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  • 1.
    Ahlin Sundman, Elin
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Osteoarchaeological Research Laboratory.
    Kjellström, Anna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Osteoarchaeological Research Laboratory.
    Signs of sinusitis in times of urbanization in Viking Age-early Medieval Sweden2013In: Journal of Archaeological Science, ISSN 0305-4403, E-ISSN 1095-9238, Vol. 40, no 12, p. 4457-4465Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The influence and possible negative impact on sinus health of living conditions in rural and urban environments in Viking Age (AD 800–1050) and Early Medieval Sweden (AD 1050–1200) is investigated. Skeletal samples from 32 rural settlements in the Mälaren Valley (AD 750–1200) and burials in the nearby proto-urban port of trade Birka (AD 750–960) are examined. Based on the diagnostic criteria for maxillary sinusitis used in earlier studies, the results show that there is no significant difference in the prevalence of signs of sinusitis between the two materials (i.e. the Mälaren Valley versus Birka). Consequently, this provides no evidence that living in a proto-urban environment had a negative impact on sinus health. However, when compared with previously studied samples from the early medieval town Sigtuna, dated to AD 970–1100, the populations of the Mälaren Valley and Birka show significantly lower frequencies of bone changes interpreted as chronic maxillary sinusitis (95%, 70% and 82% respectively). This implies that the urban environment of Sigtuna could have led to impaired sinus health. There is also a significant difference between males and females in the Birka material, in which more females (100%) than males (68%) were affected. A gender based differentiation in work tasks is suggested by this, or exposure to environmental risk factors that affect sinus health. No difference between males and females could be detected in the samples from the Mälaren Valley and Sigtuna.

  • 2.
    Andersson, Ida
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Osteoarchaeological Research Laboratory.
    Gravar i Gränslandet: En osteoarkeologisk jämförelse mellan gravfält från yngre järnåldern i Västmanland2014Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Köping is a small town in Västmanland, which is situated in the westernmost part of Lake Mälaren and in the southeast of Bergslagen. Köping was established and received its rights as a town in 1474. However, archaeological findings showthat Köping was a settlement in late prehistoric and early historic periods and continued to be an important place up until recent times. Due to the location Köping was a marketplace with connections and good fairways from all directions and most of all by LakeMälaren. Ancient monuments and remains indicate thatKöping were well established in the early Iron Age and mainly in the Vendel era in 550-800 A.D, which is the era in focus here. Even though there are many archaeological remains in and around Köping very little research has been done. There have been several excavations but there have been few further studies and close to no osteological analyzes. This paper will deal with four burial grounds which all were mostly excavated in the first half of the 20thcentury, and are briefly reported. The burial sites are all located in Köping with at the most 5 km from each other, and were all used during the Vendel era. Two of the sites, Jämmertuna and Kramsta, mainly have stone-settings with cremated bones. One of the sites is located next to a great tumulus called Ströbohög, and consists of smaller mounds and stone-settings. All with cremated bones. The last one is a burial site that is called Norsa which consists of both stone-settings with cremated bones and also burials containing boatgraves and chamber tombs. All of these burial customs are common in Mälardalen during this time. What is interesting is the location, inhumation of the cemeteriesand also that they have not beenused for a long period of time. A comparative study is presented of a similar butlarger site in Tuna in Badelunda, Västerås, which is located about 40 km from Köping. This will be an osteoarchaeological study with the purpose to understand this characterof the areaduring this time as the westernmost part of Lake Mälaren and as a part of Bergslagen. There seems to be a difference regarding the customs and who are represented in the burial ground even though they are from the same time and place, thereforethere will also be a comparisonbetween the different sites regarding the human remains and burial customs.The difference is seen mainly in the individuals, regarding both the male and female presence and also regarding the animals represented in the different graves. This may be connected to aborderlandphenomenonwere different traditions and customs were mixed and assimilated.This study contributeswith more knowledge of the time and place, both within the town and to Mälardalen/Bergslagenin general.

  • 3.
    Andersson, Ida
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Osteoarchaeological Research Laboratory.
    Gravar i Gränslandet: En osteoarkeologisk jämförelse mellan gravfält från yngre järnåldern i Västmanland2014Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Köping is a small town in Västmanland, which is situated in the westernmost part of Lake Mälaren and in the southeast of Bergslagen. Köping was established and received its rights as a town in 1474. However, archaeological findings show that Köping was a settlement in late prehistoric and early historic periods and continued to be an important place up until recent times. Due to the location Köping was a marketplace with connections and good fairways from all directions and most of all by Lake Mälaren. Ancient monuments and remains indicate that Köping were well established in the early Iron Age and mainly in the Vendel era in 550-800 A.D, which is the era in focus here. Even though there are many archaeological remains in and around Köping very little research has been done. There have been several excavations but there have been few further studies and close to no osteological analyzes. This paper will deal with four burial grounds which all were mostly excavated in the first half of the 20th century, and are briefly reported. The burial sites are all located in Köping with at the most 5 km from each other, and were all used during the Vendel era. Two of the sites, Jämmertuna and Kramsta, mainly have stone-settings with cremated bones. One of the sites is located next to a great tumulus called Ströbohög, and consists of smaller mounds and stone-settings. All with cremated bones. The last one is a burial site that is called Norsa which consists of both stone-settings with cremated bones and also burials containing boatgraves and chamber tombs. All of these burial customs are common in Mälardalen during this time. What is interesting is the location, inhumation of the cemeteries and also that they have not been used for a long period of time. A comparative study is presented of a similar but larger site in Tuna in Badelunda, Västerås, which is located about 40 km from Köping. This will be an osteoarchaeological study with the purpose to understand this character of the area during this time as the westernmost part of Lake Mälaren and as a part of Bergslagen. There seems to be a difference regarding the customs and who are represented in the burial ground even though they are from the same time and place, therefore there will also be a comparison between the different sites regarding the human remains and burial customs. The difference is seen mainly in the individuals, regarding both the male and female presence and also regarding the animals represented in the different graves. This may be connected to a borderland phenomenon were different traditions and customs were mixed and assimilated. This study contributes with more knowledge of the time and place, both within the town and to Mälardalen/Bergslagen in general. 

