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  • 1.
    Ahlgren, Hans
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    On the origin of the mountain hare on the island of Gotland: By means of ancient DNA analysis2011Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 30 credits / 45 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The island of Gotland houses a number of terrestrial mammalian species even though it was covered with ice during the last glacial period. The purpose of this study is to genetically analyse the mountain hare (Lepus timidus) to deduce its origin and genetic structure during different time periods, and also to discuss how it reached the island. A 130 base pair sequence of mitochondrial DNA from 38 prehistoric hares was analysed and compared to modern hares from different locations in Europe. The result shows a discrepancy among the samples creating two populations with different origin.

  • 2.
    Al Razzaz, Salim
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Soil Analysis for samples from the hill-fort of Hedeby2015Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [sv]

    Hedeby Hochburg, borgen i Hedeby, har fått förhållandevis lite uppmärksamhet, jämfört med själva samhället i Hedeby. Utgrävningen från 2012 har dock väckt ett intresse, med ett antal frågor som behöver besvaras. I denna uppsats analyseras jordprover som samlats under utgrävningen, för att se om de kan visa något om den kronologiska relationen mellan borgvallen och gravarna i borgen. Tre metoder användes, FTIR (Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy), röntgendiffraktion (XRD) och röntgenfluorescens (XRF). Resultaten från XRF och XRD visar på en rumslig relation mellan minst en av vallens konstruktionsfaser och nedsänkningen i ett lager innanför vallen. Relationen med gravarna är inte tydlig än, och analysen gav inga kronologiska ledtrådar. Resultatet kan användas som hypotes för vidare prövning i framti

  • 3.
    Alrawi, Loey
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    DNA Analysis on a Viking-age boat grave from Sala hytta Västmanland, grave A22017Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Viking-age boat grave burials are a less common but still repeatedly used way to bury the dead during the late Iron Age. Boat burials are exceptional in many aspects, not only due to placing the individual in a boat with numerous burial gifts including animals, but also by burying the individual without prior cremation, a common practice during the Iron Age. The aim of this thesis is to genetically analyse inhumation boat graves and compare the genetic composition of the ancient individuals with modern populations through population genetic analyses. This will highlight these particular human remains in a mobility context. A total of 11 individuals was analysed, but only one yielded enough DNA for further statistical analyses. This one individual proved genetically exceptionally well preserved. The results clearly show that the individual (a female) has a genetic affinity to populations in northern Europe. However, the results do not discriminate between modern Baltic/Scandinavian populations, depending on the statistical test.

  • 4.
    Alrawi, Loey
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Förekomsten av den genetiska varianten laktapersistens hos neolitiska grupper från Öland: The contribution of the genetic variant Lactase persistence among Neolithic people from the Baltic island Öland in Sweden2014Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This study deals with the contribution of the genetic variant lactase persistence among Neolithic people from the Baltic Island Öland. Skeletal remains from twelve individuals went through DNA sequencing in order to find the mutation that allows adult individuals to digest milk sugar. The twelve individuals were chosen from two different Neolithic sites, where the archaeological and isotopic data suggest that the individuals from Köpingsvik were hunters and gatherers and the individuals from Resmo were early farmers. The individuals with the genetic variant lactase persistence can be described with selection and genetic flow.  Only five individuals produced results and the mutation was found in two of the subjects. All the individuals who were successfully sequenced came from Resmo, whereasno individuals from Köpingsvik yielded any results.  

  • 5.
    Andersson, Christoffer
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Runsa - A hilltop settlement during the Migration Period: Distinguishing spatiality and organization through analyzing chemical imprints of daily activities2012Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 30 credits / 45 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Archaeologists have long noted the striking monumentality and large-scale efforts behind the Iron Age hilltop settlements. Yet, because of limited excavations, they represent a controversial part of the Migration Period society and much of their function remains hidden. This paper deals with questions concerning the inner organization and activities that took place within the Iron Age hilltop settlement at Runsa. The study is linked to the ongoing project ”Runsa fornborg –En befast centralplats i ostra Malardalen under folkvandringstid” which aims to investigate the socio-political functions of Runsa. In an attempt to establish a nuanced picture and distinguish space use within the hilltop settlement, a multi-variable approach is used. Alongside more traditional methods, element analysis by atomic absorption spectrophotometer (AAS) and lipid analysis by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) is emphasized.

  • 6.
    Andrén, Anders
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    Viberg, Andreas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Lidén, Kerstin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Victor, Helena
    Kalmar Länsmuseum.
    Fischer, Svante
    Uppsala universitet.
    The ringfort by the sea: Archaeological geophysical prospection and excavations at Sandby borg (Öland)2014In: Archäologisches Korrespondenzblatt, ISSN 0342-734X, Vol. 44, no 3, p. 413-428Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Archaeological investigations and clear aerial photos have identified the presence of house foundations within several ringforts on the island of Öland, east of the Swedish mainland. One of them, Sandby borg, was selected for further investigations by means of a ground-penetrating radar (GRP) and magnetometry survey. A subsequent excavation was carried out to validate the geophysical results. The results of the geophysical survey clearly show the presence of 36 or 37 stone foundations for houses situated radially around the wall of the fort as well as of 16 or 17 similar house foundations in a central building group. The geophysical results also provided information on other buried features within the fort and also confirm the location of a third gate situated in the north-western part of the fort. The available evidence indicates that the ringfort was used for military purposes, or as a place of refuge in times of unrest, for a limited period of time during the late 5th century.

