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  • 1.
    Bahar, Baser
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Asian, Middle Eastern and Turkish Studies, Stockholm University Institute for Turkish Studies (SUITS).
    Gezi Spirit in Diaspora2015In: Everywhere Taksim: sowing the Seeds for a New Turkey at Gezi / [ed] Isabel David, Kumru Toktamis, Amsterdam: Amsterdam University Press, 2015Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 2.
    Baser, Bahar
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Asian, Middle Eastern and Turkish Studies, Stockholm University Institute for Turkish Studies (SUITS). Coventry University, UK .
    Diasporas and Homeland Conflicts: A Comparative Perspective2015Book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    As violent conflicts become increasingly intra-state rather than inter-state, international migration has rendered them increasingly transnational, as protagonists from each side find themselves in new countries of residence. In spite of leaving their homeland, the grievances and grudges that existed between them are not forgotten and can be passed to the next generation.

    This book explores the extension of homeland conflicts into transnational space amongst diaspora groups, with particular attention to the interactions between second-generation migrants. Comparative in approach, Diasporas and Homeland Conflicts focuses on the tensions that exist between Kurdish and Turkish populations in Sweden and Germany, examining the effects of hostland policies and politics on the construction, shaping or elimination of homeland conflicts.

    Drawing on extensive interview material with members of diasporic communities, this book sheds fresh light on the influences exercised on conflict dynamics by state policies on migrant incorporation and multiculturalism, as well as structures of migrant organizations. As such, it will be of interest to scholars of sociology, political science and international studies with interests in migration and diaspora, integration and transnational conflict.

  • 3.
    Baser, Bahar
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Asian, Middle Eastern and Turkish Studies, Stockholm University Institute for Turkish Studies (SUITS).
    Gezi Spirit in the Diaspora Diffusion of Turkish Politics to Europe2015In: Everywhere Taksim: Sowing the Seeds for a New Turkey at Gezi / [ed] Isabel David, Kumru Toktamis, Amsterdam University Press, 2015, p. 251-266Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 4.
    Bezci, Egemen
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Asian, Middle Eastern and Turkish Studies, Stockholm University Institute for Turkish Studies (SUITS).
    Interregnum in Turkey-EU Relations2017In: Turkeyscope, Vol. 1, no 7, p. 2-3Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 5.
    Bezci, Egemen
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Asian, Middle Eastern and Turkish Studies, Stockholm University Institute for Turkish Studies (SUITS).
    Trajectory for Kurds2018Collection (editor) (Refereed)
  • 6.
    Bezci, Egemen B.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Asian, Middle Eastern and Turkish Studies, Stockholm University Institute for Turkish Studies (SUITS).
    Biri Bizi Gözetlemiş: Ikinci Dünya Savaşı Türkiye´sinde İngiliz İstihbaratı2017In: Toplumsal Tarih, ISSN 1300-7025, p. 26-31Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 7.
    Bezci, Egemen
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Asian, Middle Eastern and Turkish Studies, Stockholm University Institute for Turkish Studies (SUITS).
    Borroz, Nicholas
    The CIA and a Turkish Coup2016Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 8.
    Blumi, Isa
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Asian, Middle Eastern and Turkish Studies, Stockholm University Institute for Turkish Studies (SUITS).
    Adam Moore, Peacebuilding in Practice: Local Experience in Two Bosnian Towns2016In: International Journal of Turkish Studies, ISSN 0272-7919, Vol. 22, no 1/2, p. 222-226Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 9.
    Blumi, Isa
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Asian, Middle Eastern and Turkish Studies, Stockholm University Institute for Turkish Studies (SUITS).
    Alan Mikhail, Under Osman’s Tree: The Ottoman Empire, Egypt, and Environmental History2017In: ChoiceReviews, ISSN 0009-4978, Vol. 54, no 12, p. 212-213Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 10.
    Blumi, Isa
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Asian, Middle Eastern and Turkish Studies, Stockholm University Institute for Turkish Studies (SUITS).
    Battles of Nostalgic Proportion: The Transformations of Islam-as-Historical-Force in the Ideological Matrix of a Self-Affirming ‘West’2016In: Althusser and Theology: Religion, Politics, and Philosophy / [ed] Agon Hamza, Leiden: Brill Academic Publishers, 2016, p. 182-197Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 11.
    Blumi, Isa
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Asian, Middle Eastern and Turkish Studies, Stockholm University Institute for Turkish Studies (SUITS).
    Catapulted: Youth Migration and the Making of a Skilled Albanian Diaspora (by Burcu Akan Ellis)2016In: Balkanistica, ISSN 0360-2206, Vol. 29, no 2, p. 297-300Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 12.
    Blumi, Isa
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Asian, Middle Eastern and Turkish Studies, Stockholm University Institute for Turkish Studies (SUITS).
    Destroying Yemen: What Chaos in Arabia Tells Us About the World2018Book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Since March 2015, a Saudi-led international coalition of forces—supported by Britain and the United States—has waged devastating war in Yemen. Largely ignored by the world’s media, the resulting humanitarian disaster and full-scale famine threatens millions. Destroying Yemen offers the first in-depth historical account of the transnational origins of this war, placing it in the illuminating context of Yemen’s relationship with major powers since the Cold War. Bringing new sources and a deep understanding to bear on Yemen’s profound, unwitting implication in international affairs, this explosive book ultimately tells an even larger story of today’s political economy of global capitalism, development, and the war on terror as disparate actors intersect in Arabia.

