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Maxantalet träffar du kan exportera från sökgränssnittet är 250. Vid större uttag använd dig av utsökningar.
  • 1.
    Moilanen, Inka
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Historiska institutionen. Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Centrum för medeltidsstudier.
    Bishops and Pastoral Obligations2015Konferensbidrag (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
  • 2.
    Moilanen, Inka
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Historiska institutionen. Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Centrum för medeltidsstudier.
    Bishops and Pastoral Obligations: Ælfric’s Pastoral Letters and Preaching in the 11th and 12th Centuries2018Ingår i: Dominus Episcopus: Medieval Bishops between Diocese and Court / [ed] Anthony John Lappin, Elena Balzamo, Stockholm: Kungl. Vitterhets Historie och Antikvitets Akademien, 2018, s. 53-82Kapitel i bok, del av antologi (Refereegranskat)
  • 3.
    Moilanen, Inka
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Historiska institutionen. Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Centrum för medeltidsstudier.
    Correct Knowledge and the Aftermath of the Benedictine Reform in Anglo-Saxon and Anglo-Norman England2015Konferensbidrag (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
  • 4.
    Moilanen, Inka
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Historiska institutionen. Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Centrum för medeltidsstudier.
    Hagiography, Historiography and the Patterns of Sanctity: The Saga of Edward the Confessor and its European Contexts2015Ingår i: Medieval Nordic literature in its European context / [ed] Else Mundal, Oslo: Dreyer Forlag A/S, 2015, s. 126-151Kapitel i bok, del av antologi (Refereegranskat)
  • 5.
    Moilanen, Inka
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Historiska institutionen. Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Centrum för medeltidsstudier.
    Latin and Vernacular Homilies of Anglo-Saxon England: Preaching and Perceptions of Society2013Konferensbidrag (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
    Abstract [en]

    The advances in the study of homiletic writing of Anglo-Saxon England in the past few decades have made it possible to situate many seemingly formulaic and conventional texts in their specific historical contexts, and to perceive in them certain participation in and commentary on the contemporary social and political situation. This pertains especially to homilies written in Old English – the long-term primary interest of Anglo-Saxon scholarship – which may at times seem to overshadow the coexistent Latin culture. This paper pays attention to this division and explores both Latin and vernacular homiletic writing from the perspective of preaching and social perception. It examines the features of Latin and Old English as languages of teaching, and then discusses Archbishop Wulfstan’s (ca. 950-1023) Latin sermons as a case study, especially those in one of his own ‘Commonplace Books’, Copenhagen Kongelige Bibliotek, Gl. Kgs. Sam. 1595. From the outset, the linguistic division appears to have many fundamental implications for both composition and delivery: the Latin sermons and homilies were for the most part meant to be used in the monastic office, whereas the vernacular ones are thought to have served the needs of lay preaching or private devotion. In terms of social perception, therefore, preaching on social order, vices and virtues, or rules and responsibilities would have found its audiences in different social categories, at least in theory. In practice, the boundaries between these categories were much more fluid, and the language of a text in itself does not always denote a certain audience. The act of preaching as a potentially infuential type of medium in circulating ideas and conceptions on social order makes the two corpora essential sources for studying social ideas, their implementation and authorization. Consequently, the paper contributes to the discussion of both oral and literary as well as the Latin and vernacular communication in the Middle Ages.

  • 6.
    Moilanen, Inka
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Historiska institutionen. Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Centrum för medeltidsstudier.
    Law, Learning, and the Networks of Knowledge: Archbishop Wulfstan and the Worcester Manuscripts in Context2016Konferensbidrag (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
    Abstract [en]

    The fundamental interconnections between homiletics, religious instruction, legislation and political theory are apparent in the works of Wulfstan, Bishop of London and Worcester and Archbishop of York (d. 1023). When assessing the impact of Wulfstan’s own background on his religious-political discourse, however, we are forced to rely mainly on conjectures. His life before the appointment to the see of London in 996 remains unknown, and he rarely mentions his sources or quotes them verbatim. Wulfstan’s position in the politics of the day was nonetheless important, and it is clear that his monastic education played a crucial role in it. This paper explores this interconnectedness of learning, teaching and political engagement, focusing on manuscripts that can be connected to Wulfstan himself, as well as those connected to the cathedral monastery of Worcester. The purpose of the paper is, firstly, to shed light on Wulfstan’s own educational background and networks, and thus to elucidate his choices in transferring knowledge of the ’holy society’ into the political and legal discourse. Secondly, the paper also emphasizes the role of Worcester itself, as a node of learning through which these notions were further circulated by means of lay education, pastoral care, and secular legislation.

