Change search
Refine search result
12 1 - 50 of 99
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1. Abubakar, Amin
    et al.
    Dimitrova, Radosveta
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Personality, Social and Developmental Psychology.
    Social connectedness, life satisfaction and school engagement: moderating role of ethnic minority status on resilience processes of Roma youth2016In: European Journal of Developmental Psychology, ISSN 1740-5629, E-ISSN 1740-5610, Vol. 13, no 3, p. 361-376Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We examined the influence of connectedness on school engagement and life satisfaction among Roma (n = 121) and Bulgarian (n = 143) mainstream adolescents (mean age 15.89, SD = 1.18). A set of measures on family, peer, school and neighbourhood connectedness were administered alongside life satisfaction and school engagement scales. Multigroup path analysis indicated that while the relationship between connectedness, life satisfaction and school engagement was largely the same across groups, the strength of such relationship differed among groups. A closer inspection of the model indicated that when it comes to school engagement, there was a salient difference in the role of different forms of connectedness between Roma and mainstream adolescents. For Roma adolescents, familial connectedness was especially salient for school engagement. The practical and theoretical implications of our findings for strengths and adaptive processes among Roma adolescents in Bulgaria are discussed.

  • 2. Abubakar, Amina
    et al.
    Dimitrova, Radosveta
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Personality, Social and Developmental Psychology.
    Tair, Ergyul
    Measurement Invariance of the Brief Multidimensional Student’s Life Satisfaction Scale Among Adolescents and Emerging Adults Across 23 Cultural Contexts2016In: Journal of Psychoeducational Assessment, ISSN 0734-2829, E-ISSN 1557-5144, Vol. 34, no 1, p. 28-38Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There is hardly any cross-cultural research on the measurement invariance of the Brief Multidimensional Students’ Life Satisfaction Scales (BMSLSS). The current article evaluates the measurement invariance of the BMSLSS across cultural contexts. This cross-sectional study sampled 7,739 adolescents and emerging adults in 23 countries. A multi-group confirmatory factor analysis showed a good fit of configural and partial measurement weights invariance models, indicating similar patterns and strengths in factor loading for both adolescents and emerging adults across various countries. We found insufficient evidence for scalar invariance in both the adolescents’ and the emerging adults’ samples. A multi-level confirmatory factor analysis indicated configural invariance of the structure at country and individual level. Internal consistency, evaluated by alpha and omega coefficients per country, yielded acceptable results. The translated BMSLSS across different cultural contexts presents good psychometric characteristics similar to what has been reported in the original scale, though scalar invariance remains problematic. Our results indicate that the BMSLSS forms a brief measure of life satisfaction, which has accrued substantial evidence of construct validity, thus suitable for use in cross-cultural surveys with adolescents and emerging adults, although evaluation of degree of invariance must be carried out to ensure its suitability for mean comparisons.

  • 3. Aydinli-Karakulak, Arzu
    et al.
    Baylar, Ayben
    Cagla Keles, Seray
    Dimitrova, Radosveta
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Personality, Social and Developmental Psychology. Hiroshima University, Japan .
    Positive Affect and School Related Outcomes: Feeling Good Facilitates School Engagement Among Turkish-Bulgarian Minority Adolescents2017In: Well-Being of Youth and Emerging Adults across Cultures: Novel Approaches and Findings from Europe, Asia, Africa and America / [ed] Radosveta Dimitrova, Cham: Springer, 2017, p. 145-156Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Fredrickson's (Rev Gen Psychol 2:300-319, 1998, Am Psychol 56:218-226, 2001) Broaden and Build Theory (BBT) proposes that experiencing positive affect results in broadened thoughts and behaviors, which facilitate adaptive responses to various environmental conditions. The present chapter tests the applicability of this theory for school engagement in an acculturation context and examines whether or to what extent positive affect also facilitates school engagement for 201 Turkish-Bulgarian adolescents (59% male) aged 14-19 years. Results showed that experiencing positive affect was positively related to school engagement among Turkish-Bulgarian youth, and thereby provide support for the applicability of Fredrickson's theory in an acculturation contect. Findings highlight the role of positive affect for school engagement and can be used to facilitate the adaption process of youth by promoting the creation of environment in which the experience of positive affect is fostered.

  • 4. Aydinli-Karakulak, Arzu
    et al.
    Dimitrova, Radosveta
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Personality, Social and Developmental Psychology.
    Brief report: When does identity lead to negative affective experiences?: A comparison of Turkish–Bulgarian and Turkish–German adolescents2016In: Journal of Adolescence, ISSN 0140-1971, E-ISSN 1095-9254, Vol. 47, p. 125-130Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We examine relationships between social identity domains (ethnic, national, and religious) and negative affect among Turkish–Bulgarian and Turkish–German youth. Path analysis confirmed a multiple social identities (MSI) factor that has negative relations to experiencing negative affect for Turkish youth in both countries. Beyond this negative relationship, the component of national identity showed a positive relationship to negative affect for Turkish–Bulgarians, but not for Turkish–Germans. Our findings indicate that beyond the generally adaptive effect of MSI on youth development, unique components of social identity may not always be an asset: In an assimilative acculturation context (i.e., Bulgaria), the endorsement of national identity was not adaptive. Our research therefore highlights the need for a contextually differentiated view on “healthy” identity formation among immigrants for research and practice.