  • 13.
    Blumi, Isa
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Asian, Middle Eastern and Turkish Studies, Stockholm University Institute for Turkish Studies (SUITS).
    Edin Hajdrapašić, Whose Bosnia?: Nationalism and Political Imagination in the Balkans, 1840-19142016In: International Journal of Turkish Studies, ISSN 0272-7919, Vol. 22, no 1/2, p. 213-217Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 14.
    Blumi, Isa
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Asian, Middle Eastern and Turkish Studies, Stockholm University Institute for Turkish Studies (SUITS).
    Europe’s Balkan Muslims: A New History By Nathalie Clayer and Xavier Bougarel, translated by Andrew Kirby2018In: Journal of Islamic Studies, ISSN 0955-2340, E-ISSN 1471-6917, Vol. 29, no 2, p. 289-291Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 15.
    Blumi, Isa
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Asian, Middle Eastern and Turkish Studies, Stockholm University Institute for Turkish Studies (SUITS).
    Gewalt und Koexistenz: Muslime und Christen im spätosmanischen Kosovo (1870–1913). By Eva Anne Frantz2017In: Hungarian Historical Review, ISSN 2063-8647, Vol. 6, no 1, p. 240-242Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 16.
    Blumi, Isa
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Asian, Middle Eastern and Turkish Studies, Stockholm University Institute for Turkish Studies (SUITS).
    Gingeras, Ryan. Fall of the Sultanate: the Great War and the End of the Ottoman Empire, 1908-1922. Oxford 20162017In: ChoiceReviews, ISSN 0009-4978, Vol. 54, no 5, p. 765-765Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 17.
    Blumi, Isa
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Asian, Middle Eastern and Turkish Studies, Stockholm University Institute for Turkish Studies (SUITS).
    Heather J. Sharkey, A History of Muslims, Christians, and Jews in the Middle East2017In: ChoiceReviews, ISSN 0009-4978, Vol. 55, no 2, p. 145-146Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 18.
    Blumi, Isa
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Asian, Middle Eastern and Turkish Studies, Stockholm University Institute for Turkish Studies (SUITS).
    Max Bergholz, Violence as a Generative Force: Identity, Nationalism, and Memory in a Balkan Community2017In: ChoiceReviews, ISSN 0009-4978, Vol. 54, no 10, p. 234-235Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 19.
    Blumi, Isa
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Asian, Middle Eastern and Turkish Studies, Stockholm University Institute for Turkish Studies (SUITS).
    Michael Provence, The Last Generation of the Making of the Modern Middle East, Cambridge University Press, 20172017In: ChoiceReviews, ISSN 0009-4978, Vol. 55, no 7Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 20.
    Blumi, Isa
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Asian, Middle Eastern and Turkish Studies, Stockholm University Institute for Turkish Studies (SUITS).
    Mohammad Hashim Kamali, The Middle Path of Moderation in Isalm: The Qur’anic Principle of Wasatiyyah2015In: ChoiceReviews, ISSN 0009-4978, Vol. 53, no 3, p. 210-210Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 21.
    Blumi, Isa
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Asian, Middle Eastern and Turkish Studies, Stockholm University Institute for Turkish Studies (SUITS).
    Peter Adamson, Philosophy in the Islamic World: A Very Short Introduction2016In: ChoiceReviews, ISSN 0009-4978, Vol. 53, no 8, p. 1232-1232Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 22.
    Blumi, Isa
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Asian, Middle Eastern and Turkish Studies, Stockholm University Institute for Turkish Studies (SUITS).
    Reorientating European Imperialism: How Ottomanism Went Global2016In: Die Welt des Islams, ISSN 0043-2539, E-ISSN 1570-0607, Vol. 56, no 3-4, p. 290-316Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Scholars have long studied Western imperialism through the prism of pre-World War I literature and journalism. Characterizing this literature as Orientalist has become programmatic and predictable. The sometimes rigid analysis of this literature often misses, however, the contested dynamics within. This is especially the case with analyses of Ottoman contributions to the rise of a Western colonialist ethos – orientalism, imperialism, and racism – reflecting the political, structural, and economic changes that directly impacted the world. Essentially, colonial pretensions – servicing the ambitions of European imperialism at the expense of peoples in the ‘Orient’ – were articulated at a time when patriotic Ottomans, among others, were pushing back against colonialism. This article explores the possibility that such a response, usefully framed as Ottomanism, contributed regularly to the way peoples interacted in the larger context of a contentious exchange between rival imperialist projects. What is different here is that some articulations of Ottomanism were proactive rather than reactive. In turn, some of the Orientalism that has become synonymous with studies about the relationship between Europe, the Americas, and the peoples “East of the Urals” may have been a response to these Ottomanist gestures.

