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  • 1. Ahl, Helene
    et al.
    Berglund, Karin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Business School, Management & Organisation.
    Pettersson, Katarina
    Sköld, Birgitta
    Tillmar, Malin
    Entrepreneurship in rural areas: The role of women?2017Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 2. Ahl, Helene
    et al.
    Berglund, Karin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Business School, Management & Organisation.
    Pettersson, Katarina
    Tillmar, Malin
    Can government support both women and entrepreneurship?2014Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 3. Ahl, Helene
    et al.
    Berglund, Karin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Business School, Management & Organisation.
    Pettersson, Katarina
    Tillmar, Malin
    Entrepreneurship for equality?2013Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 4. Ahl, Helene
    et al.
    Berglund, Karin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Business School, Management & Organisation.
    Pettersson, Katarina
    Tillmar, Malin
    Is institutional support for women’s entrepreneurship feminist?2014In: GWO2014 Book of abstracts: GWO 8th Biennial International Interdisciplinary conference, Wiley-Blackwell, 2014Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 5. Ahl, Helene
    et al.
    Berglund, Karin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Business School, Management & Organisation.
    Pettersson, Katarina
    Tillmar, Malin
    Women’s entrepreneurship in rural areas: A literature review.2017Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 6. Alkhaled-Studholme, Sophie
    et al.
    Berglund, Karin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Business School, Management & Organisation.
    And now I’m free’: Women’s empowerment and emancipation through entrepreneurship in Saudi Arabia and Sweden2018In: Entrepreneurship and Regional Development, ISSN 0898-5626, E-ISSN 1464-5114, Vol. 30, no 7-8, p. 877-900Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Critical perspectives have called for the study of women’s entrepreneurship as a route to social change. This ‘social turn’ claims women are empowered and/or emancipated through entrepreneurship with limited problematisation of how these interchangeably used concepts operate. Using an institutional perspective in combination with a narrative approach, we investigate women entrepreneurs’ life stories on their ‘road to freedom’ where entrepreneurial activity enables them to ‘break free’ from particular gendered constraints. Through juxtaposing women’s narratives in the contexts of Saudi Arabia and Sweden, the relationship between empowerment and emancipation is disentangled and (re)conceptualised. The findings distinguish between empowerment narrated as individual practices to achieve freedom for the self within institutional structures and emancipation as narrated as a wish to challenge and change structures of power and reach collative freedom. The yearning for collective emancipation propels women’s stories of entrepreneurship by raising expectations for entrepreneurship as a vehicle for institutional change. Such stories may fascinate and inspire others to engage in entrepreneurial endeavours to become empowered, but whether they reach emancipation remains an empirical question to be answered. The performative dimension of entrepreneurial narratives is, however, their ability to turn emancipation into an (un)reachable object of desire, with a quest for even more individual empowerment and entrepreneurial activity, at the same time excluding other forms of human conduct as conducive for change.