  • 5. Buzea, Carmen
    et al.
    Dimitrova, Radosveta
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Personality, Social and Developmental Psychology.
    Internal versus External Ethnic Identification of Roma: Implications for Social Inclusion in Romania2016In: Social Work Review, ISSN 1583-0608, no 3Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Roma represent the most relevant and sizable ethnic minority across Europe with estimates varying from 10 up to 15 million of people. However, discrepancy in external (ascribed by others) and internal or self-defined ethnic identification of Roma are largely present in Europe and Romania in particular. We set out to explore internal and external ethnic identification of Romanian Roma by investigating Roma communities from 58 Romanian sites (10 cities and 48 villages), based on data collected from local experts (policemen, teachers, social workers, religious leaders). Results showed that: a) external ethnic identification (identification made by others) is three times higher than the official census data and the extreme poverty is the common characteristic of Roma communities; b) according to local experts, main markers to identify Roma refer to geographic proximity, extreme poverty, poor living conditions and enlarged family size. Implications for social inclusion programs at local and European level are discussed along with directions for future research.

  • 6. Buzea, Carmen
    et al.
    Dimitrova, Radosveta
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Personality, Social and Developmental Psychology. Hiroshima University, Japan .
    Positive Affect and the Experience of Meaning in Life Among Romanian Emerging Adults2017In: Well-Being of Youth and Emerging Adults across Cultures: Novel Approaches and Findings from Europe, Asia, Africa and America / [ed] Radosveta Dimitrova, Cham: Springer, 2017, p. 95-103Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Meaning in life has been consistently documented as an essential component for a "good life" and a key to positive functioning (Davis, Wortman, Lehman, & Silver, 2000; Scollon & King, 2004). In this chapter, we examined the relationship between positive affect (PA) and the experience of life meaning among emerging adults in Romania. Results showed that PA was positively and significantly correlated with meaning of life and the most consistent predictor of the overall experience of meaning of life. We conclude that positive moods may predispose emerging adults to feel that life is meaningful. These results provide new knowledge on the construct of meaning in life among under investigated cultural sample in Europe in line with renewed attention on psychological strengths in emerging adulthood.

  • 7. Bäck, Emma A.
    et al.
    Bäck, Hanna
    Gustafsson Sendén, Marie
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Personality, Social and Developmental Psychology.
    Sikström, Sverker
    From I to We: Group Formation and Linguistic Adaption in an Online Xenophobic Forum2018In: The Journal of Social and Political Psychology, E-ISSN 2195-3325, Vol. 6, no 1, p. 76-91Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Much of identity formation processes nowadays takes place online, indicating that intergroup differentiation may be found in online communities. This paper focuses on identity formation processes in an open online xenophobic, anti-immigrant, discussion forum. Open discussion forums provide an excellent opportunity to investigate open interactions that may reveal how identity is formed and how individual users are influenced by other users. Using computational text analysis and Linguistic Inquiry Word Count (LIWC), our results show that new users change from an individual identification to a group identification over time as indicated by a decrease in the use of “I” and increase in the use of “we”. The analyses also show increased use of “they” indicating intergroup differentiation. Moreover, the linguistic style of new users became more similar to that of the overall forum over time. Further, the emotional content decreased over time. The results indicate that new users on a forum create a collective identity with the other users and adapt to them linguistically.

  • 8.
    Cancino-Montecinos, Sebastian
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Personality, Social and Developmental Psychology.
    Björklund, Fredrik
    Lindholm, Torun
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Personality, Social and Developmental Psychology.
    Dissonance and abstraction: Cognitive conflict leads to higher level of construal2018In: European Journal of Social Psychology, ISSN 0046-2772, E-ISSN 1099-0992, Vol. 48, no 1, p. 100-107Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study investigated the effects of cognitive conflict on abstract thinking. According to action-identification theory, an ambiguous and unfamiliar situation might propel an individual to a more abstract mindset. Based on this premise, cognitive conflict was hypothesized to put people in an abstract mindset. The induced compliance paradigm, in which participants are asked to write a counter-attitudinal essay under either low choice (producing little dissonance) or high choice (producing more dissonance), was employed. Results showed that an abstract mindset was in fact activated in the induced compliance paradigm, and this effect was more pronounced for participants having a more concrete mindset to begin with. The results suggest that the experience of cognitive conflict is closely related to increased abstraction.