  • 23.
    Blumi, Isa
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Asian, Middle Eastern and Turkish Studies, Stockholm University Institute for Turkish Studies (SUITS).
    Roger Hardy, The Poisoned Well: Empire and its Legacy in the Middle East2017In: ChoiceReviews, ISSN 0009-4978, Vol. 54, no 9, p. 132-133Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 24.
    Blumi, Isa
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Asian, Middle Eastern and Turkish Studies, Stockholm University Institute for Turkish Studies (SUITS).
    Stephan Conermann (Hrsg.): Everything is on the Move. The Mamluk Empire as a Node in (Trans-) Regional Networks (= Mamluk Studies, vol. 7), Bonn 20142016In: Comparativ. Zeitschrift für Globalgeschichte und vergleichende Gesellschaftsforschung, ISSN 0940-3566, no 2, p. 103-105Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 25.
    Blumi, Isa
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Asian, Middle Eastern and Turkish Studies, Stockholm University Institute for Turkish Studies (SUITS).
    Thanos Veremis, A Modern History of the Balkans: Nationalism and Identity in Southeast Europe2018In: ChoiceReviews, ISSN 0009-4978, Vol. 55, no 10, p. 201-202Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 26.
    Blumi, Isa
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Asian, Middle Eastern and Turkish Studies, Stockholm University Institute for Turkish Studies (SUITS).
    The Transformation of Islam in Kosovo and its Impact on Albanian Politics2015In: Religion in the Post-Yugoslav Context / [ed] Branislav Radeljić, Martina Topić, Rowman & Littlefield Publishers, 2015, p. 173-196Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 27.
    Blumi, Isa
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Asian, Middle Eastern and Turkish Studies, Stockholm University Institute for Turkish Studies (SUITS).
    [What You Should Read] What is Happening in Yemen2017In: Maydan, no 15 novemberArticle in journal (Other academic)
  • 28. Ciddi, Sinan
    et al.
    Levin, Paul T.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Asian, Middle Eastern and Turkish Studies, Stockholm University Institute for Turkish Studies (SUITS).
    Interdisciplinarity and Comparison in Turkish Studies2014In: Turkish Studies, ISSN 1468-3849, E-ISSN 1743-9663, Vol. 15, no 4, p. 557-570Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 29.
    D'Orsi, Lorenzo
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Asian, Middle Eastern and Turkish Studies, Stockholm University Institute for Turkish Studies (SUITS).
    Conspiracy narratives and memory of political violence within Turkish leftist families2018Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper analyzes conspiracy narratives within Turkish families of leftists revolutionaries affectedby State violence. It shows how such narratives are cultural frameworks through which a practicalknowledge of the State and experiences of political subjugation are conveyed through generations.