  • 7. Alkhaled-Studholme, Sophie
    et al.
    Berglund, Karin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Business School, Management & Organisation.
    Reconceptualising ‘freedom and power’ in entrepreneurship discourse: examining motivations and experiences of female entrepreneurs in Saudi Arabia and Sweden2014Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 8. Alkhaled-Studholme, Sophie
    et al.
    Berglund, Karin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Business School, Management & Organisation.
    The Quest for Empowerment and Emancipation Through Entrepreneurship2017Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 9. Alkhaled-Studholme, Sophie
    et al.
    Berglund, Karin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Business School, Management & Organisation.
    Women's Empowerment and Emancipation Through Entrepreneurship in Saudi Arabia and Sweden2018In: , 2018Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 10. Alvehus, Johan
    et al.
    Jensen, Tommy
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Business School, Management & Organisation.
    Organisation2015 (ed. 1)Book (Other academic)
  • 11. Andersson, Susanne
    et al.
    Berglund, Karin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Business School, Management & Organisation.
    PART I: Policies for Innovation2012In: Promoting Innovation: Policies, practices and procedures / [ed] Susanne Andersson, Karin Berglund, Ewa Gunnarsson, Élisabeth Sundin, Stockholm: Vinnova , 2012, p. 21-24Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 12. Andersson, Susanne
    et al.
    Berglund, Karin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Business School, Management & Organisation.
    Granat Thorslund, Jennie
    Gunnarsson, Ewa
    Sundin, Elisabeth
    Introduction2012In: Promoting innovation: Policies, practices and procedures / [ed] Susanne Andersson, Karin Berglund, Ewa Gunnarsson, Elisabeth Sundin, Stockholm: Vinnova , 2012, p. 9-19Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 13. Annika, Skoglund
    et al.
    Berglund, Karin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Business School, Management & Organisation.
    Entrepreneurship and the entrepreneurial self: Creating
 alternatives through entrepreneurship education?2018In: Revitalizing entrepreneurship education: Adopting a critical approach in the classroom / [ed] Karin Berglund, Karen Verduijn, Karen, Oxon: Routledge, 2018, p. 158-177Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 14. Annika, Skoglund
    et al.
    Berglund, Karin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Business School, Management & Organisation.
    Studying “Openness” with “Closeness”: A videography of Prezi’s alternative entrepreneurship2018In: Nordicom Information, ISSN 0349-5949, Vol. 40, no 1, p. 86-90Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

     How can we study a company’s call for “openness” and ambition to create an alternative form of entrepreneurship? Th is article introduces a videography of the Hungarian company Prezi, with a focus on their eff orts to nurture an internal organisational culture defi ned by openness, as well as a desire to address the lack of corporate social engagement and openness in Hungarian society. We follow Prezi’s work with the Roma population to better understand how the company’s social value creation aff ects the employees, and to problematise how videography facilitates “closeness” and thereby the sharing of sensibility and co-experience of such an abstract ability as openness.

  • 15.
    Aziz, Najibullah
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Business School, Management & Organisation.
    Smart Devices as U-Learning Tools: Key Factors Influencing Users’ Intention2015Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    There was a lack of knowledge about the user’s acceptance of smart devices as ubiquitous learning (u-learning) tools at higher education institutions in Sweden. As the mobile technology grows, the demand for mobile devices, particularly smart devices increases as well. With the increase in the usage of smart devices, the higher education institutions provide mobile learning platforms to attract more customers in the competitive industry of education. Thus, understanding the key factors from the perspectives of end-users is important for the institutions to survive in the competitive market. This study explores and explains Behavioral and Continuance intentions of students regarding the acceptance and usage of smart devices (Smartphones and Personal Digital Assistants or PDA) as u-learning tools. Key factors related to the users’ intentions to accept and continue using smart devices as u-learning tools were identified and hypothesized in the Swedish context. Ten hypotheses were suggested based on TAM, UTAUT, and ECT. To achieve the aim and objective of this study, a quantitative approach was chosen, and a survey strategy based on purposive and convenience sampling techniques were used. A web-based questionnaire on five-points Likert Scale was designed to collect the required data. 115 (96 valid) students answered the questionnaire. The collected data were used to conduct statistical operations in SPSS. Five hypotheses were supported, and the other five were not. The findings suggest that Performance Expectancy, Perceived Mobility value, Confirmation, and Satisfaction positively influence both Behavioral and Continuance Intentions of students to accept and continue using smart devices as u-learning tools. According to the findings, Confirmation and Satisfaction from ECT can be included as separate constructs in UTAUT and UTAUT2. Higher education institutions planning to have (and those that already have) learning platforms, compatible with smart devices, can benefit from the findings. Higher education institutions can also design their u-learning platforms according to the Performance Expectancy, Perceived Mobility value, Confirmation, and Satisfaction of the students.