  • 4.
    Apel, Jan
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Osteoarchaeological Research Laboratory. Lund University, Sweden.
    Wallin, Paul
    Storå, Jan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Osteoarchaeological Research Laboratory.
    Possnert, Göran
    Early Holocene human population events on the island of Gotland in the Baltic Sea (9200-3800 cal. BP)2018In: Quaternary International, ISSN 1040-6182, E-ISSN 1873-4553, Vol. 465, p. 276-286Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The summed probability distribution of 162 radiocarbon dates from Gotland was analysed with reference to archaeological and environmental data in order to evaluate possible variations in settlement intensity on the island. The data indicated variations in demographic development on the island, with probably several different colonization events and external influences; the pioneer settlement reached the island around 9200 cal. BP. After the initial colonization, the radiocarbon dates were rather evenly distributed until around 7700–7600 cal. BP, then there was a drop in the number of dates between 8300 and 8000 cal. BP that may be associated with the 8200 cold event. A marked decline in the number of dates between 7600 and 6000 cal. BP may be associated initially with the Littorina I transgression, but this transgression cannot explain why the Late Mesolithic period is not well represented on Gotland: the climatic development was favourable but did not result in increased human activity. The number of radiocarbon dates indicated that the population size remained low until around 6000 cal. BP, after which there was a gradual increase that reached a first ‘threshold’ after 5600 cal. BP and a second ‘threshold’ after 4500 cal. BP. The first apparent population increase was associated with the appearance of the Funnel Beaker Culture (FBC) and the second with Pitted Ware Culture (PWC) complexes. A decline in the number of dates occurred after 4300 cal. BP, i.e. towards the Late Neolithic. There was an association between the frequency distributions of the radiocarbon dates and the number of stray finds from different time periods but any correlation was not straightforward.