  • 30.
    D'Orsi, Lorenzo
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Asian, Middle Eastern and Turkish Studies, Stockholm University Institute for Turkish Studies (SUITS).
    Moral Thresholds of Outrage: The March for Hrant Dink and New Ways of Mobilization in Turkey2018In: Conflict and society: Advances in research, ISSN 2164-4543, E-ISSN 2164-4551, Vol. 4, no 1, p. 40-57Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article analyses the social construction of moral outrage, interpreting it as both an extemporaneous feeling and an enduring process, objectified in narratives and rituals and permeating public spaces as well as the intimate sphere of social actors’ lives. Based on ethnography carried out in Istanbul, this contribution focuses on the assassination of the Turkish Armenian journalist Hrant Dink in 2007. This provoked a moral shock and led to an annual commemoration in which thousands of people—distant in political, religious, ethnic positions—gather around a shared feeling of outrage. The article retraces the narratives of innocence and the moral frames that make Dink’s public figure different from other victims of state violence, thus enabling a moral and emotional identification of a large audience. Outrage over Dink’s murder has become a creative, mobilizing force that fosters new relationships between national history and subjectivity, and de-reifies essentialized social boundaries and identity claims.

  • 31.
    D'Orsi, Lorenzo
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Asian, Middle Eastern and Turkish Studies, Stockholm University Institute for Turkish Studies (SUITS).
    Remembering the 1980 Military Coup: An Anthropological Perspective on the Uses of Oral History in Turkey2018Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper draws on ethnographic investigation carried out in Istanbul on the painful memories of leftist organizations and families affected by the violence of the Turkish military coup of 1980-1983. It aims at critically addressing dichotomist interpretations of the recent proliferation of memory studies in Turkey, such as those relying on the antinomy between official state history and memories from below, or remembering as practice of resistance and state imposed amnesia. There are inherent risks in these approaches, for example an overshadowing of the plurality of uses of oral history in Turkey and of the actors involved in its production.

    The analysis of the uses of the past by former leftist revolutionaries, second generations (i.e. children of revolutionary fighters), as well as those NGOs engaged in bringing out repressed memories, reveals a plurality of logics and targets. Such plurality suggests divergent moral and political frameworks, such as the moral economy of the martyr fighter, in the case of former leftist militants, or the globalized model of Transitional Justice adopted by many NGOs. Through such frameworks, not only silenced memories are brought to light, but individual experiences and collective representations are shaped as well. They should not be analysed independently, because their targets make sense in relational terms within a conflictual, polarized and highly politicized memory field. In the analysis of the uses of oral history, my paper also includes interlocutors from the Turkish intelligentsia (academics, social scientists, artists, journalists). These are public figures endowed with a certain degree of social authority that allows them to address debates on memory. Although based on scientific approaches, their understanding of history and past are based on cultural frames that should be part of the analysis of the memory field.

     

  • 32.
    D'Orsi, Lorenzo
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Asian, Middle Eastern and Turkish Studies, Stockholm University Institute for Turkish Studies (SUITS).
    Temporary street shrine for imagining a different world: the march forHrant Dink2018Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Based on an ethnographic investigation carried out in Istanbul, this contribution analyses the annual commemoration for the Turkish-Armenian journalist Hrant Dink, who was killed in 2007. It sheds light on the role of a temporary street shrine in creating a moral community that crosses previous political, ethnic and religious belongings, and shows the sacred and the ritual as central categories for understanding the formation process of political participation in Turkey. According to many, state apparatus was behind the murder of a journalist who challenged the Turkish state official history. His death provoked an unexpected  “moral shock”, whereby thousands of people - antithetic for political, religious, ethnic positions - coagulate around a shared feeling of outrage and give life to an annual march that stops in the place where Dink was assassinated. Turkish memory field is highly politicized: despite the changes from a secularized to a pro-Islamic state narrative, official state history continues to be a repressive tool against minorities; the latter give life to counter-memories that ask for themselves the monopoly of suffering. Unlike other Turkish counter-hegemonic memories, Dink commemoration stands as mobilizing force able to re-write the relationship between public emotions and political protests, allowing to differently encapsulate a memory at margin.