  • 16. Bailey, Nick
    et al.
    Kleinhans, Reinout
    Lindbergh, Jessica
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Business School, Management & Organisation.
    The Implications of Schumpeter's Theories of Innovation for the Role, Organisation and Impact of Community-Based Social Enterprise in Three European Countries2018In: Journal of Entrepreneurial and Organizational Diversity (JEOD), ISSN 1311-5065, E-ISSN 2225-1219, Vol. 7, no 1, p. 14-36Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Social enterprises, with strong ties to local areas and communities, have been a growing phenomenon in many European countries at least since the financial crisis of 2007-2008 and the resulting retrenchment of state involvement in welfare provision. The paper draws on the empirical findings from nine case studies of community-based social enterprises (CBSE) in three countries which were investigated in depth in our study. Our objective is to use Schumpeter’s work as a lens to assess the effects of social innovation on different aspects of this type of social organisation. Thus, we aim to address the questions: (i) to what extent can CBSEs be considered as a form of social innovation and how does this innovation arise in terms of role, organisation and impact of CBSEs? (ii) What are the similarities and differences between CBSEs in the three selected European countries? And (iii) how far does Schumpeter’s conceptual framework of “creative destruction” provide insights into the process of organisational change in this form of social enterprise? In doing so we identify and discuss a series of innovations in organisation, project selection and delivery and conclude with insights relating to Schumpeter’s theory of “creative destruction”.

  • 17.
    Bay, Thomas
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, School of Business, Management & Organisation.
    Sjödin, Ulrika
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, School of Business.
    McGoun, Elton G.
    Bucknell University.
    Gaming the System2011In: International Journal of Critical Accounting, ISSN Online : 1757-9856, Print : 1757-9848, Vol. 3, no 1, p. 5-17Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper explores whether financial markets are games, using exchange traded derivatives, those quintessential speculative instruments, as the primary vehicle. The phrase “gaming the system” usually means taking advantage of the system; that is to say, specifically turning some-thing performing a productive social function to one’s own enjoyable ends. But “gaming the system” can also mean generally transforming a system with productive purposes into one whose purpose is enjoyment. Some might say that this is just what has occurred in recent years to financial markets with the explosion in derivatives.

  • 18.
    Bengtsson, Lars
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Business School, Management & Organisation.
    Holmqvist, Mikael
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Business School, Management & Organisation.
    Larsson, Rikard
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Business School, Management & Organisation.
    Strategiska allianser: Från marknadsmisslyckande till lärande samarbete1998Book (Other academic)
    Abstract
  • 19.
    Berglund, Karin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Business School, Management & Organisation.
    Bent Flyvbjerg, Todd Landman & Sanford Schram (Eds.). (2012) Real social science: Applied phronesis. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 308 pages2015In: Scandinavian Journal of Management, ISSN 0956-5221, E-ISSN 1873-3387, Vol. 31, no 3, p. 455-456Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 20.
    Berglund, Karin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Business School, Management & Organisation.
    E viral Essay - Entrepreneurship goes viral: The invention of deviant enterprising selves2015In: M@n@gement, ISSN 1286-4692, E-ISSN 1286-4692, Vol. 18, no 5, p. 359-362Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 21.
    Berglund, Karin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Business School, Management & Organisation.
    Emotions as practices that propel a circulation of entrepreneurship2018Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 22.
    Berglund, Karin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Business School, Management & Organisation.
    Entreprenörskap som kreativt handlingsutrymme2015In: Skolledning: scener från den organiserande vardagen / [ed] Jan Löwstedt, Lund: Studentlitteratur, 2015, p. 95-107Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 23.
    Berglund, Karin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Business School, Management & Organisation.
    Fighting against all odds: Entrepreneurship education as employability training2013In: Ephemera : Theory and Politics in Organization, ISSN 2052-1499, E-ISSN 1473-2866, Vol. 13, no 4, p. 717-735Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper the efforts of transforming ‘regular’ entrepreneurship to a specific kind of ‘entrepreneurial self’ in education are linked to the materialization of employability. It will be illustrated that schoolchildren, under the guise of entrepreneurship education, are taught how to work on improving their selves, emphasizing positive thinking, the joy of creating and awareness of the value of their own interests and passions. This ethic reminds us that we can always improve ourselves, since the enterprising self can never fully be acquired. The flipside of this ethic is that, by continuously being encouraged to become our best, it may be difficult to be satisfied with who we are. Highlighted in this paper is that, with all the amusement and excitement present in entrepreneurship education, also comes an expectation of the individual to fight against all odds. Recruiting students to this kind of shadow-boxing with their selves should involve critical reflection on its political dimensions, human limits, alternative ideals and the collective efforts that are part of entrepreneurial endeavours.