  • 7.
    Angerbjörn, Anders
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Zoology.
    Hersteinsson, P.
    Liden, Kerstin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for the Study of Cultural Evolution.
    Nelson, E.
    Dietary Variation in Arctic Foxes (Alopex-Lagopus) - an Analysis of Stable Carbon Isotopes1994In: Oecologia, Vol. 99, no 3-4, p. 226-232Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We used stable carbon isotopes to analyse individual variation in arctic fox diet. We extracted collagen from bones (the lower jaw), and measured stable carbon isotopes. The foxes came from three different localities: Iceland, where both microtines and reindeer are rare; west Greenland, where microtines are absent; and Sweden, where seat analyses showed the primary food to be microtine rodents and reindeer. The Icelandic samples included foxes from both coastal and inland habitats, the Swedish sample came from an inland area, and the Greenland sample from coastal sites. The spatial variation in the isotopic pattern followed a basic division between marine and terrestrial sources of protein. Arctic foxes from inland sites had delta(13)C values of -21.4 (Ice land) and -20.4 parts per thousand (Sweden), showing typical terrestrial values. Coastal foxes from Greenland had typical marine Values of -14.9 parts per thousand, whereas coastal foxes from Iceland had intermediate values of -17.7 parts per thousand. However, there was individual variation within each sample, probably caused by habitat heterogeneity and territoriality among foxes. The variation on a larger scale was related to the availability of different food items. These results were in accordance with other dietary analyses based on seat analyses. This is the first time that stable isotopes have been used to reveal individual dietary patterns. Our study also indicated that isotopic values can be used on a global scale.

  • 8.
    Arrhenius, Birgit
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Finds of treasure and their interpretation with special reference to some hoards found in Birka and on Björkö2013In: Early Medieval Art and Archaeology in the Northern World: Studies in Honour of James Graham-Campbell / [ed] Andrew Reynolds & Leslie Webster, Leiden: Brill Academic Publishers, 2013, p. 843-858Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 9.
    Arrhenius, Birgit
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Jansson, Ingmar
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    Small items and major conclusions: A discussion of the findings from Gullhögen, Old Uppsala2015In: Small Things Wide Horizons: Studies in Honour of Birgitta Hårdh / [ed] Lars Larsson, Fredrik Ekengren, Bertil Helgesson and Bengt Söderberg, Oxford: Archaeopress, 2015, p. 141-149Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 10.
    Arrhenius, Birgit
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    O'Meadhra, Uaninn
    Excavations at Helgö: 18, conclusions and new aspects2011Collection (editor) (Other academic)
  • 11.
    Arrhenius, Brigit
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Brisingamen and the Menet necklace2009In: Glaube, Kult und Herrschaft Phänomene des Religiösen im 1. Jahrtausend n. Chr.in Mittel- und NordeuropaAkten des 59. Internationalen Sachsensymposionsund derGrundprobleme der frühgeschichtlichen Entwicklung im Mitteldonauraum / [ed] Uta von Freeden, Herwig Friesinger & Egon Wamers, Berlin, 2009, p. 219-230Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This article discusses the jewellery worn by the goddess Freyja, the Brisingamen. The author has previously claimed that brising (“glowing”) is a heiti for “garnet”, in Latin called carbunculus and in Greek ἄνθραξ. The word men has been compared by other authors to the Old German word menni meaning a collar for a dog. However, its origin may have been the Menet (alternatively Menat or Menit) – originally the necklace of the cow god Hathor which in the Greco-Roman time was taken over by the fertility goddess Isis. The Menet necklace was mostly used in ceremonies together with the musical instrument sistrum, when the rattling of the Menet was an important element. The late Roma like bracteates or coin imitations and garnet jewellery were important elements, too. Owing to its many metal pendants the Brisingamen could have produced a sound, though in this case not rattling but rather a sound more like jingle bells. This paper presents several precious items of jewellery representing Freyja’s Brisingamen from the Viking period, the most exquisite examples being the necklaces from Hoen in Norway and Eketorp in Sweden

  • 12.
    Bergh, Stefan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Landscape of the monuments: a study of the passage tombs in the Cúil Irra region1995Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
  • 13.
    Bergström, Liselotte
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Hus och hantverk: Arkeologisk undersökning av de övre terrasserna i Birkas Garnison. RAÄ 173, Björkö, Adelsö sn, Uppland, 2001-20042013Report (Other academic)
  • 14.
    Biström Freij, Felicia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    De levandes gåvor och de dödas efterlämningar: -En kemisk analys på harts och ökendadel (Balanites aegyptiaca) från två egyptiska kärl2014Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This paper aims to investigate the embalming process and the Balanites aegyptiaca from two pottery originated in ancient Egypt. The two objects were from Medelhavsmuseet in Stockholm. Samples were collected and analyzed with Fourier transform infrared spectrometry (FTIR) and Gas chromatography/mass spectrometry to identify which components the samples contained. The results show complex mixtures mainly consisting of resin origin from Pinaceae and the vegetable oils from the Balanites aegyptiaca.