  • 5.
    Bartosiewicz, Laszlo
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Osteoarchaeological Research Laboratory.
    A honfoglalás és kora Árpád-kori állattartás régészeti emlékei: Archaeological evidence of animal keeping in the time of the Hungarian Conquest and Period of the Árpád Dynasty2018In: Hétköznapok a honfoglalás korában / [ed] B. Sudár, Zs. Petkes, 2018, p. 52-58Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 6.
    Bartosiewicz, Laszlo
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Osteoarchaeological Research Laboratory.
    A régészeti állattan "állatorvosi lova"2018In: Sötét idők túlélői: A kontinuitás fogalma, kutatásának módszerei az 5–11. századi Kárpát-medence régészetében / [ed] T. K. Hága, B. Kolozsi, Debrecen: Déri Múzeum Régészeti Tár , 2018, p. 83-107Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 7.
    Bartosiewicz, Laszlo
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Osteoarchaeological Research Laboratory.
    Animal remains from the late medieval castellum of Őcsény-Oltovány, Southern Hungary2016In: “per sylvam et per lacus nimios” The Medieval and Ottoman Period in Southern Transdanubia, Southwest Hungary: The Contribution of the Natural Sciences / [ed] Gy. Kovács, Cs. Zatykó, Budapest: Institute of Archaeology Research Centre for the Humanities Hungarian Academy of Sciences , 2016, p. 155-176Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 8.
    Bartosiewicz, Laszlo
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Osteoarchaeological Research Laboratory.
    Animal remains from the Ottoman-Turkish palisaded fort at Barcs, Southwest Hungary2016In: “per sylvam et per lacus nimios” The Medieval and Ottoman Period in Southern Transdanubia, Southwest Hungary: The Contribution of the Natural Sciences / [ed] Gy. Kovács, Cs. Zatykó, Budapest: Institute of Archaeology Research Centre for the Humanities Hungarian Academy of Sciences , 2016, p. 181-252Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 9.
    Bartosiewicz, Laszlo
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Osteoarchaeological Research Laboratory.
    Animal Remains in the Avar cemetery of Szegvár-Szőlőkalja2018In: Lebenswelten zwischen Archäologie und Geschichte: Festschrift für Falko Daim zu seinem 65. Geburtstag / [ed] Jörg Drauschke et al., Mainz: Verlag des Römisch-Germanischen Zentralmuseums , 2018, p. 43-56Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 10.
    Bartosiewicz, Laszlo
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Osteoarchaeological Research Laboratory.
    Archaeology in Hungary 1948–19892017In: Archaeology of the Communist Era: A Political History of Archaeology of the 20th Century / [ed] Ludomir R. Lozny, New York: Springer, 2017, p. 195-233Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 11.
    Bartosiewicz, Laszlo
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Osteoarchaeological Research Laboratory.
    "Forever young": neoteny and design2018In: Annalen des Naturhistorischen Museums in Wien, ISSN 0255-0091, Vol. 120, p. 19-30Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 12.
    Bartosiewicz, Laszlo
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Osteoarchaeological Research Laboratory.
    Hungarian grey cattle: Parallels in constituting animal and human identities2018In: Interspecies Interactions: Animals and Humans between the Middle Ages and Modernity / [ed] Sarah Cockram, Andrew Wells, London: Routledge, 2018, p. 190-213Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 13.
    Bartosiewicz, Laszlo
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Osteoarchaeological Research Laboratory.
    Hunting injuries in prehistoric game2016In: Southeast Europe and Anatolia in prehistory : Essays in honor of Vassil Nikolov on his 65th anniversary / [ed] K. Bacvarov, R. Gleser, Bonn: Verlag Dr. Rudolf Habelt GMBH, 2016, p. 501-508Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 14.
    Bartosiewicz, Laszlo
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Osteoarchaeological Research Laboratory.
    Környezet okozta állatbetegségek a régészetben2016In: A Természet Világa, ISSN 0040-3717, p. 40-45, article id Ember és környezet kapcsolata a Kárpát-medencébenArticle in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 15.
    Bartosiewicz, Laszlo
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Osteoarchaeological Research Laboratory.
    Like a Headless Chicken: Meaning, Medium and Context in Medieval Urban Taphonomy2017In: Animaltown: beasts in medieval urban space / [ed] Alice M. Choyke, Gerhard Jaritz, Oxford: BAR Publishing , 2017, p. 19-26Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 16.
    Bartosiewicz, Laszlo
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Osteoarchaeological Research Laboratory.
    Resurrecting Roe Deer: Skeletal Weight Ratios At Prehistoric Paks–Gyapa, Hungary2017In: From Hunter-Gatherers to Farmers: Human adaptations at the end of the Pleistocene and the first part of the Holocene / [ed] Mărgărit, M. and Boroneanț, A., Targoviște: Editura Cetatea de Scaun , 2017, p. 465-481Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 17.
    Bartosiewicz, Laszlo
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Osteoarchaeological Research Laboratory.
    Taphonomy and Disease Prevalence in Animal Palaeopathology: The Proverbial “Veterinary Horse”2018In: Care or Neglect? Evidence of Animal Disease in Archaeology: proceedings of the 6th meeting of the Animal Palaeopathology Working Group of the International Council for Archaeozoology (ICAZ), Budapest, Hungary, 2016 / [ed] László Bartosiewicz, Erika Gál, Oxford: Oxbow Books, 2018, p. 185-207Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 18.
    Bartosiewicz, Laszlo
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Osteoarchaeological Research Laboratory.
    The ghost in the corridor…: Some remarks on “Animal Secondary Products”, edited by Haskel J. Greenfield2015In: Germania, ISSN 0016-8874, Vol. 93, p. 233-245Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 19.
    Bartosiewicz, Laszlo
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Osteoarchaeological Research Laboratory.
    The palaeopathology of wild mammals in archaeology = Vadon élő emlősállatok betegségei a régészetben2016In: Archeometriai Műhely, ISSN 1786-271X, Vol. 13, no 1, p. 19-30Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Domestication is known to have increased animal morbidity. Wild animals, however, should not be looked upon romantically like Jean-Jacques Rousseau’s “noble sauvage”, untainted by civilisation. Rare pathological lesions found on the bones of wild animals in archaeozoological assemblages, they offer valuable information both from a zoological and a archaeological point of view. In addition to discussing problems of sampling, this paper is a review of major factors such as taphonomy, environment, and heritability that determine the manifestation of disease in wild animals in archaeological assemblages. A simple classification, specifically developed for wild animals, is presented that helps better understand these conditions. Numerous examples from both the author’s own work and the broad base of international literature (especially on Europe and the Southwest Asia) are cited to help illustrate how disease is manifested on the bones of wild animals recovered from a variety of archaeological periods. The results of this paper show that although domestication undoubtedly brought about an increase in animal morbidity, depending on the chances of survival of a game species and the functional importance of the body part affected, a variety of pathological lesions regularly occur on the remains of wild animals as well.

  • 20.
    Bartosiewicz, Laszlo
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Osteoarchaeological Research Laboratory.
    Zooarchaeology in the Carpathian Basin and adjacent areas2017In: The Oxford Handbook of Zooarchaeology / [ed] Umberto Albarella, Mauro Rizzetto, Hannah Russ, Kim Vickers, Sarah Viner-Daniels, New York: Oxford University Press, 2017, p. 99-112Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The Carpathian Basin, situated between the Alps, the Carpathians, and the Dinaric Alps, has been a geographically and culturally diverse area throughout its history. Research intensity in all periods and places is likewise heterogeneous. A complete review of animal–human relationships is, thus, impossible. Following a historical overview of research, characteristic examples of animal exploitation between the Neolithic and the early eighteenth century will be highlighted. Special emphasis is placed on the way migrations and imperial politics impacted the composition of animal bone assemblages. The role of animals in self-representation and other forms of symbolic communication are also considered.