  • 24.
    Berglund, Karin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Business School, Management & Organisation.
    Kärt barn har många namn: Om entreprenörskaps alla (o)möjliga former2013In: Företagsekonomin och samhället / [ed] Hans Hasselbladh, Mikael Holmqvist, Lund: Studentlitteratur, 2013, p. 167-196Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 25.
    Berglund, Karin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Business School, Management & Organisation.
    När det oavsedda utmanar spelreglerna…2006In: Den oavsedda organisationen / [ed] Daniel Ericsson, Lund: Academia adacta, 2006, p. 108-134Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 26.
    Berglund, Karin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Business School, Management & Organisation.
    Social Entrepreneurs: Precious and Precarious2017In: Critical Perspectives on Entrepreneurship: Challenging Dominant Discourses / [ed] Caroline Essers, Pascal Dey, Deirdre Tedmanson, Karen Verduyn, Routledge, 2017Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 27.
    Berglund, Karin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Business School, Management & Organisation.
    Social entrepreneurship: Performative enactments of compassion2018In: Social entrepreneurship: an affirmative critique / [ed] Pascal Dey, Chris Steyaert, Cheltenham: Edward Elgar Publishing, 2018, p. 182-188Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 28.
    Berglund, Karin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Business School, Management & Organisation.
    The queer potential of women entrepreneurs2012Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 29.
    Berglund, Karin
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Business School, Management & Organisation.
    Ahl, Helene
    Pettersson, Katarina
    Tales of Heroine Entrepreneurs2017In: The Routledge Companion to Global Female Entrepreneurship / [ed] Colette Henry, Teresa Nelson, Kate V. Lewis, London: Routledge, 2017Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 30.
    Berglund, Karin
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Business School, Management & Organisation.
    Ahl, Helene
    Pettersson, Katarina
    Tillmar, Malin
    Movi(e)ing practices of gender, rurality and entrepreneurship2018Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 31.
    Berglund, Karin Anna Elisabeth
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Business School, Management & Organisation.
    Wigren-Kristoferson, Caroline
    Using pictures and artefacts in a PAR process to disclose new wor(l)ds of entrepreneurship2012In: Action Research, ISSN 1476-7503, E-ISSN 1741-2617, Vol. 10, no 3, p. 276-292Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Drawing on Freire, this article elaborates on how pictures and artefacts benefit processes of 'prise de conscience' and 'conscientization' among those with powerful voices. Wor(l)d-making was unfolded in the Swedish think-and-do tank, 'the Smithy', emphasizing the intrinsically political nature of promoting 'societal entrepreneurship' (SE). New words for SE were formulated and a more inclusive world was discerned where all had a role, not just as 'helpers', but as equal members of SE practices. Pictures and artefacts enabled hitherto silenced stories to be told and created a common understanding of how SE contrasted with traditional entrepreneurship. When new words were added to entrepreneurship, it was possible to reflect on the actions taken within the Smithy in a deeper sense, not only focusing on actions for the entrepreneurs 'out there', but also initiating self-reflection on the roles all had in the Smithy, or in other settings, to promote SE.