  • 15.
    Björklund Andersson, Simone
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Spår av textilproduktion: En analys av sländtrissor och vävtyngder från yngre järnålderslokaler i Birkas omland.2015Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This bachelor thesis is regarding spindle whorls and loom weights from late Iron Age-sites and Viking Age-sites in adjoining relation to the Viking Age town Birka. The basis of this thesis concerns in which amount spindle whorls and loom weights occur at Viking Age-sites in Birka's hinterland; it refers to geographical areas in Södermanland County and Uppland County. Spindle whorls influences the textile raw materials and the spun threads, furthermore loom weights influences the warp and the woven cloths. Which threads and which cloth that were produced at the Viking Age-sites in adjoining relation to Birka will be discussed by regarding the weight, form and size of the spindle whorls and loom weights (though fragmental artifacts occur). The thesis will concern trails of textile production from Birka's hinterland and furthermore an investigation about domestic imports of textiles from the mainland to Birka could have oocurred during the Viking Age. The Results indicates that farmbased textileproduction has occured in Birka's hinterland and furthermore numerous of the farms in the hinterland can be discussed as farms with the possibility to export textiles to Birka.

  • 16. Bläuer, Auli
    et al.
    Arppe, Laura
    Niemi, Marianna
    Oinonen, Markku
    Lidén, Kerstin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Taavitsainen, Jussi-Pekka
    Kantanen, Juha
    Inferring Prehistorical and Historical Feeding Practices from δ15N and δ13C Isotope Analysis on Finnish Archaeological Domesticated Ruminant Bones and Teeth2016In: Fennoscandia Archaeologica, ISSN 0781-7126, Vol. XXXIV, p. 38-55Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 17.
    Bornholm, Johanna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Egyptens balsameringsteknik: en kemisk analys av organiska lämningar2013Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This paper deals with the embalming process in ancient Egypt. Samples were collected from six objects from Medelhavsmuseet in Stockholm. The objects were one supposed ladle and five different contents from pottery. Fourier transform infrared spectrometry (FTIR) and gas- chromatography/mass spectrometry was used to characterize the components of the materials. The result was then correlated with previously made analysis of embalming materials to discover similarities. The results show complex mixtures mainly consisting of resin from Pinaceae origin, also beeswax, vegetable oil and Castor oil. Some samples show differences in the mixture, one dominated by cholesterylacetat. The results of the ladle samples is comparable to previous samples from other analysis and can therefore be confirmed as an embalming ladle.

  • 18.
    Brynja, Elisabeth
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Kammar från Mälardalen AD 350-600: kammar från gravfält i Uppland, Södermanland och Västmanland : utformning, kontext och kronologi1998Licentiate thesis, monograph (Other academic)
  • 19. Burks, Jarrod
    et al.
    Viberg, Andreas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Bevan, Bruce
    Lightning strikes in archaeological magnetometry data: A case study from the High Bank Works site, Ohio, USA2015In: Archaeologia Polona: Special theme: Archaeological Prospection / [ed] Aleksandra Rzeszotarska-Nowakiewicz, 2015, Vol. 53, p. 256-260Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Determining whether a magnetic anomaly detected at an archaeological site has a natural or a cultural source can be quite challenging in some regions of the world because of magnetic variability related to soil development and differing rock/parent material types. Though not consistently recognized, lightning is one major source of magnetic anomalies on archaeology sites that has been consistently overlooked and misinterpreted. A case study from the high Bank Works in south-central Ohio, uSA shows the range of strike anomaly sizes, shapes, and intensities.

  • 20. Bäckström, Ylva
    et al.
    Mispelaere, Jan
    Ingvarsson, Anne
    Fjellström, Markus
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Britton, Kate
    Integrating isotopes and documentary evidence: dieatary patterns in a late medieval and early modern mining community, Sweden2018In: Archaeological and Anthropological Sciences, ISSN 1866-9557, E-ISSN 1866-9565, Vol. 10, no 8, p. 2075-2094Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study explores the relationship between dietary patterns and social structure in a pre-industrial mining community in Salberget, Sweden c. 1470 to 1600 A.D. using a combination of different research approaches and tools, including archaeology, osteology, bone chemistry and history. The correlation between demographic criteria (sex and age) and archaeological variables (burial type and burial location) shows that Salberget was a highly stratified community. Group diets were investigated through analyses of stable isotopes (carbon, δ 13C, and nitrogen, δ 15N) of bone collagen from a sub-sample of individuals buried at the site (n = 67), interpreted alongside data from human dental lesions and deficiencies, animal bone waste and information on eating habits extracted from the extensive historical documents regarding mining activities at Salberget. These integrated analyses provide a clear association between social status and diet and confirm that social status, and to a lesser extent sex, gender and age, likely governed food choice and opportunity in this diverse community.

  • 21.
    Calleberg, Kerstin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Stora torget: En geofysisk undersökning med georadar (GPR) av Stora torget i Sigtuna2016Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This paper contains geophysical analysis of the largest town square in Sigtuna, Sweden. The studied area is approximately 736 m2. The purpose of the study was to search for early medieval house remnants and to possibly find structures matching those found during excavations in other parts of the town. The hypothesis is that the town of Sigtuna was planned and that the yards of the town were put out in a special pattern following the main street, which is the same as today. During the day of the geophysical prospection the weather conditions were not optimal. A lot of water at the surface disturbed the instrument and gave a blurred image. It turned out that a lot of contemporary pipes and a large traffic island from the 1930s covered the area. Archaeological structures could only be seen in smaller areas in between later structures. Vague oblong structures could be seen, as well as a distinct smaller square on the eastern part of the area. A large rectangle close to the main street was also observed. None of these structures could be seen in modern maps or photographs and are therefore marked as something that could be of archaeological interest. Some of the structures that were noted were probably part of the original medieval town plan, as judged by their size and location.