  • 21.
    Bartosiewicz, Laszlo
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Osteoarchaeological Research Laboratory.
    Zoological observations made on the brass jug from the Avar cemetery of Budakalász2017In: Die frühbyzantinische Messingkanne mit Jagdszenen von Budakalász (Ungarn) / [ed] Tivadar Vida, Budapest: MTA BTK Régészeti Intézet , 2017, p. 229-242Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 22.
    Bartosiewicz, Laszlo
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Osteoarchaeological Research Laboratory.
    Choyke, Alice M.
    Reynolds, Ffion
    Stag do: ritual implications of antler use in prehistory2017In: The Neolithic of Europe: papers in honour of Alasdair Whittle / [ed] Penny Bickle, Vicki Cummings, Daniela Hofmann, Joshua Pollard, Oxford: Oxbow Books, 2017, p. 107-119Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 23.
    Bartosiewicz, Laszlo
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Osteoarchaeological Research Laboratory.
    Lisk, Elicia
    Mammalian Remains2018In: Quedem Reports, ISSN 0793-4289, Vol. 10, p. 83-117Article, book review (Refereed)
  • 24.
    Bartosiewicz, Laszlo
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Osteoarchaeological Research Laboratory.
    Nyerges, Éva A.
    Biller, Anna Z.
    Palaeopathology at the Eneolithic Tell Settlement of Polyanitsa (NE Bulgaria)2018In: Care or Neglect? Evidence of Animal Disease in Archaeology: proceedings of the 6th meeting of the Animal Palaeopathology Working Group of the International Council for Archaeozoology (ICAZ), Budapest, Hungary, 2016 / [ed] László Bartosiewicz, Erika Gál, Oxford: Oxbow Books, 2018, p. 23-44Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 25.
    Bartosiewicz, Laszlo
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Osteoarchaeological Research Laboratory.
    Nyerges, Éva Ágnes
    Prehistoric Animal Remains from Grotta Scaloria2016In: Archaeology of Grotta Scaloria: Ritual in Neolithic Southeast Italy / [ed] Ernestine S. Elster, Eugenia Isetti, John Robb, Antonella Traverso, Los Angeles: University of New Mexico Press , 2016, p. 75-90Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 26.
    Bartosiewicz, Laszlo
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Osteoarchaeological Research Laboratory.
    Swift, Keith
    Coleman Carter, Joseph
    Animal Remains from the Sanctuary and Adjacent Areas at Pantanello2018In: The chora of Metaponto 7: The Greek Sanctuary at Pantanello, volume I : The excavation and site / [ed] Joseph Coleman Carter, Keith Swift, Austin: University of Texas Press, 2018, p. 447-464Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 27.
    Bartosiewicz, László
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Osteoarchaeological Research Laboratory.
    Animal remains from the Langobard cemetery of Ménfőcsanak (NW Hungary)2015In: Antaeus, ISSN 0238-0218, Vol. 33, p. 249-264Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 28.
    Bartosiewicz, László
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Osteoarchaeological Research Laboratory.
    “Every skin teeth aint a laugh”: Medieval leopard find from Hungary2015In: Hungarian Archaeology, ISSN 2416-0296, p. 1-8Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The unexpected recovery of a worked skull fragment from a large male leopard at the medieval urban site of Segesd–Pékóföld during the 1980s raises important questions. These concern zoogeographical distribution, as well as issues of manufacturing, status, and the circulation of luxury goods. In recent years these aspects of the special artefact could be revisited on the basis of an increasing body of data and new insights into the symbolic use of this artefact in high-status self-representation.

  • 29.
    Bartosiewicz, László
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Osteoarchaeological Research Laboratory.
    János Matolcsi and the development of archaeozoology [Matolcsi János és a régészeti állattan fejlődése]2015In: Hungarian Grey, Racka, Mangalitsa [Szürkék, rackák, mangalicák]: Papers presented at the international conference honouring János Matolcsi, 25–26 November 2013 / [ed] Andrea Kőrösi, Ágnes Szotyori-Nagy, Budapest: Museum and Library of Hungarian Agriculture , 2015, p. 29-36Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 30.
    Bartosiewicz, László
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Osteoarchaeological Research Laboratory.
    Szívszorító hasonlóságok: Gondolatok a rituális állatvágás kapcsán2015In: Ókor, ISSN 1417-8532, Vol. 4, p. 77-81Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 31.
    Bartosiewicz, László
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Osteoarchaeological Research Laboratory.
    Lillie, Malcolm
    Subsistence Practices in Central and Eastern Europe.2015In: The Oxford Handbook of Neolithic Europe. / [ed] Chris Fowler, Jan Harding and Daniela Hofmann, Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2015, p. 411-428Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 32. Boethius, Adam
    et al.
    Storå, Jan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Osteoarchaeological Research Laboratory.
    Hongslo Vala, Cecilie
    Apel, Jan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Osteoarchaeological Research Laboratory. Lund University, Sweden.
    The importance of freshwater fish in Early Holocene subsistence: Exemplified with the human colonization of the island of Gotland in the Baltic basin2017In: Journal of Archaeological Science: Reports, ISSN 2352-409X, E-ISSN 2001-1199, Vol. 13, p. 625-634Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper we explore the subsistence economy of the Mesolithic pioneers on the island of Gotland in the Baltic basin, in order to evaluate the importance of freshwater fish to the Early Holocene human population. By analysing faunal remains, the distribution of 14C dates and the location of the settlement sites, we argue that earlier assumptions concerning the importance of marine mammals to the early human populations should be reconsidered. We suggest that the pioneering settlers of Gotland relied on fish to a significant extent. Radiocarbon dates taken from human bones are skewed by a freshwater reservoir effect, which can be used as an indirect indication of the significance of freshwater fish. The numerous, overgrowing lakes on the island, with their extensive biomass production and large amounts of freshwater fish, provided an important subsistence base. Even if the faunal assemblages that have survived are dominated by seal bones, the hunting season for seals was limited and the hunters mostly targeted young seals. Thus, the importance of seal have previously been overestimated and it appears that the human use of marine resources on Gotland was more limited and related to raw material needs rather than dietary necessity or specialization. Although presented as a case study; the results highlight the need to identify a freshwater fish diet among ancient foragers on a larger scale, as implications thereof can fundamentally change how foraging societies are perceived.

