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  • 1.
    Meister, Lova
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Institute for Interpreting and Translation Studies.
    Ansatser, principer och metoder: En introduktion till metodologi i översättningsvetenskap2020In: Översättningsvetenskap i praktiken: Om översättningar, översättare och översättande / [ed] Elin Svahn, Lova Meister, Stockholm: Morfem , 2020, p. 15-40Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 2.
    Alvstad, Cecilia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Institute for Interpreting and Translation Studies.
    Anthropology over Aesthetics: On the Poetics of Movement and Multilingualism in Three Translations of Yuri Herrera’s Señales que precederán al fin del mundo2020In: Literatura latinoamericana mundial: Dispositivos y disidencias / [ed] Gustavo Guerrero, Jorge J. Locane, Benjamin Loy, Gesine Müller, Walter de Gruyter, 2020, p. 223-241Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 3.
    Tiselius, Elisabet
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Institute for Interpreting and Translation Studies. Sweden & Western Norway University of Applied Sciences, Norway.
    Hägglund, Elisabet
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Institute for Interpreting and Translation Studies.
    Pergert, Pernilla
    Distressful situations, non-supportive work climate, threats to professional and private integrity: Healthcare interpreting in Sweden2020In: Handbook of Research in Medical Interpreting / [ed] Izabel E.T. de V. Souza, Effrossyni Fragkou, Hershey, PA: IGI Global, 2020, p. 54-79Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This chapter describes situations of distress and the working climate of healthcare interpreters in Sweden. A questionnaire focused on distressful situations was administered to interpreters with experience in healthcare interpreting. The results indicated that distress in healthcare interpreting could be traced back to ethically and emotionally challenging interpreting situations and working conditions, and a lack of respect for the interpreters’ work. An interview study using Grounded Theory showed that interpreters’ main concern was the threat to professional and private integrity. Despite the fact that in general the interpreting profession in Sweden may seem professionalized, interpreters struggle with dilemmas connected to less professionalized activities. Our study was conducted in Sweden, but we argue that the results can be generalized to other countries. Although differently organized in different countries, health care interpreters experience similar dilemmas. Equal access to equitable care can be effectively hindered by language barriers.

  • 4.
    Meister, Lova
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Institute for Interpreting and Translation Studies.
    Svahn, Elin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Institute for Interpreting and Translation Studies.
    Förord2020In: Översättningsvetenskap i praktiken: Om översättningar, översättare och översättande / [ed] Elin Svahn, Lova Meister, Stockholm: Morfem , 2020, p. 9-12Chapter in book (Other academic)
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  • 5. Pergert, Pernilla
    et al.
    Tiselius, Elisabet
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Institute for Interpreting and Translation Studies. Karolinska Institutet, Sweden.
    Intercultural competence and communication over language barriers2020In: Ethical issues in pediatric hematology/oncology / [ed] Kate A. Mazur, Stacey L. Berg, Cham: Springer, 2020, p. 203-222Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Intercultural healthcare refers to when people of different cultures and languages communicate and interact in the healthcare context. Intercultural competence is pivotal to provide congruent and meaningful care. The notion intercultural stresses that at least two cultures are involved; however, many use the term cultural. Cultural competence has been described as a process in healthcare interactions and systems, aiming to increase equity and reduce disparities in care. Cultural competence shares core components with patient centered care, but patient centered care is difficult when the values of patients are in conflict with the values of the healthcare professionals and systems. Cultural diversity can lead to conflicts of the most fundamental values and thus, intercultural healthcare requires that professionals have opportunities and skills to deal with value conflicts. We present a relational ethics approach for intercultural competence. The basic ideas of relational ethics, and of intercultural competence, are that they exist in relationships, the context is of importance and true dialogue is the core. The components of intercultural competence are explained and include intercultural dialogue, intercultural reflection and intercultural learning. Furthermore, intercultural communication, i.e. the act of communicating between distinct cultural groups, is pivotal to enable intercultural dialogue and should continuously be developed through intercultural learning in the process of understanding and adapting to the other. We will also discuss professional interpreters’ impact on cultural learning and mutual understanding in the intercultural healthcare context. We argue that healthcare professionals need to learn effective interpreting use as part of intercultural competence.

  • 6.
    Tiselius, Elisabet
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Institute for Interpreting and Translation Studies.
    L’interprète de secteur public en Suède2020In: Traduction et migration: enjeux éthiques et techniques / [ed] Arnold Castelain, Paris: Presses de l'Inalco , 2020, p. 309-324Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The role of the interpreter is understood differently in the Nordic countries compared to, for instance, France. In the Nordic countries, the interpreter’s task is seen as bi-partial, that is, the interpreter should keep equal distance to the two parties present in the conversation (Skaaden, 2016). This article discusses the Swedish public service interpreter’s role, education, requirements and legislation. We start from Wadensjö’s (1998) principle that all participants, including the interpreter, co-construct the meaning of the message through interaction. The legislation surrounding interpreting services in Sweden is founded on the principle that the two parties present in the encounter must understand each other, the public servant and the immigrant have equal needs for an interpreter if they do not share the same language. The author also underlines that there is no contradiction between having access to interpreting services and language learning.

  • 7. Herring, Rachel
    et al.
    Tiselius, Elisabet
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Institute for Interpreting and Translation Studies.
    Making the Most of Retrospective Process Tracing in Dialogue Interpreting Research2020In: FITISPos International Journal Public Service Interpreting and Translation, ISSN 2341-3778, Vol. 7, no 1, p. 53-71Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Retrospective verbal process tracing is a popular research method in Interpreting Studies, employed by a growing number of scholars, particularly in studies of conference interpreting, but, to date, it has not been widely employed in studies of dialogue interpreting. This paper begins by introducing process-tracing methodologies, defining types of verbal process tracing, and presenting a brief critical review of publications employing this research methodology. The bulk of the article provides concrete, practical information and guidance for scholars of dialogue interpreting who are interested in employing retrospective process tracing in their research. We discuss the theoretical underpinnings of the method, methodological considerations that must be taken into account in the design and procedure of such studies, data analysis and reporting on the basis of retrospective process tracing, and recommendations for best practices.