  • 22.
    Calmfors, Lars
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for International Economic Studies.
    Heldin, Carl-Henrik
    Kragic Jansfelt, Danica
    Larsson, Mats
    Lidén, Kerstin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Lidin, Sven
    Sjöberg, Britt-Marie
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Öquist, Gunnar
    Dåliga jobbvillkor gör att Sverige tappar elitforskare2014In: Dagens nyheter, ISSN 1101-2447Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 23.
    Colas Åberg, David
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Hierarchy through Diet: Stable isotope analysis of male graves of the estate church graveyard in Varnhem2013Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [sv]

    Den här uppsatsen behandlar ett antal individer begravda mellan 800 e.Kr. och 1150 e.Kr i ett tidigt kristet gravfält kring ruinen av Varnhems gårdskyrka. Av speciellt intresse är den placeringen som gravarna har i förhållande till kyrkomurarna och vad dessa placeringar innebär statusmässigt. Analys av stabila isotoper har därför utförts på de manliga individerna  så att deras diet kan faställas och agera som en markör för vad som känneteckas som hög och lågstatus bland de begravda männen i Varnhem.  

  • 24. Craig, O. E.
    et al.
    Saul, H.
    Lucquin, A.
    Nishida, Y.
    Tache, K.
    Clarke, L.
    Thompson, A.
    Altoft, D. T.
    Uchiyama, J.
    Ajimoto, M.
    Gibbs, K.
    Isaksson, Sven
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Cultural Evolution.
    Heron, C. P.
    Jordan, P.
    Earliest evidence for the use of pottery2013In: Nature, ISSN 0028-0836, E-ISSN 1476-4687, Vol. 496, p. 351-354Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Pottery was a hunter-gatherer innovation that first emerged in East Asia between 20,000 and 12,000 calibrated years before present(1,2) (cal BP), towards the end of the Late Pleistocene epoch, a period of time when humans were adjusting to changing climates and new environments. Ceramic container technologies were one of a range of late glacial adaptations that were pivotal to structuring subsequent cultural trajectories in different regions of the world, but the reasons for their emergence and widespread uptake are poorly understood. The first ceramic containers must have provided prehistoric hunter-gatherers with attractive new strategies for processing and consuming foodstuffs, but virtually nothing is known of how early pots were used. Here we report the chemical analysis of food residues associated with Late Pleistocene pottery, focusing on one of the best-studied prehistoric ceramic sequences in the world, the Japanese Jomon. We demonstrate that lipids can be recovered reliably from charred surface deposits adhering to pottery dating from about 15,000 to 11,800 cal BP (the Incipient Jomon period), the oldest pottery so far investigated, and that in most cases these organic compounds are unequivocally derived from processing freshwater and marine organisms. Stable isotope data support the lipid evidence and suggest that most of the 101 charred deposits analysed, from across the major islands of Japan, were derived from high-trophic-level aquatic food. Productive aquatic ecotones were heavily exploited by late glacial foragers(3), perhaps providing an initial impetus for investment in ceramic container technology, and paving the way for further intensification of pottery use by hunter-gatherers in the early Holocene epoch. Now that we have shown that it is possible to analyse organic residues from some of the world's earliest ceramic vessels, the subsequent development of this critical technology can be clarified through further widespread testing of hunter-gatherer pottery from later periods.

  • 25.
    Dalén, Love
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Zoology.
    Götherström, Anders
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Angerbjörn, Anders
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Zoology.
    Identifying species from pieces of faeces2004In: Conservation Genetics, ISSN 1566-0621, E-ISSN 1572-9737, Vol. 5, no 1, p. 109-111Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 26.
    Dalén, Love
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Zoology.
    Götherström, Anders
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Tannerfeldt, Magnus
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Zoology.
    Angerbjörn, Anders
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Zoology.
    Is the endangered Fennoscandian arctic fox (Alopex lagopus) population genetically isolated?2002In: Biological Conservation, Vol. 105, no 2, p. 171-178Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The arctic fox population in Fennoscandia is on the verge of going extinct after not being able to recover from a severe bottleneck at the end of the 19th century. The Siberian arctic fox population, on the other hand, is large and unthreatened. In order to resolve questions regarding gene flow between, and genetic variation within the populations, a 294 bp long part of the mitochondrial hypervariable region 1 was sequenced. This was done for 17 Swedish, 15 Siberian and two farmed foxes. Twelve variable nucleotide sites were observed, which resulted in 10 different haplotypes. Three haplotypes were found in Sweden and seven haplotypes were found in Siberia. An analysis of molecular variance showed a weak, but significant, differentiation between the populations. No difference in haplotype diversity was found between the populations. A phylogenetic analysis revealed that the three Swedish haplotypes were not monophyletic compared to the Siberian haplotypes. These results indicate a certain amount of gene flow between the two populations. both before and after the bottleneck. Restocking the Fennoscandian population with arctic foxes from Siberia might therefore be a viable option.

