiska Skolan vid Kungl. Konsthögskolan, Hampstead School of Art i London och Gerlesborgsskolan i Bohuslän. I bibliotekets utställning visas även senare teckningar, måleri och grafik samt illustrationer, bokomslag, foton och affischer från hennes talrika resor 1957-2007 tillsammans med Jan Myrdal, bl.a. från Spanien, Afghanistan, Indien och Kina samt Mexico. Gun Kessles omfattande fotografiska verk berörs marginellt i artikeln. Den historiska utvecklingen av olika motiv i Gun Kessles konst behandlas översiktligt och tematiskt.

    Gun Kessle konstsyn utgick mycket från synen på hantverkets betydelse hos Thomas Bewick och William Morris. Gun Kessles konstnärliga förhållningssätt presenteras i relation till konstnärsgruppen de nya expressionisterna på Konsthögskolan på 1950-talet, bl. a. Torsten Renqvist, Svenolov Ehrén och Per-Olof Ultvedt. Hon vill att bilderna skulle vara "tydliga och klara och berättande". Dessutom diskuteras i artikeln olika karaktäriseringar som gjorts av Gun Kessles konst, såsom naivism och realism, humor och berättarglädje. Gun Kessle förde nya bilder till Sverige från sina resor i Asiens länder, bilder av stolta människor utan underdånighet, folk i arbete och gemenskap.

  • 47.
    Lidén, Anne
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Humanities and Social Sciences Education.
    Gun Kessle och Torsten Renqvist: Konstnärer i möten och vägval2019Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Denna forskningsrapport vid HSD forskningsavdelning handlar om de två konstnärerna Gun Kessle (1926-2007) och Torsten Renqvist (1924-2007) och deras konstnärliga utveckling under perioden 1949-1955, baserat på källor och biografiska data ur Gun Kessles efterlämnade minnesanteckningar samt konstvetenskaplig forskning av bl. a. Beate Sydhoff, Lars Nygren och Mailis Stensman. Rapporten behandlar de båda konstnärernas möte vid Österåsens sanatorium och deras gemensamma liv vid Konsthögskolan och Grafiska skolan i Stockholm. Med en konstvetenskaplig analys undersöks främst de skisser och porträtt som Torsten Renqvist gjorde av Gun Kessle med särskild tonvikt på de skisser som låg till grund för en lång rad målningar. Flera av dessa målningar gick förlorade då han senare brände upp dem. En jämförelse görs mellan Gun Kessle och Torsten Renqvist vad gäller deras olika konstnärliga och kulturpolitiska vägval under 1950- och 1960-tal. Rapporten är illustrerad med foton från Gun Kessles samling av grafik och måleri vid Jan Myrdalbiblioteket i Varberg och med foton av Torsten Renqvists verk i Moderna museets samling av teckningar och grafik.  

  • 48.
    Lidén, Anne
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Humanities and Social Sciences Education.
    Pilgrim Tourist Motivations in Religious Heritage, Culture and Art2019In: Spiritual and Religious Tourism: Motivation and Management / [ed] Ruth Dowson, Leeds, UK: CABI editing Co , 2019Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The article is describing the growing development of pilgrim routes in the Scandinavian countries, especially to the city of Trondheim in Norway and to the city of Vadstena in Sweden. In Trondheim pilgrims are visiting the medieval Nidaros Cathedral, the burial place of the martyr king Saint Olav. In Vadstena pilgrims are visiting the medieval Monastery Church, the place of the shrine of Holy Birgitta, Saint Bridget of Sweden. The article gives the historical background to the pilgrimage traditions of these places, the cult of the saints, history, narrative and art, and their significance in tourism today. The revival of the pilgrimage movement in contemporary society is also discussed from personal pilgrim accounts.

    New research is presented that deals with management of the pilgrim routes, pilgrim and heritage tourism today in Norway and Sweden, and how the local organisations provide information and accomodation for visitors. New research in visitors studies regarding the motivations given by the pilgrims and heritage tourists is presented. This new research is discussed from a view of critical heritage studies. The results show that spiritual journeys and pilgrimages have been journeys of hope for good physical and mental health. The contemporary pilgrim and heritage tourist show  individualistic motifs concerning the enjoyment of walking and travelling, but also a deep concern for the natural environment and for protecting the cultural heritage of the places they visit.

  • 49.
    Lidén, Anne
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Humanities and Social Sciences Education.
    Genuspedagogisk bildtolkning och debatt: Det broderade kvinnomärket och andra illustrationer i kvinnorörelsen2019Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Denna forskningsrapport vid forskningsavdelning på HSD ger en summerande genuspedagogisk och konstpedagogisk analys av olika FoU projekt och seminarier i genuspedagogik som bedrivits vid den tidigare institutionen CeHum 2012-2015 under ledning av professor Geir Skeie. Rapporten ger även en kompletterande analys av senare års debatter kring kvinnorörelsens illustrationer, med särskild tonvikt vid det broderade kvinnomärkets användning och bildreception i olika länder. En redogörelse görs av den forskningsdebatt som förts kring det broderade kvinnomärkets betydelse. En jämförelse görs med några av de utvecklingsprojekt i de estetiska ämnenas didaktik som genomförts 2016-2018 vid den efterföljande institutionen HSD.

  • 50.
    Lidén, Anne
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Humanities and Social Sciences Education.
    Fri entré eller ”förhindra en peublemassa att inkomma”?: Det nyöppnade Nationalmuseum och museernas tillgänglighet i backspegeln.2019In: Förr och Nu. Tidskrift för en folkets kultur och historia, no 1, p. 2-15Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [sv]

    Ledarartikeln Fri entré eller "förhindra en peublemassa att inkomma"? tar upp frågan om museer, entréavgift och offentlighetsprincipen i en historisk belysning från Kongl. Museum på Stockholms Slott till det nybyggda Nationalmuseum 1866. Åberopad forskningslitteratur är av bl .a Anna Lena Lindberg, Per Bjurström, Eva Bergström och Solfrid Söderlind. Intendenten L. J. Rööks skrivelse 1845 mot offentligt öppethållande redovisas liksom riksdagens förhållningssätt för offentlighetsprincipen samt F. von Dardels riktlinjer för fri avgift och öppethållande för allmänheten. Dalkullornas betydelse som museivärdar under 1800-och 1900-tal behandlas. Det nyrenoverade Nationalmuseum i Stockholm som återinvigdes 13 okt 2018 och dess nya utställningsrum och samlingar, beskrivs främst utifrån konstpedagogiska aspekter.

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