  • 33. Bonsall, Clive
    et al.
    Cook, Gordon
    Pickard, Catriona
    McSweeney, Kathleen
    Sayle, Kerry
    Bartosiewicz, Laszlo
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Osteoarchaeological Research Laboratory.
    Radovanovic, Ivana
    Higham, Thomas
    Soficaru, Andrei
    Boroneant, Adina
    Food for Thought: Re-Assessing Mesolithic Diets in the Iron Gates2015In: Radiocarbon, ISSN 0033-8222, E-ISSN 1945-5755, Vol. 57, no 4, p. 689-699Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Stable isotope ratios of carbon, nitrogen, and sulfur in human bone collagen are used routinely to aid in the reconstruction of ancient diets. Isotopic analysis of human remains from sites in the Iron Gates section of the Lower Danube Valley has led to conflicting interpretations of Mesolithic diets in this key region of southeast Europe. One view (Bonsall et al. 1997, 2004) is that diets were based mainly on riverine resources throughout the Mesolithic. A competing hypothesis (Nehlich et al. 2010) argues that Mesolithic diets were more varied with at least one Early Mesolithic site showing an emphasis on terrestrial resources, and riverine resources only becoming dominant in the Later Mesolithic. The present article revisits this issue, discussing the stable isotope data in relation to archaeozoological and radiocarbon evidence.

  • 34. Bonsall, Clive
    et al.
    Macklin, Mark
    Boronean, Adina
    Pickard, Catriona
    Bartosiewicz, Laszlo
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Osteoarchaeological Research Laboratory.
    Cook, Gordon
    Higham, Thomas
    Rapid climate change and radiocarbon discontinuities in the Mesolithic-Early Neolithic settlement record of the Iron Gates: cause or coincidence?2016In: Climate and cultural change in prehistoric Europe and the Near East / [ed] Peter F. Biehl, Olivier P. Nieuwenhuyse, Albany: State University of New York, 2016, p. 195-210Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 35.
    Economou, Christos
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Kjellström, Anna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Osteoarchaeological Research Laboratory.
    Lidén, Kerstin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Panagopoulos, Ioannis
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Ancient-DNA reveals an Asian type of Mycobacterium leprae in medieval Scandinavia2013In: Journal of Archaeological Science, ISSN 0305-4403, E-ISSN 1095-9238, Vol. 40, no 1, p. 465-470Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Leprosy is a chronic infection of the skin and peripheral nerves caused by the pathogen Mycobacterium leprae. Its impact on human populations and societies of the past as well as its phylogeographic patterns around the world – at least in modern times – has been well documented. This slow growing bacterium has been shown to exist in distinct ‘SNP types’ that occur in relatively defined parts of the globe. The routes that the disease followed in the past are, however, still uncertain. This study of ancient-DNA typing of archaeological human remains from Sweden dated to early Medieval times provides genetic evidence that a transmission of M. leprae ‘SNP subtype’ 2G – found mainly in Asia – took or had already taken place at that time from the Middle East to Scandinavia. This finding is unique in the history of leprosy in Europe. All human specimens from this continent – both modern and ancient – that have been tested to date showed that the one responsible for the infection strains of M. leprae belong to ‘SNP type’ 3, whereas our results show that there were some European populations that were hosts to bacteria representing ‘SNP type’ 2 of the species as well.

  • 36. Edberg, Rune
    et al.
    Karlsson, Johnny
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Osteoarchaeological Research Laboratory.
    Bone skates and young people in Birka and Sigtuna2016In: Fornvännen, ISSN 0015-7813, E-ISSN 1404-9430, Vol. 111, no 1, p. 7-16Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    679 bone skates from two important sites in the Stockholm area were examined. Cattle bones dominate in Birka (8th to loth centuries AD), while horse bones are more numerous in Sigtuna (10th to 13th centuries AD). The average length of the skates is c. 20 cm in Birka and c. 22 cm in Sigtuna. It seems that in Birka, bone skating was practiced mostly by children. In Sigtuna it also became popular among adolescents and perhaps young adults. Ethnological analogies strongly support the interpretation of bone skates as toys and sporting equipment.

  • 37.
    Eriksson, Gunilla
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Frei, Karin Margarita
    Howcroft, Rachel
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Gummesson, Sara
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Osteoarchaeological Research Laboratory.
    Molin, Fredrik
    Lidén, Kerstin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Frei, Robert
    Hallgren, Fredrik
    Diet and mobility among Mesolithic hunter-gatherers in Motala (Sweden) - The isotope perspective2018In: Journal of Archaeological Science: Reports, ISSN 2352-409X, E-ISSN 2001-1199, Vol. 17, p. 904-918Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Recent excavations at the sites of Strandvägen and Kanaljorden in Motala, Eastern Central Sweden, have unearthed complex and varied funerary remains from the Mesolithic. The two sites are situated on opposite banks of the river Motala Ström. While geographically close and roughly covering the same time span (c. 8000–7000 cal. BP), the funerary remains reveal differences and similarities in the treatment of the dead between the two localities. While at Strandvägen human bones were mostly found either scattered along the river bed or in inhumation graves, Kanaljorden contains wetland depositions of disarticulated skulls. We have conducted multi-isotope analyses of δ13C, δ15N, δ34S and 87Sr/86Sr of human and animal remains with the aim of reconstructing the dietary patterns, geographic provenance and mobility of the interred. A series of faunal reference samples and, in the case of 87Sr/86Sr, soil samples have been analysed in order to establish relevant isotopic baselines. The results show a protein intake dominated by aquatic resources, probably consisting of both freshwater and marine fish in varied proportions. The strontium isotope data indicate an interesting distinction between the individuals buried on either side of the river Motala Ström. Five out of six sampled individuals from Strandvägen have isotope ratios consistent with a local provenance, whereas ratios from seven out of eight Kanaljorden individuals indicate a non-local origin. The δ34S analysis proved problematic as a majority of the samples appear to be affected by diagenesis. This is probably the result of contamination by exogenous sulphur from surrounding fluvial and lacustrine sediments, as has previously been reported from other waterlogged sites.