  • 27.
    Dimc, Nathalie
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Pits, Pots and Prehistoric Fats: A Lipid Food Residue Analysis of Pottery from the Funnel Beaker Culture at Stensborg, and the Pitted Ware Culture from Korsnäs2011Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 30 credits / 45 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Investigating Neolithic pottery and vessel use could elucidate the duality between the farming Funnel Beaker Culture and the hunter-gathering Pitted Ware Culture during the Neolithic. The two archaeological groups differ on several accounts that are of great importance when interpreting past societies. However, it is the suggested differential subsistence economies that are of specific interest for this particular investigation. A comparative study based on the absorbed fatty acids in the ceramic material from two different Neolithic sites addresses the food cultures of the farming subsistence and the contrasting, contemporary hunter-gatherer society and the differences in resource-use. The investigation argues that food acts as an active social binder, and stress the importance of incorporating this aspect when discussing past cultures. The results of the analyses display difference in vessel use between the two sites as well as an intra-site difference at Korsnäs. It is argued that these differences are indicative of deviating food-cultures and spatial organisation at Korsnäs respectively. These results are combined with the previously conducted osteological analyses and stable isotopic analyses an approach that contribute to a more dynamic understanding of the Neolithic food cultures than what has been available before. Investigating Neolithic pottery and vessel use could elucidate the duality between the farming Funnel Beaker Culture and the hunter-gathering Pitted Ware Culture during the Neolithic. The two archaeological groups differ on several accounts that are of great importance when interpreting past societies. However, it is the suggested differential subsistence economies that are of specific interest for this particular investigation. A comparative study based on the absorbed fatty acids in the ceramic material from two different Neolithic sites addresses the food cultures of the farming subsistence and the contrasting, contemporary hunter-gatherer society and the differences in resource-use. The investigation argues that food acts as an active social binder, and stress the importance of incorporating this aspect when discussing past cultures. The results of the analyses display difference in vessel use between the two sites as well as an intra-site difference at Korsnäs. It is argued that these differences are indicative of deviating food-cultures and spatial organisation at Korsnäs respectively. These results are combined with the previously conducted osteological analyses and stable isotopic analyses an approach that contribute to a more dynamic understanding of the Neolithic food cultures than what has been available before.

  • 28. Donoghue, Helen D
    et al.
    Marcsik, Antonia
    Matheson, Carney
    Vernon, Kim
    Nuorala, Emilia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Molto, Joseph E
    Greenblatt, Charles L
    Spigelman, Mark
    Co-infection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Mycobacterium leprae in human archaeological samples: a possible explanation for the historical decline of leprosy2005In: Proceedings of the Royal Society of London. Biological Sciences, ISSN 0962-8452, E-ISSN 1471-2954, Vol. 272, no 1561, p. 389-394Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Both leprosy and tuberculosis were prevalent in Europe during the first millennium but thereafter leprosy declined. It is not known why this occurred, but one suggestion is that cross-immunity protected tuberculosis patients from leprosy. To investigate any relationship between the two diseases, selected archaeological samples, dating from the Roman period to the thirteenth century, were examined for both Mycobacterium leprae and Mycobacterium tuberculosis DNA, using PCR. The work was carried out and verified in geographically separate and independent laboratories. Several specimens with palaeopathological signs of leprosy were found to contain DNA from both pathogens, indicating that these diseases coexisted in the past. We suggest that the immunological changes found in multi-bacillary leprosy, in association with the socio-economic impact on those suffering from the disease, led to increased mortality from tuberculosis and therefore to the historical decline in leprosy.

  • 29.
    Däcker, Bjarne
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Drömmar i kras: Analys av glasfragment från Birkas hamn2016Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This essay reports from a study using XRF of thirteen glass fragments found in the harbour of

    the Viking town of Birka some interesting observations were made. Two fragments are

    coloured using antimony and manganese. One fragment could have been made using wood

    ash glass. Two fragments contain chromium which might imply provenance from Lorraine-

    Alsace.

  • 30.
    Economou, Christos
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Kjellström, Anna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Osteoarchaeological Research Laboratory.
    Lidén, Kerstin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Panagopoulos, Ioannis
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Ancient-DNA reveals an Asian type of Mycobacterium leprae in medieval Scandinavia2013In: Journal of Archaeological Science, ISSN 0305-4403, E-ISSN 1095-9238, Vol. 40, no 1, p. 465-470Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Leprosy is a chronic infection of the skin and peripheral nerves caused by the pathogen Mycobacterium leprae. Its impact on human populations and societies of the past as well as its phylogeographic patterns around the world – at least in modern times – has been well documented. This slow growing bacterium has been shown to exist in distinct ‘SNP types’ that occur in relatively defined parts of the globe. The routes that the disease followed in the past are, however, still uncertain. This study of ancient-DNA typing of archaeological human remains from Sweden dated to early Medieval times provides genetic evidence that a transmission of M. leprae ‘SNP subtype’ 2G – found mainly in Asia – took or had already taken place at that time from the Middle East to Scandinavia. This finding is unique in the history of leprosy in Europe. All human specimens from this continent – both modern and ancient – that have been tested to date showed that the one responsible for the infection strains of M. leprae belong to ‘SNP type’ 3, whereas our results show that there were some European populations that were hosts to bacteria representing ‘SNP type’ 2 of the species as well.