  • 8. Gavioli, Laura
    et al.
    Wadensjö, Cecilia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Institute for Interpreting and Translation Studies.
    Reflections on Doctor Question – Patient Answer Sequences and on Lay Perceptions of Close Translation2020In: Health Communication, ISSN 1041-0236, E-ISSN 1532-7027Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The lay perception of those who work with interpreters in their professional conversations (and sometimes of interpreters themselves) is that translation of what they and their patients/clients say should be as close as possible. The very idea of close translation may seem simple, but the practice of rendering spontaneous talk-in-interaction as close as possible is quite complex, and requires much more from the mediator than textually close renditions. In this paper, we discuss what is involved in the accomplishment of close rendering in talk. We focus on question-answer sequences with clinicians and patients, when details about the patients’ history and their symptoms are collected. We show that meaning is achieved and rendered through processes that may go rather beyond the single words and utterances and that involve the contribution of all the interlocutors. We show three types of sequences taken from a collection of authentic data audio-recorded in health care services in Italy and transcribed to allow for analysis. The sequences show three different forms of talk, found in the data, where participants pursue close, precise rendition of medical details. The analysis highlights that the Italian intercultural mediators (just like those trained and assigned as public service interpreters in other countries), even in these cases which are peculiarly focused on precise details, do need to take responsibility not only for translating the textual items but also for coordinating turns at talk. It is responsible turn-coordination which leads to rendering meaning closely.

  • 9.
    Geiger Poignant, Elisabeth
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Institute for Interpreting and Translation Studies.
    Wadensjö, Cecilia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Institute for Interpreting and Translation Studies.
    To re-present a Nobel prize winner: Interpreting a public literary conversation2020In: Multimodal Communication, ISSN 2230-6579, E-ISSN 2230-6587, Vol. 9, no 1Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article examines the unfolding of interaction in a growing and, so far, scarcely examined social and cultural practice – interpreter-mediated public literary conversations. In this context, the activity of interpreters, although indispensable when authors and audiences do not share a common language, is sometimes regarded as a “necessary evil” that allegedly causes delays and information loss. Exploring an interpreter-mediated public literary conversation with Nobel Laureate Svetlana Alexievich as a case in point, the focus of this article is rather on what the presence of an interpreter might add to the shared performance on stage. Attention is drawn to the temporal evolvement of the interlocutor’s communicative resources, evident within narrative sequences, drawing on prosody research (Auer, 1999; Couper-Kuhlen, 1999, 2007) and research on gestures (Kendon, e.g. 2000; Streek, 2007; McNeill 2008). The study suggests that, apart from keeping the non-Russian speaking audience updated on content, the interpreter’s rhythmically calibrated performance adds an energizing asset to the event as a whole. The notion of the “coupled turn”, internally hosting gestural and prosodic coherence across topical boundaries and language frame shifts, emerges as a usable unit for the analysis.

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  • 10.
    Svahn, Elin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Institute for Interpreting and Translation Studies.
    Vad vi pratar om när vi pratar om översättning: En tematisk analys av ett fokusgruppsamtal med nyblivna översättarstudenter2020In: Översättningsvetenskap i praktiken: Om översättningar, översättare och översättande / [ed] Elin Svahn, Lova Meister, Stockholm: Morfem , 2020, p. 133-162Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [sv]

    I den här artikeln undersöks hur en grupp nyblivna översättarstudenter ser på översättning med utgångspunkt i ett översättningssociologiskt ramverk. Syftet är att visa hur ett socialt och temporalt kontextualiserat översättningsbegrepp (concept of translation) kan konstrueras utifrån ett fokusgruppsamtal. Fokusgruppsamtalet spelades in tre månader efter att studenterna hade påbörjat sina studier och analyserades induktivt genom tematisk analys enligt Braun & Clarkes (2006) modell. Analysen resulterade i fyra övergripande teman: 1) översättning är allmängiltigt – översättning är kontextspecifikt, 2) översättning är socialt – översättning är individuellt, 3) översättning är teoretiskt – översättning är praktiskt och 4) översättning är osynligt. Dessutom tillkommer tre teman om vad översättnig enligt studenterna inte är: översättning är inte tolkning, översättning är inte (bara) språkkunskaper och översättning är inte (bara) fackkunskaper. Resultatet visar att studenternas syn på översättnig kan kopplas till fem sociala kontexter som de på olika sätt relaterar till: det svenska samhället, allmänheten, språkutbildningen, översättarutbildningen och översättaryrket.

  • 11.
    Svahn, Elin
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Institute for Interpreting and Translation Studies.
    Meister, LovaStockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Institute for Interpreting and Translation Studies.
    Översättningsvetenskap i praktiken: Om översättningar, översättare och översättande2020Collection (editor) (Refereed)
    Abstract [sv]

    Det har länge saknats kurslitteratur i översättningsvetenskaplig metod som är skriven på svenska. Översättningsvetenskap i praktiken är tänkt att fylla det tomrummet och fungera som en introduktion såväl på översättarutbildningar och forskarutbildningar i översättningsvetenskap som på översättningsinriktade kurser inom ramen för enskilda språkämnen.

    Här kan du att vässa din förmåga till metodologisk analys, inspireras av aktuell översättningsvetenskaplig forskning och få verktyg för att skapa en stringent vetenskaplig studie.

  • 12.
    Solberg, Ida Hove
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Institute for Interpreting and Translation Studies.
    An ideological war: The politics of translation in occupied Norway (1940–1945)2019In: EST Congress 2019: Living Translation: Book of Abstracts, 2019, p. 208-208Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Recent research has drawn attention to the roles of translators and translation during wartime in countries such as Belgium (Gouanvic 2001), Germany (Rundle & Sturge 2010) and France (Lombez 2013; 2016; 2017). This paper presents the first research on translation during the Nazi occupation of Norway (1940–1945).

    Findings from research in newly opened archives shows how the publication of translated literature came to be controlled during the occupation by regulations implemented by German officials in Norway. In 1941 the “department for culture and enlightenment”, a propaganda department established by Nazi officials, demanded that Norwegian publishing houses ask permission for each translated book they wanted to publish, a time-consuming and costly process. The archives reveal obvious instances of censorship, but they also show several instances of the authorities pushing books to translate. Some publishing houses highlight in their applications that they have been urged by the Reichskommissariat to publish certain works.

    By asking how the policies, processes and regulations of translation of literature were in this period, and how translators, publishers and Nazi officials interacted with each other in order to publish translated works, this paper gives insight into the politics of translation during Nazi occupation, as well as the ethical challenges of navigating regulations set by antidemocratic authorities – or, for some, profiting from them.

    The flow (or lack of such) of foreign literature in a country occupied by a foreign power does not only indicate the attitudes towards, and conditions for, translation under a given regime. It also yields insight into how this power could use censorship and withholding of translated literature on one hand, and pushing certain kinds of translated literature on the other, as means in the fight to win the ideological war, as Lombez (2016) has argued was the case in occupied France.