  • 32.
    Berglund, Karin
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Business School, Management & Organisation.
    Annika, Skoglund
    Social entrepreneurship: to defend society from itself2016In: Rethinking entrepreneurship: debating research orientations / [ed] Alain Fayolle, Philippe Riot, Routledge, 2016, p. 57-77Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 33.
    Berglund, Karin
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Business School, Management & Organisation.
    Birkelöf, Frida
    Lundin, Johanna
    Löfgren, Annika
    Engaged Sisters: studying the entrepreneurship and innovation support system from ‘within’2013Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Entrepreneurship and innovation support has grown into large institutions in a society that cherishes an enterprising culture. Individuals are encouraged to be entrepreneurial and innovative in general, and to start up their own companies in particular. To support individuals in their business creation processes, policy stresses the need of providing with measures. Together these measures comprise a support system, directed towards supporting new and established entrepreneurs. It has however been recognized that the entrepreneurship and innovation public support system is highly gendered, favoring men and male businesses, whilst programs targeting women put the onus on individual women to start and grow businesses. As well it has been recognized that the policy support system tends to exclude ‘othered’ groups rather than including them in enterprising activities. The subtext of entrepreneurship support points to how some people “are” entrepreneurs, whilst others need support in order to become more entrepreneurial. Hence, there is a need to change the support system of entrepreneurship and innovation since it tends to disempower rather than to empower ‘othered’ groups in society.

    “Sisters in Business” make up an organization of wo/men entrepreneurs who have joined forces to address this need. Their vision is that entrepreneurship should reflect the society at large. During the last year they have therefore taken several initiatives to make this happen and is today one of the support organizations in a medium sized Swedish town. In this paper three Sisters are working together with a researcher within this area. Together we have formed a group of “engaged sisters´”. In our dialogue the dichotomy between ‘practice’ and ‘theory’ have temporarily dissolved in favor of creating narratives, from episodes, experiences and the everyday life of sister´s, to illustrate how the support system works from ‘within’. This led us to questioning whether the ‘support system’ really is a support system, or something else? Furthermore, this insight made it apparent that there exists ‘other’ support system, tough concealed and silenced. Finally, suggestions are proposed for how ‘practitioners’ can work together with ‘academics’ to change the rules of the game.

  • 34.
    Berglund, Karin
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, School of Business, Management & Organisation.
    Brännback, Malin
    Åbu University.
    Carsrud, Alan
    Understanding The Entrepreneur and Innovator Nexus as a Basis for the Coming of the Science of the Artificial2012Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 35.
    Berglund, Karin
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Business School, Management & Organisation.
    Dahlin, Maria
    Tilling, Katarina
    Johansson, Ulf
    Book review: Making Sense of Intellectual Capital: Designing a Method for the Valuation of Intangibles2005In: The European Accounting Review, ISSN 0963-8180, E-ISSN 1468-4497, Vol. 14, no 3, p. 160-162Article, book review (Refereed)
  • 36.
    Berglund, Karin
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Business School, Management & Organisation.
    Gaddefors, Johan
    SLU.
    Entrepreneurship Requires Resistance to be Mobilized2010In: (De)Mobilizing entrepreneurship : Exploring entrepreneurial thinking and action / [ed] Bill Frederic, Bjerke Björn and Johansson Anders W., Edward Elgar Publishing, 2010, p. 140-157Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 37.
    Berglund, Karin
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Business School, Management & Organisation.
    Granat Thorslund, Jennie
    Innovative policies? Entrepreneurship and innovation policy from a gender perspective2012In: Promoting innovation: Policies, practices and procedures / [ed] Susanne Andersson, Karin Berglund, Ewa Gunnarsson, Elisabeth Sundin, Stockholm: Vinnova , 2012, p. 25-46Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Innovation and entrepreneurship are no longer two words that only assist in describing societal phenomena of “newness”, “change” and “diffusion”; they have also grown into important policy areas for assisting the European Union Member States to estab-lish conditions for creating economic growth, new jobs and social cohesion. Our inter-est lies in understanding the gender dimension of innovation and entrepreneurship policy. Do entrepreneurship and innovation policies consolidate, adapt to, challenge, or even transform the gender system? The gender system is referred to here as a theo-retical concept which recognises how men and women are separated in society, hori-zontally as well as vertically. This chapter provides a discourse analysis of two texts within the framework of the Lisbon Strategy - Innovative Sweden (2004) and the Green Paper of Entrepreneurship (European Commisson, 2003), with the aim of look-ing into how innovation and entrepreneurship policies are gendered.