  • 38.
    Ersmark, Erik
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Zoology. Swedish Museum of Natural History, Sweden.
    Baryshnikov, Gennady
    Higham, Tom
    Argant, Alain
    Döppes, Doris
    Germonpré, Mietje
    Lidén, Kerstin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Lipecki, Grzegorz
    Marciszak, Adrian
    Pacher, Martina
    Storå, Jan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Osteoarchaeological Research Laboratory.
    Sabol, Martin
    Valdiosera, Christina
    Villaluenga, Aritza
    Stewart, John
    Dalén, Love
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Zoology.
    Genetic revolutions and northern survival during the last glacial maximum in European brown bearsManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 39.
    Fahlander, Fredrik
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies.
    Kjellström, Anna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Osteoarchaeological Research Laboratory.
    Beyond Sight: Archaeologies of Sensory Perception2010In: Making Sense of Things: Archaeologies of Sensory Perception / [ed] Fredrik Fahlander & Anna Kjellström, Stockholm: Univ. , 2010, 200, p. 1-13Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 40.
    Fornander, Elin
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Olander, Maria
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Osteoarchaeological Research Laboratory.
    Arkeologisk undersökning av Raä 447 i Korsnäs, Grödinge socken, Södermanland september 20092010Report (Other academic)
  • 41. Fraser, Magdalena
    et al.
    Sanchez-Quinto, Federico
    Evans, Jane
    Storå, Jan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Osteoarchaeological Research Laboratory.
    Götherström, Anders
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Wallin, Paul
    Knutsson, Kjel
    Jakobsson, Mattias
    New insights on cultural dualism and population structure in the Middle Neolithic Funnel Beaker culture on the island of Gotland2018In: Journal of Archaeological Science: Reports, ISSN 2352-409X, E-ISSN 2001-1199, Vol. 17, p. 325-334Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In recent years it has been shown that the Neolithization of Europe was partly driven by migration of farming groups admixing with local hunter-gatherer groups as they dispersed across the continent. However, little research has been done on the cultural duality of contemporaneous foragers and farming populations in the same region. Here we investigate the demographic history of the Funnel Beaker culture [Trichterbecherkultur or TRB, c. 4000–2800 cal BCE], and the sub-Neolithic Pitted Ware culture complex [PWC, c. 3300–2300 cal BCE] during the Nordic Middle Neolithic period on the island of Gotland, Sweden. We use a multidisciplinary approach to investigate individuals buried in the Ansarve dolmen, the only confirmed TRB burial on the island. We present new radiocarbon dating, isotopic analyses for diet and mobility, and mitochondrial DNA haplogroup data to infer maternal inheritance. We also present a new Sr-baseline of 0.71208 ± 0.0016 for the local isotope variation. We compare and discuss our findings together with that of contemporaneous populations in Sweden and the North European mainland.

    The radiocarbon dating and Strontium isotopic ratios show that the dolmen was used between c. 3300–2700 cal BCE by a population which displayed local Sr-signals. Mitochondrial data show that the individuals buried in the Ansarve dolmen had maternal genetic affinity to that of other Early and Middle Neolithic farming cultures in Europe, distinct from that of the contemporaneous PWC on the island. Furthermore, they exhibited a strict terrestrial and/or slightly varied diet in contrast to the strict marine diet of the PWC. The findings indicate that two different contemporary groups coexisted on the same island for several hundred years with separate cultural identity, lifestyles, as well as dietary patterns.