  • 13.
    Solberg, Ida Hove
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Institute for Interpreting and Translation Studies.
    An ideological war: The politics of translation in occupied Norway (1940–45)2019In: Abstracts/Résumés/Abstracts: Plenary Presentations/Conférences plénières/Conferenze plenarie, 2019, p. 36-37Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Recent research has drawn attention to the roles of translators and translation during wartime in countries such as Belgium (Gouanvic 2001), Germany (Rundle & Sturge 2010) and France (Lombez 2013; 2016; 2017). This paper presents the first research on translation during the Nazi occupation of Norway (1940–1945). Findings from research in newly opened archives shows how the publication of translated literature came to be controlled during the occupation by regulations implemented by German officials in Norway. In 1941 the “department for culture and enlightenment”, a propaganda department established by the Nazi officials, demanded that Norwegian publishing houses ask permission for each translated book they wanted to publish, a both time-consuming and costly process. The archives reveal obvious instances of censorship of literature in translation, but they also show several instances of the authorities pushing books, as some of the publishing houses highlight in their applications that they have been asked by the Reichskommissariat to publish certain translations. By asking how the policies, processes and regulations of translation of literature were in this period, and how translators, publishers and Nazi officials interacted with each other in order to publish translated works, this paper gives insight into the politics of translation during Nazi occupation, as well as the ethical challenges of navigating regulations set by antidemocratic authorities– or, for some, profiting from them. The flow (or lack of such) of foreign literature in a country occupied by aforeign power does not only indicate the attitudes towards, and conditions for, translation under a givenregime. It also yields insight into how this power could use censorship and withholding of translated literatureon one hand and to push certain kinds of translated literature on the other, as means in the fight to win theideological war, as Lombez (2016) has argued was the case in occupied France.

  • 14.
    Tiselius, Elisabet
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Institute for Interpreting and Translation Studies.
    Englund Dimitrova, Birgitta
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Institute for Interpreting and Translation Studies.
    Asymmetrical language proficiency in dialogue interpreters: Methodological issues2019In: Translation, Cognition and Behaviour, ISSN 2542-5277, Vol. 2, no 2, p. 305-322Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Language proficiency of dialogue interpreters, who typically work in the public service sector, is an under-researched area. Contrary to conference interpreters, for dialogue interpreters there is no generally accepted definition of proficiency levels of working languages. This article discusses language proficiency in dialogue interpreting. It presents a methodological problem, namely, how to define and determine a given interpreter’s stronger and weaker working language. In our article we discuss different methods for determining the individual interpreter’s stronger and weaker working languages, such as self-assessment, demographic, socio-linguistic questionnaire and test score (Dialang). We conclude that there is a need for more research into this area.

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    Tiselius Englund Dimitrova 2019
  • 15.
    Englund Dimitrova, Birgitta
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Institute for Interpreting and Translation Studies.
    Changing Footings on 'Jacob's Ladder': dealing with sensitive issues in dual-role mediation on a Swedish TV-show2019In: Perspectives: studies in translatology, ISSN 0907-676X, E-ISSN 1747-6623, Vol. 27, no 5, p. 718-731Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This case study examines a Swedish TV interview with a Soviet pop singer in 1985 where the talk show host, who is both a trained interpreter and an experienced media journalist, acts as a dual-role mediator, interviewing and interpreting at the same time. The analysis is contextualized within the political and military relations between Sweden and the USSR in the 1980s. Theoretically, the study draws on ethics of interpreting, ethics of entertainment and the notions participation status or footing. A potential challenge for a dual-role mediator is that two different ethical stances are involved; here, ethics of entertainment (entertainment, comfort, culture value orientation) and ethics of interpreting (impartiality, neutrality, accuracy). These may clash, but the study claims that the different stances can also be used to the participants’ advantage. Here, the role of talk show host dominates over the role of interpreter, and interpreting ethics can be flouted and played with if it suits the purposes of the former. The study shows the complexity of dual-role mediation and emphasizes the need to take into account the perspectives of both of the involved roles in research on participants’ interaction and changes of footing.

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  • 16.
    Alvstad, Cecilia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Institute for Interpreting and Translation Studies.
    Children’s Literature2019In: The Routledge Handbook of Literary Translation / [ed] Kelly Washbourne, Ben Van Wyke, Routledge, 2019, p. 159-180Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Adults as well both can and do read children's literature, either together with children or without them, just like children and young adults can read diverse literary materials targeting adults. The origins of children's literature are often traced back to early modern educational books for boys and girls that taught religious virtues and good manners to the upper classes. Some kinds of topics are by many adults deemed to be especially difficult for children to deal with, such as books culminating in a suicide, since such a denouement would leave the reader without any hope for a change for the better. After some initial reflections on the translation of children's literature as a performative and multimodal practice, the chapter presents a series of examples of typical interventions that take place in the translation of children's literature regarding violence, religion, racism and sexuality.

  • 17.
    Pedersen, Jan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Institute for Interpreting and Translation Studies.
    Fansubbing in subtitling land: An investigation into the nature of fansubs in Sweden2019In: Target, ISSN 0924-1884, E-ISSN 1569-9986, Vol. 31, no 1, p. 50-76Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Fansubs (subtitles made by fans for fans) have become a global practice, and it is by now a fairly well-described phenomenon, particularly for fansubs of Japanese anime. However, for Sweden, which has a long and strong tradition of prosubs (commissioned professional subtitles), there have hardly been any studies of this increasingly prolific phenomenon. This paper seeks to remedy this situation by investigating 16 subtitled versions of ten english-language films. The analysis uses the FAR model of quality assessment and also investigates other aspects, such as creativity. The results show that there is great variety between the various fansubbed versions. On average, Swedish fansubs are found to be of lower quality, less adhering to norms and also more abusively faithful than prosubs. Moreover, the fansubs in this study are hardly creative at all. This could be due to fansubbing being a rather marginal phenomenon in Sweden, the land of subtitling.