  • 38.
    Berglund, Karin
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Business School, Management & Organisation.
    Holmgren, Carina
    Entrepreneurship Education in Policy and Practice2013In: International Journal of Entrepreneurial Venturing, ISSN 1742-5360, E-ISSN 1742-5379, Vol. 5, no 1, p. 9-27Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article pays interest to the intersection between policy and practice when implementing entrepreneurship in the educational system. Taking a point of departure in Mahieu’s (2006) call for knowledge of the interplay between different policy levels and Backström-Widjeskog’s (2010) conclusion about tensions occurring when teachers are introduced to the concept, the intention is to develop knowledge about conflicts and tensions at the intersection between policy and practice. From analysing policy documents and narratives from entrepreneurship education implementation projects during a time when entrepreneurship education started to be promoted in Sweden three figures of thought are found (economic/humanistic, biological/social, and individual/collective) which are proposed to be involved in creating tensions and conflicts in the intersection between policy and practice. Theoretically, these figures of thought can be seen as a contribution to understanding processes in which the concept of entrepreneurship education has deliberately been moved, by way of policy, to the educational practice. Reflecting on these thought figures may enhance teachers’ translation processes when starting to work with entrepreneurship education in practice.

  • 39.
    Berglund, Karin
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Business School, Management & Organisation.
    Janne, Tienari
    The Paradox of Alternative Entrepreneurship: Doing, Undoing & Redoing Gender in a Contested Space2014Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 40.
    Berglund, Karin
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Business School, Management & Organisation.
    Jerregård, Helena
    Jag tar ett steg i taget: barns tankar om ingenjören, teknik och arbetsliv2013In: Bilden av ingenjören / [ed] Yvonne Eriksson, Ildikó Asztalos Morell, Stockholm: Carlsson Bokförlag, 2013, p. 266-297Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 41.
    Berglund, Karin
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Business School, Management & Organisation.
    Johannisson, BengtSchwartz, Birgitta
    Societal entrepreneurship: positioning, penetrating, promoting2012Collection (editor) (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Entrepreneurship generally is about creative organizing but with social enterprising this is especially so. Most social ventures cross the boundaries between the private, the public and the non-profit/voluntary sectors. This broad involvement of actors and intertwining of sectors makes the label ‘societal’ entrepreneurship appropriate. Stating the importance of both the local and the broader societal context, the book reports close-up studies from a variety of social ventures. Generic themes include positioning societal entrepreneurship against other images of collective entrepreneurship, critically penetrating its assumptions and practices and proposing ways of promoting societal entrepreneurship more widely. Providing a new conceptual framework and research methodology, this compendium will prove insightful for academic scholars. The basic concepts and illustrative cases/stories will also appeal to students and reflective practitioners.

  • 42.
    Berglund, Karin
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Business School, Management & Organisation.
    Johansson, Anders W.
    Dark and bright effects of a polarized entrepreneurship discourse… and the prospects of transformation2012In: Societal Entrepreneurship: positioning, penetrating, promoting / [ed] Karin Berglund, Bengt Johannisson, Birgitta Schwartz, Edward Elgar Publishing, 2012, p. 163-190Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 43.
    Berglund, Karin
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Business School, Management & Organisation.
    Lindberg, Jessica
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Business School, Management & Organisation.
    Schwartz, Birgitta
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Business School, Management & Organisation.
    Skoglund, Annika
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Business School, Management & Organisation.
    Transformation from entrepreneurship to entrepreneurships: creating alternatives?2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper our ambition is to provide with theoretical and empirical inspiration for studying contemporary constitutions of entrepreneurship. In specific, we seek to highlight how the transformation from entrepreneurship into forms of entrepreneurships has unfolded on various arenas. This means tracing the interplay between criticism of (traditional) entrepreneurship and the outbreak and dissemination of alternative entrepreneurships. In specific, we focus on the positive connotations that come with the alternative forms, a goodness that lures behind each and every corner, to see what it shapes as well as what shape entrepreneurship takes. Even if entrepreneurship research does pay some interest to the changing conditions for entrepreneurship, it seldom links these to changes in conditions for people, organizations and societies.