  • 31.
    Eklund, Markus
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Mosslik och kärrskelett: Analys av torv från ett skelett utgrävt vid offersjön Bokaren2016Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This paper examines peat that was discovered next to a skeleton dug out in wetlands next to lake Bokaren in Uppland, Sweden, in 2015. The skeleton was that of a man from the Roman Iron Age. It was found in fen peat, where soft tissue decomposes but bones are often well preserved.

    The elemental composition of the peat was examined using X-ray fluorescence. It was found that the composition of heavy elements was likely a result from exchange between the body and the peat. There were also trace elements, some of which may originate from medicine or other use. There may also be traces of brass. X-ray diffraction however revealed no trace of mineral formation.

    The lipid content of the peat was examined using Gas Chromatography and Mass Spectrometry. Fatty acids, cholesterol and degradation products expected from a waterlogged, anaerobic environment where discovered. Dark-colored peat surrounding body was found to contain lipids from the body and lipids from the inside of the skull where particularly well preserved. Theoretically, both lipid analysis and XRF could be used to locate bodies in fen peat by sampling.

    From the lipid analysis, one may draw the conclusion that it was a primary burial and that the body was put in a wet context short time after death. Efforts may have been taken to prevent the body from floating to the surface. The head of the body probably came off during decomposition with soft tissue remaining.

  • 32.
    Engerdahl, Tomas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Tools of the Trade: An analysis using conservation and SEM of the context and iron material from the excavation of House X in the city block Humlegården 3 in Sigtuna2012Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 30 credits / 45 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Sigtuna’s trade and production has been the subject of an increasing amount of archaeological investigations during the last 30 years. However, most of the research has been conductedregarding the buildings, coin mints and precious metal objects. This thesis will instead research one of the basics of the production, namely the iron. By reviewing the iron objectsand currency bars from house X in the city block Humlegården 3. Through high precision studies with conservation and scanning electron microscope I will be able to come one step closer to identifying what sort of items were produced on the site and discerning what status and function the smithy had. I will also investigate the possibility to track the origin of the iron. 

  • 33.
    Eriksson, Caroline
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Jakten på den rituella måltiden: Lipidanalyser med GC-MS på cypriotisk järnålderskeramik från kultplatsen Ayia Irini2014Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this paper was to study fourteen pottery sherds found at the site of Ayia Irini in northern Cyprus using Gas chromatography- Mass spectrometry. Ayia Irini has by the archaeologists of the Swedish Cyprus Expedition been interpreted as a sanctuary, with activity spanning from the Late Bronze Age throughout the Cypriot Iron Age.

    The results showed traces of vegetable lipids in almost all samples, and traces of lipids from terrestrial animals in all but two. One sample showed traces of resin. Several samples were contaminated by different components found in plastics, such as plasticizers. No obvious common denominators were found for samples of similar pottery type or similar dating. The analysis yielded results of differing quality in all samples. However, usable data was collected from all except one sample, which was too heavily contaminated to glean any clear traces of organic residue from the time of deposit.

  • 34.
    Eriksson, Gunilla
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for the Study of Cultural Evolution.
    Immigrant, returnee or commuter?2007In: On the Road: Studies in honour of Lars Larsson / [ed] Hårdh, B, Jennbert, K. & Olausson, D., Almqvist & Wiksell International, Stockholm , 2007, p. 188-192Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 35.
    Eriksson, Gunilla
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Isotopanalys av ett humanben från Brunstad konferansesenter, Stokke, Vestfold, Norge2015Report (Other academic)
  • 36.
    Eriksson, Gunilla
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Isotopanalyser av humant och animalt skelettmaterial från Strandvägen, Motala, RAÄ 290, Östergötland2016Report (Other academic)
  • 37.
    Eriksson, Gunilla
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Isotopanalyser av humant skelettmaterial från Stora Uppåkra, Uppåkra sn, Skåne2011Report (Other academic)
  • 38.
    Eriksson, Gunilla
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Isotopanalyser av material från Jävre och Luleå i Norrbotten2015Report (Other academic)
  • 39.
    Eriksson, Gunilla
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Kol- och kväveisotopanalyser av humant material från Gnista, Danmark sn, Uppland2015Report (Other academic)
  • 40.
    Eriksson, Gunilla
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Norm and difference: Stone Age dietary practice in the Baltic region2003Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Stone Age research on Northern Europe frequently makes gross generalizations about the Mesolithic and Neolithic, although we still lack much basic knowledge on how the people lived. The transition from the Mesolithic to the Neolithic in Europe has been described as a radical shift from an economy dominated by marine resources to one solely dependent on farming. Both the occurrence and the geographical extent of such a drastic shift can be questioned, however. It is therefore important to start out at a more detailed level of evidence in order to present the overall picture, and to account for the variability even in such regional or chronological overviews. Fifteen Stone Age sites were included in this study, ranging chronologically from the Early Mesolithic to the Middle or Late Neolithic, c. 8300–2500 BC, and stretching geographically from the westernmost coast of Sweden to the easternmost part of Latvia within the confines of latitudes 55–59° N. The most prominent sites in terms of the number of human and faunal samples analysed are Zvejnieki, Västerbjers and Skateholm I–II. Human and faunal skeletal remains were subjected to stable carbon and nitrogen isotope analysis to study diet and ecology at the sites. Stable isotope analyses of human remains provide quantitative information on the relative importance of various food sources, an important addition to the qualitative data supplied by certain artefacts and structures or by faunal or botanical remains. A vast number of new radiocarbon dates were also obtained.