  • 18.
    Bendegard, Saga
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Institute for Interpreting and Translation Studies.
    Landqvist, Hans
    Nissilä, Niina
    Pilke, Nina
    ”Förslagsvis kunde en ren översättning av de tyska uttrycken användas”: Fackexperter, språkexperter och terminologiska frågor i Sverige 1941–19832019In: Svenskans beskrivning 36: Förhandlingar vid trettiosjätte sammankomsten, Uppsala 25–27 oktober 2017 / [ed] Marco Bianchi, David Håkansson, Björn Melander, Linda Pfister, Maria Westman, Carin Östman, Uppsala: Uppsala universitet, 2019, p. 23-35Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 19.
    Tiselius, Elisabet
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Institute for Interpreting and Translation Studies. Western Norway University of Applied Sciences, Norway.
    Albl-Mikasa, Michaela
    Introduction: Cognitive processes in dialogue interpreting2019In: Translation, Cognition & Behaviour, ISSN 2542-5277, Vol. 2, no 2, p. 233-239Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 20. Greenall, Annjo K.
    et al.
    Alvstad, Cecilia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Institute for Interpreting and Translation Studies.
    Jansen, Hanne
    Taivalkoski-Shilov, Kristiina
    Introduction: voice, ethics and translation2019In: Perspectives: studies in translatology, ISSN 0907-676X, E-ISSN 1747-6623, Vol. 27, no 5, p. 639-647Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Although previous research on ethics demonstrates growing awareness that many agents or subjectivities besides translators and interpreters are involved in translation and interpreting processes, the consequences of this multiplicity for thinking about ethics in translation still lacks focused attention. In this introduction, we show how this special issue, titled Voice, Ethics and Translation, reduces this gap by highlighting the concept of voice and the idea that the world of translating and interpreting consists of many voices ‘having a say’. This carries with it the potential for negotiation, conflict and dissent regarding what constitutes good and bad translation and interpreting practice. The nine contributions discuss questions such as whose voices are involved in ethical negotiations, what is the nature of these negotiations, who has more power to have their voices heard, and whether translators and interpreters should be given more trust and responsibility. As evinced by these various contributions, a consensus seems to be emerging to the effect that rather than blindly following outside authorities in ethical matters, translators and interpreters need to be encouraged to independently reflect on a variety of voices on ethics and be actively conscientious and responsible in actual translation and interpreting situations.

  • 21.
    Englund Dimitrova, Birgitta
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Institute for Interpreting and Translation Studies.
    ’Jag tror den kommer från himlen’: En fallstudie av kognitiv belastning i TV-tolkning2019In: Slavica antiqua et hodierna: en hyllningsskrift till Per Ambrosiani / [ed] Elisabeth Löfstrand, Alexander Pereswetoff-Morath, Ewa Teodorowicz-Hellman, Stockholm: Stockholms universitet, Institutionen för slaviska och baltiska språk, finska, nederländska och tyska, Slaviska språk , 2019, p. 235-250Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper is a case study of cognitive load in consecutive interpreting. The data is taken from an example of dual role mediation in an entertainment show on Swedish TV, where the host interviews a Russian-speaking guest while at the same time functioning as interpreter for the Swedish viewers.  The assumption of the study is that performing such double functions is cognitively taxing and may lead to cognitive overload, affecting the interpreting process. Methodologically, the study uses multimodal conversation analysis for the analysis of utterances in combination with non-verbal elements (gaze, hand movements). This analysis from a micro perspective is embedded within a macro perspective analysis where elements of thick description serve to contextualize the situation in order to tentatively explain some problems in the interpreting process and the strategies used to solve them.

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  • 22.
    Wadensjö, Cecilia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Institute for Interpreting and Translation Studies.
    Jemina Napier, Robert Skinner and Sabine Braun (Eds.). Here or there: Research on interpreting via video link2019In: Interpreting, ISSN 1384-6647, E-ISSN 1569-982X, Vol. 21, no 2, p. 305-309Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 23.
    Solberg, Ida Hove
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Institute for Interpreting and Translation Studies.
    Mitt minimalistiske bibliotek2019In: Bokvennen litterær avis (BLA), ISSN 2464-3971, no 8, p. 30-31Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 24.
    Solberg, Ida Hove
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Institute for Interpreting and Translation Studies.
    One is not born, but rather becomes, Simone de Beauvoir: Translation and reception of Beauvoir and Le deuxième sexe in Norway2019Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    By presenting the two Norwegian translations of Le deuxième sexe (1949), as well as an overview of how Simone de Beauvoir’s author image changed over time in interplay with the translations, this paper gives an account of the translational history of this seminal work in Norway. The intra-Scandinavian travels of the text, i.e. the international exchange which influenced particularly the first Scandinavian translations, are also addressed.

    The aim of the paper is to shed light on the various Norwegian ideas of ‘Beauvoir’ and her most famous work by answering the following questions: What characterizes the feminist classic Le deuxième sexe in its first translation into Norwegian in 1970? Why was the work (re)translated? In what ways does the (re)translation from 2000 differ from the first translation? How did the sociohistorical context, other publications by or about Beauvoir and textual features of the two translations affect the image of the author, and vice versa? 

    The first Norwegian translation of Le deuxième sexe, a severely abridged version, translated by the feminist activist Rønnaug Eliassen at the threshold of Norway’s second feminist wave is analyzed in contrast to the un-abridged (re)translation, translated by the highly professional translator of Beauvoir, Bente Christensen, complemented with a foreword by Beauvoir scholar Toril Moi. Upon the basis of the analysis of these versions of Le deuxième sexe in Norwegian, this paper explores how these translations may have both reflected and contributed to shaping how Beauvoir was depicted in the printed press across recent history (1940s–2010s). 

  • 25.
    Wadensjö, Cecilia
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Institute for Interpreting and Translation Studies.
    Chrystal, Judith
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism.
    Skolans flerspråkiga personal som tolkresurs i kartläggningssamtal om litteracitet2019In: Klassrumsforskning och språk(ande): Rapport från ASLA-symposiet i Karlstad, 12–13 april, 2018 / [ed] Birgitta Ljung Egeland, Tim Roberts, Erica Sandlund, Pia Sundqvist, Karlstad: Karlstads universitet, 2019, 1, p. 43-60Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [sv]

    I denna artikel redogör vi för några utmaningar som parterna ställs inför i kartläggningssamtal med nyanlända elever där flerspråkig skolpersonal fått i uppdrag att tolka. Analyser av transkriberade och översatta sekvenser ur fem videoinspelade samtal visar att den flerspråkiga skolpersonalens pedagogiska kompetens i mycket liten utsträckning utnyttjas under samtalen och att deras avsaknad av tolkkompetens kan begränsa elevens möjligheter att visa sina kunskaper. Det får konsekvenser inte enbart i form av att elevens svar kan komma att återges på ett missvisande sätt utan även genom att kartläggarens samspel med eleven påverkas.

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    Wadensjö & Chrystal 2019
  • 26.
    Malmgård, Sofia
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism.
    Azbel Schmidt, Morena
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Institute for Interpreting and Translation Studies.
    Sveriges språkflora: Handbok för ett flerspråkigt samhälle2019Book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [sv]

    Det talas smånga språk i Sverige idag, med de flesta av oss vet nästan ingenting om merparten av dem. Kan man se skillnad på arabiska och persiska? Åt vilket håll skrivs somaliska? Var talar man (ny)arameiska? Talas samma teckenspråk överallt i världen?

    I den här boken presenteras fakta om drygt 40 av de språk som talas i Sverige, tillsammans med information om översättning, tolkning, flerspråkighet och språkpolitik. Det handlar förstås om invandringsspråken, men också om de främmande språk vi lär oss i skolan och om de nationella minoritetsspråken. Det finns många goda skäl att öka sina kunskaper om språken. Om du är till exempel läkare eller lärare och ska beställa tolk kan du behöva veta vilka språk som talas i Eritrea eller om kurdiska är ett språk eller flera. Du som är kommunikatör eller formgivare och ska arbeta med informationsinsatser på olika språk kan behöva känna till hur man undviker praktiska misstag när man hanterar språk med annan skrivriktning än vänster till höger elller annan teckenuppsättning än den latinska.