    This paper retraces the narratives of vulnerability and innocence that have made appear Dink figure different from other victims of state violence, and enabled the identification of a large audience. Though may appear spontaneous, street sanctuary of Dink reveals a rich symbolic grammar, through which protesters break their identity boundaries and search for alternative connections with the “others”. Sounds, colours, memorabilia, ritualized actions, all concur to a mise-en-scène of mourning that (re)produce feeling of sorrow and moral indignation. My contribution shows how the sacred and the rite, here-in understood in Durkheimian terms of extra-ordinary spaces/times, do not merely “express” nor simply “reflect” collective values and social ties, but generate them. The sacred in Dink march creates an alternative moral order, draws a line between justice and injustice and transforms a street corner into a space of contestation, where participants express criticism of the state and society, bring forth a community of memory and remind themselves that ‘a different world’ is possible.

  • 33.
    D'Orsi, Lorenzo
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Asian, Middle Eastern and Turkish Studies, Stockholm University Institute for Turkish Studies (SUITS).
    When silence talks: The moral landscape of leftist painful memories in Turkey2018In: , 2018Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Drawing on an ethnography carried out in Istanbul, this talk examines the experience of silence in Turkish former revolutionaries’ families, the main victims of the 1980-1983 military coup, and challenges the universal model of traumatic silence, which overshadows local conceptualizations of the self. In Turkey, the 1980 coup was a political, cultural and generational watershed that dismantled leftist organizations through incarcerations and tortures. For leftist movements and families, the 1980 coup is the biographical and political tragedy upon which a mnemonic community is built. They are still in a counter-hegemonic position compared to official historiography, but have built a “strong memory” codified through the figure of revolutionary martyrdom.

    Within leftist families, silence and secrecy are common, even when past is told. On the one hand, silence is the consequence of the painful experiences lived by former militants; on the other hand, it cannot be reduced to the pre-cultural mechanism of unspeakable trauma. Domestic silence and secrecy should be understood in relation to the present and not to the past: they do not prevent emotional interactions but are a practical knowledge through which parents teach to second generations to perform a specific self in a still repressive public space. Moreover, silence over personal issues stands also in relation to a morality of “not saying”: it is part of a poetics of the self that is bound to the ethos of revolutionary fighter, whereby “telling is almost like crying”.

    This talk also focuses on generational gap, and shows how second generations often re-read their parents’ silence according to global memory frames, interpreting it as a “traumatic” element. For new generations, the language of trauma is a familiar cultural idiom which also allows them to extend social solidarity and partly break their marginality in an over-politicized memory field.

  • 34.
    D'Orsi, Lorenzo
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Asian, Middle Eastern and Turkish Studies, Stockholm University Institute for Turkish Studies (SUITS).
    Dei, Fabio
    What is a rite? Émile Durkheim, a hundred years later2018In: Open Information Science, E-ISSN 2451-1781, Vol. 2, no 1, p. 115-126Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper is focused on the anthropological concept of ritual, starting from Emile Durkheim's approach in Les formes élémentaires de la vie religieuse (1912). We discuss three different aspects of the Durkheimian perspective on religion and rituals: a) the sacred/profane dichotomy; b) the concept of collective representations - which establishes a substantial continuity between religious and scientific thought; c) a ‟practical” and performative interpretation of rites as the basis of social bond. During the twentieth century, these aspects have influenced different and sometimes opposing theoretical approaches (including ‟symbolist” and ‟neo-intellectualist” theories and Victor Turner's ‟anthropology of experience”). We briefly review each of them, arguing for the importance of reconsidering them into a unitary perspective, centred on religious phenomena as basically moral experiences and as the language of social relations. In the conclusions, we will show how such unitary approach helps us understand the transformations as well as the continuities of rituality in the individualized and secularized societies of what we call nowadays the Western world.