    In conclusion, a rich diversity in Stone Age dietary practice in the Baltic Region was demonstrated. Evidence ranging from the Early Mesolithic to the Late Neolithic show that neither chronology nor location alone can account for this variety, but that there are inevitably cultural factors as well. Food habits are culturally governed, and therefore we cannot automatically assume that people at similar sites will have the same diet.

    Stable isotope studies are very important here, since they tell us what people actually consumed, not only what was available, or what one single meal contained. We should not be deceived in inferring diet from ritually deposited remains, since things that were mentally important were not always important in daily life. Thus, although a ritual and symbolic norm may emphasize certain food categories, these may in fact contribute very little to the diet. By the progress of analysis of intra-individual variation, new data on life history changes have been produced, revealing mobility patterns, breastfeeding behaviour and certain dietary transitions. The inclusion of faunal data has proved invaluable for understanding the stable isotope ecology of a site, and thereby improve the precision of the interpretations of human stable isotope data. The special case of dogs, though, demonstrates that these animals are not useful for inferring human diet, since, due to the number of roles they possess in human society, dogs could deviate significantly from humans in their diet, and in several cases have been proved to do so.

    When evaluating radiocarbon data derived from human and animal remains from the Pitted-Ware site of Västerbjers on Gotland, the importance of establishing the stable isotope ecology of the site before making deductions on reservoir effects was further demonstrated.

    The main aim of this thesis has been to demonstrate the variation and diversity in human practices, challenging the view of a “monolithic” Stone Age. By looking at individuals and not only at populations, the whole range of human behaviour has been accounted for, also revealing discrepancies between norm and practice, which are frequently visible both in the archaeological record and in present-day human behaviour.

  • 41.
    Eriksson, Gunilla
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Part-time farmers or hard-core sealers?: Västerbjers studied by means of stable isotope analysis2004In: Journal of Anthropological Archaeology, ISSN 0278-4165, Vol. 23, no 2, p. 135-162Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 42.
    Eriksson, Gunilla
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for the Study of Cultural Evolution. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Stable isotope analysis of human and faunal remains from Zvejnieki2006In: Back to the origin: New research in the mesolithic-neolithic Zvejniek cemetery and environment, Northern Latvia / [ed] Larsson, Lars & Zagorska, Ilga, Almqvist & Wiksell , 2006, p. 183-215Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Stable carbon and nitrogen isotope nalysis of human faunal remains from Zvejnieki Stone Age complex revealed a considerable input of freswater fish in the diet of people buried at Zvejnieki. This emphasison freshwater fish diminished in the Late Neoltithic and Bronze Age periods.

  • 43.
    Eriksson, Gunilla
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Stable isotope analysis of humans2013In: The Oxford Handbook of the Archaeology of Death and Burial / [ed] Tarlow, Sarah & Nilsson Stutz, Liv, Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2013, p. 123-146Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Stable isotope analyses of skeletal remains have become increasingly important within the field of archaeology during the past few decades. Given that the analyses can (under certain circumstances) provide direct data at the individual level regarding, for example, subsistence, actual consumption of specific foodstuffs, the transition from foraging to farming, breastfeeding patterns, mobility, migration and contact with other groups, this is not surprising. This chapter provides an overview of the kind of archaeological issues that can be addressed with the use of stable isotope analyses, based on four of the most commonly used light elements (carbon, nitrogen, oxygen and sulphur), with an emphasis on carbon and nitrogen. The applications are illustrated with examples from various parts of the world, ranging from Pleistocene to Medieval date. It also deals with how and why the analyses work, and bring up some methodological limitations and potential pitfalls.

  • 44.
    Eriksson, Gunilla
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Frei, Karin Margarita
    Howcroft, Rachel
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Gummesson, Sara
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Osteoarchaeological Research Laboratory.
    Molin, Fredrik
    Lidén, Kerstin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Frei, Robert
    Hallgren, Fredrik
    Diet and mobility among Mesolithic hunter-gatherers in Motala (Sweden) - The isotope perspective2018In: Journal of Archaeological Science: Reports, ISSN 2352-409X, E-ISSN 2001-1199, Vol. 17, p. 904-918Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Recent excavations at the sites of Strandvägen and Kanaljorden in Motala, Eastern Central Sweden, have unearthed complex and varied funerary remains from the Mesolithic. The two sites are situated on opposite banks of the river Motala Ström. While geographically close and roughly covering the same time span (c. 8000–7000 cal. BP), the funerary remains reveal differences and similarities in the treatment of the dead between the two localities. While at Strandvägen human bones were mostly found either scattered along the river bed or in inhumation graves, Kanaljorden contains wetland depositions of disarticulated skulls. We have conducted multi-isotope analyses of δ13C, δ15N, δ34S and 87Sr/86Sr of human and animal remains with the aim of reconstructing the dietary patterns, geographic provenance and mobility of the interred. A series of faunal reference samples and, in the case of 87Sr/86Sr, soil samples have been analysed in order to establish relevant isotopic baselines. The results show a protein intake dominated by aquatic resources, probably consisting of both freshwater and marine fish in varied proportions. The strontium isotope data indicate an interesting distinction between the individuals buried on either side of the river Motala Ström. Five out of six sampled individuals from Strandvägen have isotope ratios consistent with a local provenance, whereas ratios from seven out of eight Kanaljorden individuals indicate a non-local origin. The δ34S analysis proved problematic as a majority of the samples appear to be affected by diagenesis. This is probably the result of contamination by exogenous sulphur from surrounding fluvial and lacustrine sediments, as has previously been reported from other waterlogged sites.