  • 7.
    Moilanen, Inka
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Historiska institutionen.
    Retoriikka ja historian tulkinta2016Ingår i: Historian teoria: Lingvistisestä käänteestä mahdolliseen historiaan / [ed] Kari Väyrynen, Jarmo Pulkkinen, Tampere: Vastapaino, 2016, s. 114-143Kapitel i bok, del av antologi (Refereegranskat)
  • 8.
    Moilanen, Inka
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Historiska institutionen. Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Centrum för medeltidsstudier.
    The Concept of the Three Orders of Society and Social Mobility in Eleventh-Century England2016Ingår i: English Historical Review, ISSN 0013-8266, E-ISSN 1477-4534, Vol. 131, nr 553, s. 1331-1352Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    This article examines the concept of the three orders of society (oratoresbellatoreslaboratores) in the works of Ælfric of Eynsham (d. c.1010) and Wulfstan of York (d. 1023). Paying attention to the immediate contexts in which Ælfric and Wulfstan formulated their views on social order, the article contrasts the varying uses of the metaphor with the discussion on social change and social mobility current around the turn of the first millennium. The reiteration of these categories seems to have surfaced in situations of particular political turbulence, as a means of convincing audiences that contemporary society was in a state of disorder which had to be remedied. The article incorporates analysis of a text previously excluded from discussions of the concept, Napier 50, and reviews some interpretations according to which the three orders functioned as part of criticism of extensive upward social mobility at the beginning of the eleventh century.

  • 9.
    Moilanen, Inka
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Historiska institutionen. Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Centrum för medeltidsstudier.
    Thom Mertens, Maria Sherwood-Smith,
 Michael Mecklenburg & Hans-Jochen Schiewer (red.), The Last Judgement in Medieval Preaching
. Sermo: Studies on Patristic, Medieval, and Reformation Sermons and Preaching 3. Turnhout: Brepols, 20132015Ingår i: Svenskt gudtjänstliv, ISSN 0280-9133, Vol. 90, s. 224-229Artikel, recension (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
  • 10.
    Moilanen, Inka
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Historiska institutionen. Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Centrum för medeltidsstudier.
    Virtues, Vices, and Vectors: Digital Tools and the Study of Medieval Sermons2019Övrigt (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
    Abstract [en]

    In May 2018, a workshop was held at Malmö University on the subject of Digital History, bringing together Scandinavian scholars from a number of history disciplines. The purpose of the workshop was to discuss ontologies of digital history from different perspectives and can be seen as a first step taken in order to engage critically with this growing field and to create an inter-Scandinavian network. These scholars are active within, for instance, digital pedagogy, public history, history, and literary history.

    In order to share the results of this workshop with a wider audience, a series of academic blog posts will be published every Friday for the next six weeks. These posts all engage with various aspects of the ontology of the digital and the “digital turn”: from a more general overview of the opportunities it provides, to its potential to bridge divides between disciplines and promote further understanding, and examples of practical applications in terms of new research methodologies. Questions are raised such as: how can digital media enable other forms of research communication than the book or article? How is the way scholars communicate their research shifting in response to new forms of digital media? Can digital methods promote cooperation between academic disciplines?

    This text focuses on the methodological, theoretical and critical aspects of using digital tools in the study of medieval source material. With the increase of digitized historical texts, databases with user-friendly search functions, and digital projects (or TRCs, Thematic Research Collections) with a mixture of research tools and a variety of archival material, the possibilities for historians have multiplied. That so many medieval texts have been transferred into digital formats in the past few years is an obvious advantage for medieval studies. Everyone is grateful that we can now find critical editions and high-resolution manuscript images straight from our own computer screens, and do the time-consuming research right at home, instead of travelling to different libraries and archives across the world. Not only can we now download a text and do the traditional close reading (often) for free, but we can now also manipulate the data that would have been near impossible with printed texts. This is what brings us to using digital databases as tools in the study of medieval sermons – not just as a deposit for texts in an electronic format.

    The digitized text itself allows for a re-evaluation of how we pose our research questions and calls for a critical discussion of the nature of our sources and the knowledge we gain from them. Although the process of making medieval texts available in a digital format is not complete (will it ever be?), [1] great accomplishments have been achieved in recent times that have made it possible to shift from the phase of reassembling and collation to one where scholars can use this new material in analyses that differ from ‘traditional’ methods of close-reading. In this respect, the methods that have been developed within Digital Humanities (reaching back to 1960s humanities computing, with its roots in the late 1940s) offer new and promising prospects for historians.

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