    Det här är en handbok för den som arbetar i det flerspråkiga Sverige. Men det är också en bok för den som bara är road av språk i största allmänhet och intresserad av den svenska språkfloran.

  • 27. Granhagen Jungner, Johanna
    et al.
    Tiselius, Elisabet
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Institute for Interpreting and Translation Studies. Karolinska Institutet, Sweden.
    Blomgren, Klas
    Lützén, Kim
    Pergert, Pernilla
    The interpreter's voice: Carrying the bilingual conversation in interpreter-mediated consultations in pediatric oncology care2019In: Patient Education and Counseling, ISSN 0738-3991, E-ISSN 1873-5134, Vol. 102, no 4, p. 656-662Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: The objective of this study was to explore interpreters' perceived strategies in the interaction in interpreter-mediated consultations between healthcare personnel and patients/families with limited Swedish proficiency in pediatric oncology care. Methods: This study had an inductive approach using an exploratory qualitative design. A total of eleven semi-structured interviews were performed with interpreters who had experience interpreting in pediatric oncology care. Results: The interpreters' perceived strategies were divided into four generic categories; strategies for maintaining a professional role, strategies for facilitating communication, strategies for promoting collaboration, and strategies for improving the framework of interpreting provision. These four generic categories were then merged into the single main category of carrying the bilingual conversation. Conclusions: The interpreters stretch their discretionary power in order to carry the bilingual conversation by using strategies clearly outside of their assignment. Practical implications: The study contributes to the understanding of the interpreter-mediated consultation in pediatric oncology care, and this can be used to improve the care of patients and families in pediatric oncology care with limited knowledge of a country's majority language.

  • 28.
    Alvstad, Cecilia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Institute for Interpreting and Translation Studies.
    The Proliferating Paths of Jorge Luis Borges’ Work in Translation and the Resistance to an Innovative Trait2019In: Translation and World Literature / [ed] Susan Bassnett, Routledge, 2019, p. 144-158Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This chapter focuses on a few selected translations of Borges literary prose, showing that Borges translators have chosen different paths, and that these are not always reconcilable one with the other. In the story, a Chinese agent working for the Germans in World War I is about to kill a random British citizen named Albert. All the versions, along with scholarly studies on Borges, talks with friends and colleagues, and research visits to the Centro Cultural Borges and the Museo Borges in Buenos Aires are sure to have influenced literature present idea of Borges' literary heritage. Butler and Boldy are clearly discussing the same story and the same sentences here, but the difference between their two readings is striking. Innovative metafiction was also changed into more traditional forms in other Swedish translations of the work of Latin American writers in the 1960s.

  • 29.
    Tiselius, Elisabet
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Institute for Interpreting and Translation Studies. Wester Norway University of Applied Sciences, Norway.
    The (un-) ethical interpreting researcher: ethics, voice and discretionary power in interpreting research2019In: Perspectives: studies in translatology, ISSN 0907-676X, E-ISSN 1747-6623, Vol. 27, no 5, p. 747-760Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article discusses different aspects of research ethics, the researcher’s voice and discretionary power in interpreting studies. Research ethics is laid down in international conventions, which in turn are reflected in national regulations and ethical vetting. Discretionary power is understood as the leeway for making conscientious decisions within the rules and regulations governing a certain field. Although research ethics in interpreting has as yet received little scholarly attention, it is important that the field discusses aspects such as informed consent and the collection, analysis and reporting of data. This article uses three case studies to discuss how researchers can handle such ethical issues. Interpreting researchers often are or have been active interpreters, and this is yet another potential challenge for the field. Such duality potentially means that the researcher needs to navigate two ethical systems, that of the interpreter and that of the researcher – systems that may come into conflict with each other. It may also entail the risk of the researcher’s voice taking over the participants’ narrative.

  • 30.
    Solberg, Ida Hove
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Institute for Interpreting and Translation Studies.
    Å avkolonisere akademia: Tonje Vold, Å lese verden. Fra imperieblikk og postkolonialisme til verdenslitteratur og økokritikk2019In: Bokvennen litterær avis (BLA), ISSN 2464-3971, no 11-12, p. 38-39Article, book review (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 31.
    Lindqvist, Yvonne
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Institute for Interpreting and Translation Studies.
    Bibliomigrationsmönster från periferi till semiperiferi: Om den samtida spanskkaribiska litteraturen i svensk översättning2018In: Tidskrift för litteraturvetenskap, ISSN 1104-0556, E-ISSN 2001-094X, Vol. 1, no 2, p. 90-104Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of the article Bibliomigration from Periphery to (Semi)Periphery is threefold: firstly to describe the bibliomigration patterns of the Contemporary Spanish Caribbean Literature to Sweden, secondly to test the Double Consecration Hypothesis, and thirdly to discuss the importance of translation in relation to World Literature. The material studied consists of 25 novels written by 15 Spanish Caribbean authors from Cuba, Puerto Rico and the Dominican Republic translated into Swedish during the period 1990–2015. The consecration processes of the involved cosmopolitan intermediaries in the study are reconstructed in order to map out the bibliomigration. It was brought to light that the Spanish literary consecration culture is pluri-centric and the Anglo American duo-centric, which ultimately affect the bibliomigration patterns to Sweden. Three patterns were discovered: One for Spanish Caribbean authors who writes in Spanish, one for Spanish Caribbean authors writing in English and one for literature written in Spanish, published in Spanish in Sweden and then translated into Swedish. In the first case nine out of then novels verified the Double Consecration Hypothesis. Hence it seems that Spanish Caribbean literature written in Spanish have to be consecrated primarily within the Spanish colonial and postcolonial literary centers and then within the American and British consecration centers in order to be selected for translation into Swedish. In the second case ten out of the 25 Spanish Caribbean novels were written in English, and thus not in need for double consecration to reach Sweden. In the last pattern consecration is local rather than cosmopolitan.