  • 35.
    Ekal, Berna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Asian, Middle Eastern and Turkish Studies, Stockholm University Institute for Turkish Studies (SUITS).
    Collaboration gone awry: The formation of women’s shelters as public institutions in Turkey2017In: Mediterranean Politics, ISSN 1362-9395, E-ISSN 1743-9418Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In terms of women’s shelters, Turkey sets a unique example due to the fact that the shelters are mainly established and run by public actors, whereas in other countries these institutions are mainly run by NGOs while funded by public authorities. By looking at the relation between the feminist movement and the public authorities from 1990s onwards, this paper argues that in the case of the public women’s shelters, the engagement of non-public actors in the policy making processes did not result in the retreat, but in the perpetuation of the state’s presence.

  • 36.
    Hadeel, Haider
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Asian, Middle Eastern and Turkish Studies, Stockholm University Institute for Turkish Studies (SUITS).
    Heder ur ett kvinnligt perspektiv: En kvalitativ studie med fokus på fem kvinnor med rötter från Mellanöstern i Sverige.2017Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [sv]

    Heder är viktig i många samhällen, men vad den har för betydelse och hur viktig den är skiljer sig mellan olika samhällen. Genom min studie belyser jag hur heder kan skilja sig mellan fem kvinnor med bakgrund från Mellanöstern, i förhållande till svenska samhället. Genom att lyfta fram kvinnornas berättelser och upplevelser i relation till könsroller och hedersdiskurser som råder både inom kvinnornas egna familjer samt i samhället. För att kunna presentera kvinnors upplevelser och uppfattningar använde jag mig av kvalitativa intervjuer där kvinnorna fick berätta om sina egna familjer och de olika sociala och kulturella normerna som familjen följer och som i sin tur påverkar deras uppfattningar om heder och kvinnans sociala position båda i familjen och i samhället i övrigt. Dessutom använde jag mig av tre teorier som är socialkonstruktivistiska perspektiv, intersektionella perspektiv och genussystem för att de ska hjälpa mig i analysen av kvinnornas uppfattningar och upplevelser. 

    Studiens resultat har visat att heder har en stor betydelse i kvinnornas liv, men de har olika syn på heder. Utifrån kvinnors position och könsroll i familjen har resultaten även visat skillnader mellan båda könen i familjen hos vissa informanter beroende på familjens påverkan av de olika kulturella och sociala normer som de har fått med sig från hemlandet och som i sin tur förstärker ojämlikheten mellan könen och mansdominansen i familjen. Dessutom att en misslyckad integration har lett till ökad svårighet att acceptera de nya normerna som finns i svenska samhället och ökat kontrollen över kvinnorna i familjen, vilket kan vara möjliga faktorer för hedersvåld och hedersproblematiken i Sverige.