  • 44.
    Berglund, Karin
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Business School, Management & Organisation.
    Lindgren, Monica
    Packedorff, Johann
    Consumption of entrepreneurs, consumption of entrepreneurship: Bloggers, influencers and socialites in a post-feminist society.2018Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 45.
    Berglund, Karin
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Business School, Management & Organisation.
    Lindgren, Monica
    Packedorff, Johann
    Otherness in discourse, otherness in practice: Gendered notions of entrepreneurship in Swedish school education2012Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 46.
    Berglund, Karin
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Business School, Management & Organisation.
    Pettersson, Katarina
    Will the recognition of women entrepreneurs advance gender equality? Theorising the gendering of the enterprising self2015Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 47.
    Berglund, Karin
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Business School, Management & Organisation.
    Redmalm, David
    Skoglund, Annika
    Sensitizing entrepreneurship: The shaping of a FemInc.ist entrepreneurship of care2016Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 48.
    Berglund, Karin
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Business School, Management & Organisation.
    Schwartz, Birgitta
    Holding on the anomaly of social entrepreneurship: dilemmas in starting up and running a fair-trade enterprise2013In: Journal of Social Entrepreneurship, ISSN 1942-0676, E-ISSN 1942-0684, Vol. 4, no 3, p. 237-255Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The different shapes taken on by social entrepreneurship in contemporary society show that social goals are integrated by commercial enterprises and commercial goals are incorporated by organisations with a social mission. Combining a social mission with commercial goals is often presented as a ‘win-win’ situation. In this article, we highlight the potential tensions and conflicts created by the conflicting demands and expectations when the institutional non-profit and for-profit logics meet in social entrepreneuring. From this viewpoint, social entrepreneurship is an anomaly, which seems difficult to resolve. Despite this, we often read descriptions of social entrepreneurs as heroes, which show how social entrepreneurship is glorified and part of the marketisation of society. This article sets out to present a more complex and problematic picture of practising social entrepreneurship where the obvious ‘win-win’ situations more often appear as ‘win-lose’ and sometimes even as ‘lose-lose’. From a three-year ethnographic study of an emerging fair-trade enterprise, the concept of disharmony shows that dilemmas are part of everyday life in social entrepreneuring. Instead of posing insoluble conflicts, dilemmas light the way for the individual social entrepreneur. They are managed through temporary rationalisation; finding a way to integrate conflicting demands into the life of a social entrepreneur. Disharmony includes moments of identity struggle, but is also a learning process in which the social entrepreneur tries to understand the difference between what she does and what she actually achieves.

  • 49.
    Berglund, Karin
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Business School, Management & Organisation.
    Skoglund, Annika
    Entrepreneurship and the Enterprising Self: Creating alternatives through entrepreneurship education?2015Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 50.
    Berglund, Karin
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Business School, Management & Organisation.
    Tillmar, Malin
    To play or not to play: that is the question: entrepreneuring as gendered play2015In: Scandinavian Journal of Management, ISSN 0956-5221, E-ISSN 1873-3387, Vol. 31, no 2, p. 206-218Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    How can play be used to unravel the discourse of the gendered hero entrepreneur and instead describe mundane entrepreneuring? Further, how can the doing of gendered social orders be problematized when entrepreneuring is equated with play? In this article we answer these questions by engaging with the French social theorist Caillois’ (1961) conceptualization of play as being at the heart of all higher culture. Two ethnographic cases act as our vehicle in analysing play as entrepreneuring. From a rich description of these cases we find that it is not a question of playing or not playing, but about how to play. All four forms of play described by Caillois are present, which illustrates the variation of entrepreneuring and the richness of activities conducted in the ‘doing of entrepreneurship’. Further, both ways of playing discussed by Caillois are found. Whilst these two ways are interrelated on a continuum in the theory of play, they have been separated in entrepreneurship discourse, where they underpin the tendency to differentiate between the hero entrepreneur and ordinary people. Finally, we engage in a more interpretive and reflective discussion on entrepreneuring as performative acts through which social orders can be not only reproduced but also transformed.

12345 1 - 50 of 229
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