  • 32.
    Svahn, Elin
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Institute for Interpreting and Translation Studies.
    Ruokonen, Minna
    Salmi, Leena
    Boundaries Around, Boundaries Within: Introduction to the Thematic Section on the Translation Profession, Translator Status and Identity2018In: Hermes - Journal of Language and Communication in Business, ISSN 1903-1785, no 58, p. 7-17Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The articles in this thematic section all address questions concerning the translation profession, translator status and identity in ways that are associated with the concept of boundaries. The ar-ticles are based on presentations held at a panel on translator status and identity during the 8th Congress of the European Society for Translation Studies (EST), organised at Aarhus University, in September 2016. The panel and the present thematic section comprise a continuation of the dis-cussion of these themes in the previous EST Congress and in the thematic issue of The Journal of Specialised Translation titled “The translation profession: centres and peripheries” (2016), edited by Helle Vrønning Dam and Kaisa Koskinen. In this introduction, we first discuss the concept of boundaries around and within the transla-tion profession as introduced by Dam/Koskinen in the above-mentioned thematic issue. Next, as all the articles in this thematic section represent sociological research into translation and transla-tors, we draw attention to boundary work within the discipline of Translation Studies; building on Andrew Chesterman’s (2006, 2009) map of Translator Studies, we propose a continuum of Socio-logical vs. Cultural Translator Studies. Finally, we introduce the articles, considering the kinds of boundaries they explore and where they are placed on the continuum.

  • 33.
    Englund Dimitrova, Birgitta
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Institute for Interpreting and Translation Studies.
    Ehrensberger-Dow, Maureen
    Cognitive space: exploring the situational interface2018In: Exploring the Situational Interface of Translation and Cognition / [ed] Maureen Ehrensberger-Dow, Birgitta Englund Dimitrova, Amsterdam: John Benjamins Publishing Company, 2018, p. 1-18Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 34. Orero, Pilar
    et al.
    Doherty, Stephen
    Kruger, Jan-Louis
    Matamala, Anna
    Pedersen, Jan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Institute for Interpreting and Translation Studies.
    Perego, Elisa
    Romero-Fresco, Pablo
    Rovira-Esteva, Sara
    Soler-Vilageliu, Olga
    Szarkowska, Agnieszka
    Conducting experimental research in audiovisual translation (AVT): A position paper2018In: Journal of Specialised Translation, ISSN 1740-357X, E-ISSN 1740-357X, no 30, p. 105-126Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Experimental studies on AVT have grown incrementally over the past decade. This growing body of research has explored several aspects of AVT reception and production using behavioural measures such as eye tracking, as well as venturing into physiological measures such as electroencephalography (EEG), galvanic skin response, and heart rate. As a novel approach to the field of AVT, the experimental approach has borrowed heavily from other fields with established experimental traditions, such as psycholinguistics, psychology, and cognitive science. However, these methodologies are often not implemented with the same rigour as in the disciplines from which they were taken, making for highly eclectic and, at times, inconsistent practices. The absence of a common framework and best practice for experimental research in AVT poses significant risk in addition to the potential reputational damage. Some of the most important risks are: the duplication of efforts, studies that cannot be replicated due to a lack of methodological standardisation and rigour, and findings that are, at best, impossible to generalise from and, at worst, invalid. Given the growing body of work in AVT taking a quasi-experimental approach, it is time to consolidate our position and establish a common framework in order to ensure the integrity of our endeavours. This chapter analyses problems and discusses solutions specifically related to the multidisciplinary nature of experimental AVT research. In so doing, it aims to set the course for future experimental research in AVT, in order to gain credibility in the wider scientific community and contributes new insights to the fields from which AVT has been borrowing. Its conclusion lays out the foundation for a common core of measures and norms to regulate research in the growing field of AVT.

  • 35.
    Tiselius, Elisabet
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Institute for Interpreting and Translation Studies.
    Deliberate practice: The unicorn of interpreting studies2018In: Translation – Didaktik – Kompetenz / [ed] Barbara Ahrens, Silvia Hansen-Schirra, Monika Krein-Kühle, Michael Schreiber, Ursula Wienen, Berlin: Frank & Timme, 2018, p. 131-144Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Deliberate practice, as described in expertise theory of cognitive psychology, stems, at least in part, from Ericsson, Krampe and Tesch-Römer’s seminal 1993 study of violin students from the Music Academy of West Berlin. In their article, Ericsson et al. take issue with the belief that truly exceptional performers are unique because they possess different types of innate giftedness. They say such reasoning is oversimplified and suggest that a truly scientific account of such skills would have to describe the development leading up to exceptional performance, as well as the “genetic and acquired characteristics that mediate it” (1993: 363, italics added). Furthermore, they argue that a scientific mapping of exceptional performance must identify critical differences between exceptional and ordinary performers. And, finally, they suggest that when researchers argue that there are genetic differences, those differences must be proven to be genetically heritable as being hereditary. Because it would be difficult for researchers to provide this evidence, Ericsson et al. recommend researchers investigate environmental factors that could “selectively promote and facilitate the achievement of such performance” instead (1993: 363). Based on their research, Ericsson et al. suggest one crucial environmental factor is deliberate practice.

    Of course, the issue of deliberate practice is not without controversy. One of the main counterarguments to Ericsson et al.’s proposal is that even if practice is important, researchers cannot rule out the contribution of ability factors. Some have suggested it is unfair to less able individuals to claim that hard work is enough to achieve excellence (Detterman 2014). Furthermore, several studies have shown that deliberate practice is a weak explanation of the variance in performance in many areas (Macnamara, Hambrick and Oswald 2014; Menz and Hambrick, 2010). Ericsson counters these studies by stating that the structure of expert performance is so unique it “cannot be extrapolated from the performance–ability relations observed in the general adult population” (Ericsson 2014: 81).

    Deliberate practice in interpreting poses another challenge for the researcher because the few studies done on the construct in this field have failed to show the mere occurrence (let alone the effect) of deliberate practice in interpreting (Tiselius 2013; Albl-Mikasa 2013). It is possible that interpreting researchers cannot find an effect for deliberate practice because they have incorrectly defined the construct. Alternatively, deliberate practice in interpreting may be a unicorn: a noble creature with the power to redeem novice interpreters be they only pure, which unfortunately exists only in fairy tales. With only two studies in the field, we do not have sufficient evidence to decide whether deliberate practice is an unproven fact or only a fiction.

    This article describes the theoretical foundations of deliberate practice, differences between practice and deliberate practice, and how the construct has been studied in the fields of cognitive psychology broadly and interpreting specifically. It will also investigate criticisms of deliberate practice in the field.