  • 42. Fraser, Magdalena
    et al.
    Sjödin, Per
    Sanchez-Quinto, Federico
    Evans, Jane
    Svedjemo, Gustaf
    Knutsson, Kjel
    Götherström, Anders
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Jakobsson, Mattias
    Wallin, Paul
    Storå, Jan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Osteoarchaeological Research Laboratory.
    The stone cist conundrum: A multidisciplinary approach to investigate Late Neolithic/Early Bronze Age population demography on the island of Gotland2018In: Journal of Archaeological Science: Reports, ISSN 2352-409X, E-ISSN 2001-1199, Vol. 20, p. 324-337Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Late Neolithic period in Scandinavia [LN, c. 2350-1700 cal BCE] marks a time of considerable changes in settlement patterns, economy, and material culture. This shift also lays the foundation for the demographic developments in the Early Bronze Age [EBA, c. 1700-1100 cal BCE]. However, little is presently known regarding the developments from these time-periods on the island of Gotland in the Baltic Sea. During the Middle Neolithic period [MN, c. 3300-2350 cal BCE], Gotland was inhabited by groups associated with the Funnel Beaker culture [TRB, c. 4000-2700 cal BCE], and the sub-Neolithic Pitted Ware culture [PWC, c. 3300-2300 cal BCE]. Some indications of connections with the Bathe Axe/Corded Ware cultures [BAC/CWC, c. 2800-2300 cal BCE] have also been found, but no typical BAC/CWC burials have been located on the island to date. Here, we investigate the chronological and internal relationship of twenty-three individuals buried in four LN/EBA stone cist burials; Haffinds, Hagur, Suderkvie, and Utalskog on Gotland. We present eleven mitochondrial genomes [from 23 X to 1271 X coverage], and twenty-three new radiocarbon dates, as well as stable isotope data for diet. We examine the local Sr-baseline range for Gotland, and present new Sr-data to discuss mobility patterns of the individuals. The genetic results are compared and discussed in light of earlier cultural periods from Gotland [TRB and PWC], and CWC from the European continent, as well as contemporaneous LN secondary burials in the MN Ansarve dolmen. We find that all burials were used into the EBA, but only two of the cists showed activity already during the LN. We also see some mobility to Gotland during the LN/EBA period based on Strontium and mitochondrial data. We see a shift in the dietary pattern compared to the preceding period on the island [TRB and PWC], and the two LN individuals from the Ansarve dolmen exhibited different dietary and mobility patterns compared to the individuals from the LN/EBA stone cist burials. We find that most of the cist burials were used by individuals local to the area of the burials, with the exception of the large LN/EBA Haffinds cist burial which showed higher levels of mobility. Our modeling of ancestral mitochondrial contribution from chronologically older individuals recovered in the cultural contexts of TRB, PWC and CWC show that the best model is a 55/45 mix of CWC and TRB individuals. A 3-way model with a slight influx from PWC [5%] also had a good fit. This is difficult to reconcile with the current archaeological evidence on the island. We suggest that the maternal CWC/TRB contribution we see in the local LN/EBA individuals derives from migrants after the Scandinavian MN period, which possible also admixed with smaller local groups connected with the PWC. Further genomic analyses of these groups on Gotland will help to clarify the demographic history during the MN to EBA time periods.

  • 43. Galik, Alfred
    et al.
    Haidvogl, Gertrud
    Bartosiewicz, László
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Osteoarchaeological Research Laboratory.
    Guti, Gabor
    Fish remains as a source to reconstruct long-term changes of fish communities in the Austrian and Hungarian Danube2015In: Aquatic Sciences, ISSN 1015-1621, E-ISSN 1420-9055, Vol. 77, no 3, p. 337-354Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 44.
    Glykou, Aikaterini
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Eriksson, Gunilla
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Storå, Jan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Osteoarchaeological Research Laboratory.
    Schmitt, M.
    Kooijman, E.
    Lidén, Kerstin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Intra- and inter-tooth variation in strontium isotope ratios from prehistoric seals by laser ablation multi-collector inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry2018In: Rapid Communications in Mass Spectrometry, ISSN 0951-4198, E-ISSN 1097-0231, Vol. 32, no 15, p. 1215-1224Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    RationaleStrontium isotope ratios (Sr-87/Sr-86) in modern-day marine environments are considered to be homogeneous (0.7092). However, in the Baltic Sea, the Sr ratios are controlled by mixing seawater and continental drainage from major rivers discharging into the Baltic. This pilot study explores if variations in Sr can be detected in marine mammals from archaeological sites in the Baltic Sea. Methods(87)Sr/Sr-86 ratios were measured in tooth enamel from three seal species by laser ablation multi-collector inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-MC-ICP-MS). The method enables micro-sampling of solid materials. This is the first time that the method has been applied to marine samples from archaeological collections. ResultsThe analyses showed inter-tooth Sr-87/Sr-86 variation suggesting that different ratios can be detected in different regions of the Baltic Sea. Furthermore, the intra-tooth variation suggests possible different geographic origin or seasonal movement of seals within different regions in the Baltic Sea through their lifetime. ConclusionsThe method was successfully applied to archaeological marine samples showing that: (1) the Sr-87/Sr-86 ratio in marine environments is not uniform, (2) Sr-87/Sr-86 differences might reflect differences in ecology and life history of different seal species, and (3) archaeological mobility studies based on Sr-87/Sr-86 ratios in humans should therefore be evaluated together with diet reconstruction.

  • 45. Grzybowska, Milena
    et al.
    Hamilton-Dyer, Sheila
    Pickard, Catriona
    Bartosiewicz, Laszlo
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Osteoarchaeological Research Laboratory. University of Edinburgh, Scotland.
    Bonsall, Clive
    Faunal remains from the 1982–83 investigations2016In: Archaeology and Environment on the North Sea Littoral: A case study from Low Hauxley / [ed] Clive Waddington, Clive Bonsall, Derbyshire: Archaeological Research Services Ltd. , 2016, p. 169-190Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 46.
    Gummesson, Sara
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Osteoarchaeological Research Laboratory.
    Molin, Fredrik
    Points of Bone and Antler from the Late Mesolithic settlement in Motala, eastern central Sweden2018In: Working at the sharp end: from bone and antler to Early Mesolithic life in Northern Europe / [ed] D. Groß, H. Lübke, J. Meadows, D. Jantzen, 2018Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Excavations at Motala, eastern central Sweden, have yielded a large and diverse material of osseous tools dating from the Late Mesolithic, c. 6000-4500 cal BC. The assembled collection comprises some 1500 pieces. About half of the identified tool types consist of different types of bone points of which barbed points dominate. The utilized raw material was predominantly red deer (Cervus elaphus) metatarsals and antler but other element do occur, as do bones from moose (Alces alces) and roe deer (Capreolus capreolus). More than 450 fragments of barbed points have been identified and interpreted as leister points or harpoon heads. The morphology of the barbed points were classified according to the general appearance of the corpus of points (setting of barbs) but more specifically from the morphology of basal ends. Aside from harpoons eight different groups of leister points were defined. The leister points are interpreted as prongs or single hafted points for fish-spears. Plain bone points are the second largest group, and may be sorted into several types, primarily interpreted as projectiles like arrowheads. Small bullet-like arrowheads and some rhombic points as well as club-shaped points of antler are also present. Slotted points appear in two different types either with uni- or bilateral edges. Based on the collection from the site Strandvägen and with help of morphological groups as well as a large number of radiocarbon dates, we have identified a change in the utilization of fishing implements at c. 5000 cal BC. The change is detected as a discontinuation in the use of barbed leister points and a possible shift from bilateral to unilateral slotted points in addition to overall decreasing human activities, despite a continued presence at the site.