  • 37.
    Levin, Paul T.
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Oriental Languages, Stockholm University Institute for Turkish Studies (SUITS).
    Ciddi, SinanGeorgetown University, Institute of Turkish Studies.
    Turkish Studies from an Interdisciplinary Perspective2014Collection (editor) (Refereed)
  • 38.
    Roth, Hans Ingvar
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Asian, Middle Eastern and Turkish Studies, Stockholm University Institute for Turkish Studies (SUITS).
    Auktoritär våg sätter demokratin ur spel2016In: Svenska Dagbladet, ISSN 1101-2412, no 4 aprilArticle in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 39.
    Roth, Hans Ingvar
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Asian, Middle Eastern and Turkish Studies, Stockholm University Institute for Turkish Studies (SUITS).
    Chile minns yrkeshjälten Edelstam2013In: Svenska dagbladet, ISSN 1101-2412, no 17 marsArticle in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 40.
    Roth, Hans Ingvar
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Asian, Middle Eastern and Turkish Studies, Stockholm University Institute for Turkish Studies (SUITS).
    Climate Fiction: Hot och gemenskap2016In: Dixikon, E-ISSN 2001-1768Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 41.
    Roth, Hans Ingvar
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Asian, Middle Eastern and Turkish Studies, Stockholm University Institute for Turkish Studies (SUITS).
    Det som kan köpas kan mista sitt värde2012In: Svenska dagbladet, ISSN 1101-2412, no 26 juniArticle, book review (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 42.
    Roth, Hans Ingvar
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Asian, Middle Eastern and Turkish Studies, Stockholm University Institute for Turkish Studies (SUITS).
    Diskriminering2008 (ed. 1)Book (Other academic)
  • 43.
    Roth, Hans Ingvar
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Asian, Middle Eastern and Turkish Studies, Stockholm University Institute for Turkish Studies (SUITS).
    Därför misslyckades militärkuppen2016In: Svenska Dagbladet, ISSN 1101-2412, no 20 juliArticle in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 44.
    Roth, Hans Ingvar
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Asian, Middle Eastern and Turkish Studies, Stockholm University Institute for Turkish Studies (SUITS). Lunds universitet, Lund, Swden.
    Educación en Derechos Humanos: Posibilidades y DesafiosHuman Rights Education: Possibilities and Challenges2013In: Paideia, ISSN 1904-9633, no 52, p. 31-54Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Human Rights as they are formulated in the UN Declaration of Human Rights from 1948 have become a moral lingua franca. We have also witnessed a so called Human Rights Revolution in the post war period with more declarations and conventions concerning vulnerable groups such as children, women, indigenous populations and disabled people. Stronger mechanisms for implementations such as Human Rights Courts (for example the European Court of Human Rights in Strasbourg) and the International Criminal Court in Hague have been introduced. In spite of this “Human Rights Revolution” the education –both at school and university level– concerning human rights have lagged behind. It is only in the later decade that serious attempts have been made to introduce hu-man rights in curriculums and in various subjects in the schools in several coun-tries around the world. The same phenomenon applies to many universities. This article tries to analyze this standing of human rights education from a global perspective and understand why the processes of formulating and implementing such an education have been so slow. A further question that will be raised is how a human rights education can be defined and practiced especially at various levels in school.

  • 45.
    Roth, Hans Ingvar
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Asian, Middle Eastern and Turkish Studies, Stockholm University Institute for Turkish Studies (SUITS).
    Freedom of Religion as a Distinct Human Right2016In: Religious Freedom and Religious Pluralism in Africa: Prospects and Limitations / [ed] Pieter Coertzen, M. Christian Green, Len Hansen, Cape Town: AFRICAN SUN MeDIA, 2016, p. 15-28Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 46.
    Roth, Hans Ingvar
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Asian, Middle Eastern and Turkish Studies, Stockholm University Institute for Turkish Studies (SUITS).
    Global etik - Peng Chun Chang och FN-förklaringen om de mänskliga rättigheterna2017In: Modern filosofi, ISSN 2002-0473, no 2, p. 60-63Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 47.
    Roth, Hans Ingvar
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Asian, Middle Eastern and Turkish Studies, Stockholm University Institute for Turkish Studies (SUITS).
    Helsingforsavtalet ännu inflytelserikt2015In: Svenska Dagbladet, ISSN 1101-2412, no 3 augustiArticle in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 48.
    Roth, Hans Ingvar
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Asian, Middle Eastern and Turkish Studies, Stockholm University Institute for Turkish Studies (SUITS).
    Hårdare klimat för en kompromiss2013In: Svenska dagbladet, ISSN 1101-2412, no 8 oktoberArticle, book review (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 49.
    Roth, Hans Ingvar
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Asian, Middle Eastern and Turkish Studies, Stockholm University Institute for Turkish Studies (SUITS).
    Ian McEwan - The Children Act2015In: Dixikon, E-ISSN 2001-1768Article, book review (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 50.
    Roth, Hans Ingvar
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Asian, Middle Eastern and Turkish Studies, Stockholm University Institute for Turkish Studies (SUITS).
    Individerna som format världen åt oss andra2017In: Svenska Dagbladet, ISSN 1101-2412, no 14 aprilArticle in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
12 1 - 50 of 91
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