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  • 36. Granhagen Jungner, Johanna
    et al.
    Tiselius, Elisabet
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Institute for Interpreting and Translation Studies. Karolinska Institutet, Sweden.
    Wenemark, Marika
    Blomgren, Klas
    Lützén, Kim
    Pergert, Pernilla
    Development and evaluation of the Communication over Language Barriers questionnaire (CoLB-q) in paediatric healthcare2018In: Patient Education and Counseling, ISSN 0738-3991, E-ISSN 1873-5134, Vol. 101, no 9, p. 1661-1668Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To develop a valid and reliable questionnaire addressing the experiences of healthcare personnel of communicating over language barriers and using interpreters in paediatric healthcare. Methods: A multiple- methods approach to develop and evaluate the questionnaire, including focus groups, cognitive interviews, a pilot test and test-retest. The methods were chosen in accordance with questionnaire development methodology to ensure validity and reliability. Results: The development procedure showed that the issues identified were highly relevant to paediatric healthcare personnel and resulted in a valid and reliable Communication over Language Barriers questionnaire (CoLB-q) with 27 questions. Conclusion: The CoLB-q is perceived as relevant, important and easy to respond to by respondents and has satisfactory validity and reliability.& nbsp; Practice implications: The CoLB-q can be used to map how healthcare personnel overcome language barriers through communication tools and to identify problems encountered in paediatric healthcare. Furthermore, the transparently described process could be used as a guide for developing similar questionnaires.

  • 37.
    Tiselius, Elisabet
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Institute for Interpreting and Translation Studies. Western Norway University of Applied Sciences, Norway.
    Exploring cognitive aspects of competence in signed language interpreting: First impressions2018In: Hermes - Journal of Language and Communication Studies, ISSN 0904-1699, E-ISSN 1903-1785, no 57, p. 49-61Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Sign language interpreting of dialogues shares many features with the interpreting of dialogues between non-signed languages. We argue that from a cognitive perspective in dialogue interpreting, despite some differences between the two types of interpreting, sign language interpreters use many of the same processes and handle similar challenges as interpreters between non-signed languages. We report on a first exploration of process differences in sign language interpreting between three novice and three experienced Swedish Sign Language interpreters. The informants all interpreted the same dialogue and made a retrospection of their interpreting immediately after the task. Retrospections were analyzed using tools for identifying reported processing problems, instances of monitoring, and strategy use (see Ivanova 1999). Furthermore, the interpreting products (both into Swedish Sign Language and into Swedish) and their differences were qualitatively analyzed. The results indicate that there are differences between the two groups, both in terms of the retrospective reports and in terms of the interpreting product. As expected, monitoring seems to be a factor determined by experience. The experienced interpreters seemed to have more efficient ways of handling turn taking and the internalization of new vocabulary. The study also concludes that to use instruments devised for simultaneous conference interpreting (Ivanova 1999; Tiselius 2013), the instruments need to be adapted to the dialogue setting, even though in the case of sign language interpreting the simultaneous interpreting technique is used even in dialogue interpreting.

  • 38. Ehrensberger-Dow, Maureen
    et al.
    Englund Dimitrova, Birgitta
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Institute for Interpreting and Translation Studies.
    Exploring the Situational Interface of Translation and Cognition2018Book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The contributions of this volume explore the dynamics of the interface between the cognitive and situational levels in translation and interpreting. Until relatively recently, there has been an invisible line in translation and interpreting studies between cognitive research (e.g., into mental processes or attitudes) and sociological research (e.g., concerning organization, status, or institutions). However, rapid developments in translation and interpreting practices (professional, non-professional) have brought to the fore the need to rethink theoretical perspectives and to apply new research methods. The chapters in this volume aim to contribute to this discussion through conceptual and/or empirical research. Drawing on different theoretical and methodological frameworks, they offer insights into diverse translation and interpreting situations, in a number of different countries and cultures, and their consequences for individual and collective cognition. Originally published as special issue of Translation Spaces 5:1 (2016).

  • 39.
    Pedersen, Jan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Institute for Interpreting and Translation Studies.
    From old tricks to Netflix: How local are interlingual subtitling norms for streamed television?2018In: Journal of Audiovisual Translation, ISSN 2617-9148, Vol. 1, no 1, p. 81-100Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Like other translation norms, interlingual subtitling norms for television evolve over time, influenced by technology, mediascape development and other trends. Originating in cinema subtitling norms, TV subtitling norms began to develop at national public service broadcasters. Later, norms became international with the rise of the DVD and the proliferation of commercial TV in Europe. These days, the most influential force driving subtitling norms is arguably the global video on demand (VOD) providers. This paper investigates the subtitling guidelines of VOD giant Netflix, in search of the question: How local are interlingual subtitling norms for streamed television? The results show that there is little variation in the initial guidelines, but that they are continually becoming more varied, as they are localized using input from users.

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  • 40.
    Poignant, Elisabeth
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Institute for Interpreting and Translation Studies.
    Grasping and Reproducing Topical Episode Boundaries: Re-narration of Dialogue in Multi–turn Interpreting2018In: Translating Boundaries: Constraints, Limits, Opportunities / [ed] Stefanie Barschdorf, Dora Renna, Stuttgart, Germany: Ibidem-Verlag, 2018, p. 203-230Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In Sweden, numerous public conversations on literature featuring authors from abroad are held each year. Some of those are interpreted for the audience. Interpreting strategies evolve to cope with the formal constraints, as well as the amplification of a staged conversation, which is generated by the contextual setting and culture-interview communicative activity type that is characterised by narrative turns-in-talk. By combining the concepts of topical episode coherence and (re)production format, the analysis in the present paper demonstrates how alternating bilingual updating coincides with narrative development in an interpreter-mediated dialogue, as well as how the interpreter uses variously designed communicative resources to support the moderator and the writer in co-creating the speech event. 

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  • 41. Ruokonen, Minna
    et al.
    Salmi, LeenaSvahn, ElinStockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Institute for Interpreting and Translation Studies.
    HERMES - Journal of Language and Communication in Business: Thematic Section2018Collection (editor) (Refereed)
  • 42.
    Tiselius, Elisabet
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Institute for Interpreting and Translation Studies. Western Norway University of Applied Sciences, Norway.
    Interpreting in The Zone: Jack Hoza, Interpreting in the Zone: How the Conscious and Unconscious Function in Interpretation. Gallaudet University Press, 288 pp. ISBN 978-1-56368-666-52018In: International Journal of Interpreter Education, ISSN 2150-5772, E-ISSN 2150-5772, Vol. 10, no 1, p. 67-71Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 43.
    Lindqvist, Yvonne
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Institute for Interpreting and Translation Studies.
    Introduction to Part 42018In: World Literatures: Exploring the Cosmopolitan and Vernacular Exchange / [ed] Stefan Helgesson, Annika Mörte Alling, Yvonne Lindqvist, Helena Wulff, Stockholm: Stockholm University Press, 2018, p. 289-294Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 44.
    Wadensjö, Cecilia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Institute for Interpreting and Translation Studies.
    Involvement, trust and topic control in interpreter-mediated healthcare encounters2018In: Communication & Medicine: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Healthcare, Ethics and Society, ISSN 1612-1783, E-ISSN 1613-3625, Vol. 15, no 2, p. 165-176Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    By examining audio-recorded and transcribed, naturally occurring discourse data, this article shows how participants communicate involvement in two interpreter-mediated healthcare encounters. The article demonstrates how the relational exchange in these encounters, each involving a Swedish-speaking care provider, a young mother (one Spanish-speaking and one Russian-speaking) and a professionally trained interpreter, is affected by the way single participants orient to one another as conversational partners. The analysis also shows how primary participants’ orientation towards the interpreter as a conversational partner may have unexpected consequences for the interpreter’s degree of involvement and the participants’ control of conversational topics. Adding to previous studies of interpreter-mediated medical encounters explored as interaction (Wadensjö 1998), this article demonstrates the significance of shared and mutual focus between physicians and patients when it comes to building rapport and mutual trust across language barriers.