  • 47.
    Gummesson, Sara
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Osteoarchaeological Research Laboratory.
    Molin, Fredrik
    The Mesolithic cemetery at Strandvägen, Motala, in eastern central Sweden2016In: Mesolithic burials: rites, symbols and social organisation of early postglacial communities: international conference, Halle (Saale), Germany, 18th-21st September 2013 / [ed] Judith M. Grünberg, Bernhard Gramsch, Lars Larsson, Jörg Orschiedt, Harald Meller, Halle (Saale): Landesamt für Denkmalpflege und Archäologie Sachsen-Anhalt, Landesmuseum für Vorgeschichte , 2016, Vol. 13/I, p. 145-159Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 48.
    Gummesson, Sara
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Osteoarchaeological Research Laboratory.
    Molin, Fredrik
    Sjöström, Arne
    The spatial organization of bone craft during the Middle and Late Mesolithic: Patterns of bone tool production at Ringsjöholm and Strandvägen in SwedenManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper focuses on the spatial distribution of osseous tool production debitage from two Mesolithic sites in Sweden, Ringsjöholm and Strandvägen, with well-preserved faunal remains including high numbers of osseous artifacts. Local production of osseous tools on both sites has generated a variety of identifiable unfinished products and debitage deriving from complete chains of production, including unmodified bones, various kinds of debitage and finished products. Identified categories include: anatomical and technical blanks, removed epiphyses, bone flakes and preforms. Identification of species and element distributions show that antler and metapodial bone from red deer was the preferred raw material. Technological characteristics of the osseous craft and different stages of production have been identified. Spatial statistical analyses confirm that different stages of osseous tool production were organized within separate areas of the sites and that larger items were discarded in the water along the shorelines adjacent to the settlements. Interestingly, blanks and preforms seem to have been stored under water for future use. At Strandvägen demarcated clusters of bone flakes in association with dwellings represent craft areas, or "bone knapping floors" where production was more intense than in other areas.

  • 49.
    Gummesson, Sara
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Osteoarchaeological Research Laboratory.
    Molin, Fredrik
    Storå, Jan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Osteoarchaeological Research Laboratory.
    Taphonomy, bone surface characteristics and assemblage history: Finding Mesolithic bone depositions at Strandvägen, Motala2017In: Journal of Archaeological Science: Reports, ISSN 2352-409X, E-ISSN 2001-1199, Vol. 13, p. 11-25Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Through taphonomic analyses, in this studywe evaluate bones surface characteristics and differences in bone accumulation on a Mesolithic settlement site, in Eastern Middle Sweden. The assemblage consists of faunal remains fromthe Mesolithic but also fromactivities dating to historical periods. All bones fromthe site, including indeterminate fragments, were analysed. Variation in bones surface characteristics were registered according to a set of taphonomic data, based on previously published studies. The variation were categorized as different texture scores and evaluated against species representation, radiocarbon datings and spatial distribution. The study underlines the potential of methodological approaches to taphonomic data and underlines the importance of including indeterminate fragments when studying human utilization of bones. The results present strong correlations between different species, bone tools and specific surface textures. It shows that a large part of the assemblage is of Mesolithic origin but also that activities dating to post-Mesolithic periods have contributed to the assemblage accumulation. Spatial analyses of the different surface textures helped to identify and separate Mesolithic activity areas of the site, thus providing an understanding of the spatial organization at intra site level, at the settlement of Strandvägen.

  • 50.
    Gummesson, Sara
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Osteoarchaeological Research Laboratory.
    Sundberg, Rolf
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Mathematics.
    Knutsson, Helena
    Zetterlund, Peter
    Molin, Fredrik
    Knutsson, Kjel
    Lithic Raw Material Economy in the Mesolithic: An Experimental Test of Edged Tool Efficiency and Durability in Bone Tool Production2017In: Lithic Technology, ISSN 0197-7261, Vol. 42, no 4, p. 140-154Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The foundation of this paper is lithic economy with a focus on the actual use of different lithic raw materials for tasks at hand. Our specific focus is on the production of bone tools during the Mesolithic. The lithic and osseous assemblages from Strandvägen, Motala, in east-central Sweden provide the archaeological background for the study. Based on a series of experiments we evaluate the efficiency and durability of different tool edges of five lithic raw materials: Cambrian flint, Cretaceous flint, mylonitic quartz, quartz, and porphyry, each used to whittle bone. The results show that flint is the most efficient of the raw materials assessed. Thus, a non-local raw material offers complements of functional characteristics for bone working compared to locally available quartz and mylonitic quartz. This finding provides a new insight into lithic raw material distribution in the region, specifically for bone tool production on site.

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