  • 45.
    Eriksson, Gunilla
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Lidén, K
    Skateholm revisited: New stable isotope evidence on humansManuscript (Other academic)
  • 46.
    Eriksson, Gunilla
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Lidén, Kerstin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Dietary life histories in Stone Age Northern Europe2013In: Journal of Anthropological Archaeology, ISSN 0278-4165, E-ISSN 1090-2686, Vol. 32, no 3, p. 288-302Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We present here a framework for using stable isotope analysis of bone and teeth to study individual life history. A sampling strategy and analytical approach for stable carbon and nitrogen analysis of bone and dentine collagen optimised for intra-individual purposes is put forward. The rationale behind this strategy, various requirements and constrains, and recommendations on how to modify it according to variations in material and analytical instrumentation, are discussed and explained in detail. Based on intra-individual data for 131 human individuals from Mesolithic and Neolithic sites in Northern Europe, we consider the sources and various kinds of variation one is likely to find, and how the data can be explained and transformed into an archaeologically meaningful interpretation. It is concluded that the use of stable isotope analysis to trace individual life history is not limited to carefully excavated, neatly preserved, single burials with articulate skeletal remains. Even collective burials, disturbed graves, disarticulated human remains in cultural layers, or other depositions that deviate from what is often considered as a proper burial, offer the possibility to look at individual life biographies.

  • 47.
    Eriksson, Gunilla
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Linderholm, Anna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Fornander, Elin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Kanstrup, Marie
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Schoultz, Pia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Olofsson, Hanna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Lidén, Kerstin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Same island, different diet: Cultural evolution of food practice on Öland, Sweden, from the Mesolithic to the Roman Period2008In: Journal of Anthropological Archaeology, ISSN 0278-4165, E-ISSN 1090-2686, Vol. 27, no 4, p. 520-543Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Mesolithic–Neolithic transition in north-west Europe has been described as rapid and uniform, entailing a swift shift from the use of marine and other wild resources to domesticated terrestrial resources. Here, we approach the when, what and how of this transition on a regional level, using empirical data from Öland, an island in the Baltic Sea off the Swedish east coast, and also monitor changes that occurred after the shift. Radiocarbon dating and stable carbon and nitrogen isotope analyses of bones and teeth from 123 human individuals, along with faunal isotope data from 27 species, applying to nine sites on Öland and covering a time span from the Mesolithic to the Roman Period, demonstrate a great diversity in food practices, mainly governed by culture and independent of climatic changes. There was a marked dietary shift during the second half of the third millennium from a mixed marine diet to the use of exclusively terrestrial resources, interpreted as marking the large-scale introduction of farming. Contrary to previous claims, this took place at the end of the Neolithic and not at the onset. Our data also show that culturally induced dietary transitions occurred continuously throughout prehistory. The availability of high-resolution data on various levels, from intra-individual to inter-population, makes stable isotope analysis a powerful tool for studying the evolution of food practices.

  • 48.
    Eriksson, Gunilla
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Lõugas, L
    Zagorska, I
    Stone Age hunter–fisher–gatherers at Zvejnieki, northern Latvia: Radiocarbon, stable isotope and archaeozoology data2003In: Before farming, ISSN 1476-4261, no 1Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 49.
    Eriksson, Gunilla
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Papmehl-Dufay, Ludvig
    Lidén, Kerstin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Cultural interaction and change: a multi-isotopic approach to the Neolithization in coastal areas2013In: World archaeology, ISSN 0043-8243, E-ISSN 1470-1375, Vol. 45, no 3, p. 430-446Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Drawing on data from the megalithic tomb in Resmo on oland in the Baltic Sea, we use a multi-isotopic approach, involving the systematic treatment and modelling of extensive human and faunal isotopic data (C-14, C-13, N-15, S-34 and Sr-87/Sr-86), along with archaeological contextual evidence, to study change and interaction. The fact that people utilize aquatic resources necessitates modelling of the sulphur and strontium isotope data, to prevent the aquatic contribution from obscuring the local terrestrial signal. It was possible to demonstrate how the people buried in Resmo went through dynamic changes in diet, mobility patterns and cultural identity during more than two millennia of burial practice: from the incipient farmers of the Funnel Beaker Culture, through the cultural encounters and transitions during the Middle Neolithic, to the newcomers furthering intensified agriculture, trade and metal craftsmanship during the Bronze Age.

  • 50.
    Eriksson, Gunilla
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Zagorska, I
    Do dogs eat like humans?: Marine stable isotope signals in dog teeth from inland Zvejnieki2002In: Mesolithic on the Move: Papers presented at the Sixth International Conference on The Mesolithic in Europe, Stockholm 2000, Stockholm: International Conference on the Mesolithic in Europe , 2002, p. 160-168Chapter in book (Other academic)
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