  • 45.
    Wadensjö, Cecilia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Institute for Interpreting and Translation Studies.
    Kontakt genom tolk2018 (ed. 2)Book (Other academic)
  • 46.
    Lindström, Jenny
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Institute for Interpreting and Translation Studies.
    Tesfazion, Malin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Institute for Interpreting and Translation Studies.
    Tiselius, Elisabet
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Institute for Interpreting and Translation Studies.
    Making theory work in practice: Theory and practice: intertwined and inseparable at TÖI, Stockholm University2018In: Proceedings: Nordic Seminar Umeå February 2018: Theory in practice – Practice in theory / [ed] Stefan Coster, Sveriges teckenspråkstolkars förening , 2018, p. 68-80Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The BA-programme in Swedish Sign Language and Interpreting, 180 ECTS. university level in Sweden. It is a three-year BA programme divided into six semesters of courses that are both practically and theoretically organized and it leads to a BA in Translation Studies with a focus on SSL interpreting. The first students enrolled in 2013 and graduated in 2016. There was a pause between the first and the second intake so, the second cohort will graduate in June 2018. Since 2015, intake has been regular every autumn, hence the third cohort are due to 2019 and the fourth one to 2020.

  • 47.
    Tiselius, Elisabet
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Institute for Interpreting and Translation Studies.
    Modeller för processer i tolkning2018In: Tolking: Språkarbeid og profesjonsutøvelse / [ed] Hilde Haualand, Anna-Lena Nilsson, Eli Raanes, Oslo: Gyldendal Akademisk, 2018, p. 38-60Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [sv]

    I detta kapitel beskrivs ett antal modeller för att analysera, illustrera och förklara tolkning. I det här kapitlet vill jag skapa förståelse för vad modeller i tolkning beskriver samt för hur deras teoretiska utgångspunkter kan påverka den beskrivningen. Modellerna är valda för att de fått stort genomslag både inom tolkforskning och tolkutbildning. Några är testade empiriskt, andra är utvecklade ur ett empiriskt datamaterial och ytterligare andra är utvecklade ur observationer och erfarenheter från lärare och forskare. Förhoppningen att läsaren får olika instrument att se på och analysera sin egen tolkning.

  • 48.
    Meister, Lova
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Institute for Interpreting and Translation Studies.
    On methodology: How mixed methods research can contribute to translation studies2018In: Translation Studies, ISSN 1478-1700, E-ISSN 1751-2921, Vol. 11, no 1, p. 66-83Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper explores mixed methods research as a methodological approach integrating 1) philosophical and conceptual stances, 2) inquiry logics and 3) research methods. It is found to be pluralistic in that researchers may approach all three domains in a variety of ways, and eclectic in that any combination of data, methods and theories may be justified provided the research design is internally coherent, integrative and offers the best possibility of answering the research question. A brief overview of methodological writings in translation studies and an investigation of 10 sample theses indicate that theories and methods are often combined and adapted in the discipline, though usually without drawing on mixed methods research. It is argued that mixed methods research offers a methodological framework that is well attuned to contemporary translation studies research, not least by promoting interactive research design and providing a way to bridge the gap between different research traditions.

  • 49.
    Sannholm, Raphael
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Institute for Interpreting and Translation Studies.
    Revisiting the Concept of Cooperation in Translation Work2018In: Työelämän viestintä, Arbetslivskommunikation, Workplace Communication, Kommunikation im Berufsleben: VAKKI-symposium XXXVIII 8.–9.2.2018, VAKKI Publications 9 / [ed] Liisa Kääntä, Mona Enell-Nilsson, Nicole Keng, Vaasa: University of Vaasa , 2018, Vol. 9, p. 35-47Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [sv]

    Syftet med den här artikeln är att problematisera begreppet samarbete i översättningssammanhang. Begreppet har lyfts fram i den översättningsvetenskapliga litteraturen som en central komponent i professionellt översättningsarbete, men definitionerna av begreppet skiljer sig åt. I artikeln redogör jag för olika perspektiv på begreppet samarbete, dels från en allmän tolkning av begreppet, dels från ett översättningsvetenskapligt perspektiv. Begreppet samarbete diskuteras också utifrån ett antal empiriska exempel från min pågående forskning, som syftar till att utforska professionellt översättningsarbete som social och kollektiv praktik. Sammanfattningsvis mynnar diskussionen ut i ett förslag till nyansering av begreppet samarbete, där typiska antaganden om t.ex. delade målsättningar som en komponent i interaktion mellan aktörer visar sig otillräckliga. Istället föreslås en initial uppdelning i samarbetsorienterade praktiker och proaktiva praktiker.

  • 50.
    Norberg, Ulf
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Institute for Interpreting and Translation Studies.
    Stachl-Peier, Ursula
    Skrivtolkning: muntlighet under skriftspråklig flagg2018In: Tolking: Språkarbeid og profesjonsutøvelse / [ed] Hilde Haualand, Anna-Lena Nilsson, Eli Raanes, Oslo: Gyldendal Norsk Forlag A/S, 2018, p. 159-179Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [sv]

    Skrivtolkning innebär tolkning från tal till skrift. I kapitlet ifrågasätts uppfattningen om skrivtolken som en snabbskrivande «maskin» som försöker skriva ned allt som sägs. Istället förfäktas tesen att skrivtolkning bör ses som en tolkningsform i sin egen rätt, och att tillämpande av rön från forskning kring andra former av tolkning kan fördjupa synen på skrivtolkning. Utifrån analyser av videoinspelad skrivtolkning i tre olika situationer (på en monologisk föreläsning, på ett seminarium med både monologiska och dialogiska passager och vid ett läkarbesök med snabb turtagning) diskuteras olika tolkningsstrategier och vilka roller skrivtolkar anammar. Det påvisas att varje situation kräver olika strategier och att ordagrant nedskrivande kan motverka klienternas deltagande istället för att främja det. Studien visar även att belysande av skrivtolkning ur ett tolkningsteoretiskt perspektiv kan bidra till att utforma mer tillförlitliga kvalitetskriterier. 

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