  • 9.
    Cancino-Montecinos, Sebastian
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Personality, Social and Developmental Psychology.
    Björklund, Fredrik
    Lindholm, Torun
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Personality, Social and Developmental Psychology.
    Dissonance reduction as emotion regulation: Attitude change is related to positive emotions in the induced compliance paradigm2018In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 13, no 12, article id e0209012Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to clarify how positive and negative emotions are related to the common attitude-change effect in cognitive dissonance research. Drawing on appraisal theories of emotion, and emotion-regulation research, we predicted that negative emotions would be inversely related to attitude change, whereas positive emotions would be positively related to attitude change in the induced compliance paradigm. In two studies, participants (N = 44; N = 106) wrote a counter-attitudinal essay under the perception of high choice, and were later asked to state their emotions in relation to writing this essay, as well as to state their attitude. Results confirmed the predictions, even when controlling for baseline emotions. These findings untangled a previously unresolved issue in dissonance research, which in turn shows how important emotion theories are for the understanding of cognitive dissonance processes.

  • 10.
    Cancino-Montecinos, Sebastian
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Personality, Social and Developmental Psychology.
    Borg, Elisabet
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Perception and psychophysics.
    Assessing traits in a psychophysical way: Reassessing need for cognition and behavioral inhibition/approach2018In: Fechner Day 2018: Proceedings of the 34th Annual Meeting of the International Society for Psychophysics / [ed] Friedrich Müller, Lara Ludwigs, Malizia Kupper, International Society for Psychophysics , 2018, p. 36-42Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to investigate if different scale formats affect what conclusion one can draw about the prevalence of a specific trait in a sample. More specifically, we compared the original scale format of Need for cognition (1-5) and Behavioral Inhibition/Approach (1-4) with an 11-point scale (0-10), and a psychophysical scale originally developed to measure physical exertion, Borg centiMax Scale®. Forty-eight psychology undergraduate students participated in return for course credit. In a within-subjects design, all participants completed both questionnaires in all three versions. Results revealed that the mean was consistently reaching ceiling effects when using the original scale formats, and the variation was relatively low compared to the other scales. In sum, the results revealed that the scale format plays a significant role in how prevalent a specific trait becomes in a sample.

  • 11.
    Cancino-Montecinos, Sebastian
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Personality, Social and Developmental Psychology.
    Lindholm, Torun
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Personality, Social and Developmental Psychology.
    Dissonance and abstraction: Cognitive conflict leads to higher level of construal2017Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This study investigated the effects of cognitive conflict on abstraction. Results revealed that an abstract mindset was in fact activated when participants experienced cognitive conflict. This suggest that cognitive conflicts are closely related to increased abstraction.

  • 12.
    Cancino-Montecinos, Sebastian
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Personality, Social and Developmental Psychology.
    Lindholm, Torun
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Björklund, Fredrik
    Cognitive dissonance leads to an abstract mindset2016In: Book of abstract, 2016, p. 38-38Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This study investigated the effects of cognitive dissonance on abstract thinking. According to action-identification theory, whenever people try to understand a situation in a new way, they activate an abstract mindset. Based on this premise, dissonance was hypothesized to put people in an abstract mindset. The induced compliance paradigm, in which participants are asked to write a counter-attitudinal essay under either low choice (producing little dissonance) or high choice (producing more dissonance), was employed. Results showed that dissonance did in fact activate a more abstract mindset, and this effect was more pronounced for participants having a more concrete mindset to begin with. This suggests that increasing abstraction, as a reaction to cognitive conflict, is a way for people to resolve inconsistencies.

  • 13.
    Cancino-Montecinos, Sebastian
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Personality, Social and Developmental Psychology.
    Lindholm, Torun
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Personality, Social and Developmental Psychology.
    Björklund, Fredrik
    The effects of cognitive dissonance on abstract thinking: Dissonance leads to an abstract mindset2016Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In this study, we investigated how individuals’ abstract thinking increases when experiencing dissonance. Dissonance theory holds that people reduce dissonance by accommodating their attitudes in order to fit their most recent behavior. This process resembles the reasoning of action-identification theory (AIT), which postulates that people usually try to understand their actions in a meaningful and coherent way, and also that actions can take on new meanings when people move from a low-level to a high-level understanding of the action. Thus, acting inconsistently threatens the coherent understanding of ones action; and in order to regain a sense of consonance, people will try to find a new meaning of their action (e.g., via attitude change). However, this occurs when moving to a high-level understanding (i.e., thinking more abstractly) of ones action. However, the effect of dissonance on abstraction should be stronger for individuals with low level of abstraction to begin with – since AIT holds that people who naturally tend to think abstractly already have high-level understandings of their actions. We predicted that: (1) dissonance puts people in a more abstract mindset, and (2) this effect will be more apparent for individuals low in abstraction. First, we established participants’ natural tendencies to abstract thinking with the Gestalt Completion Test (GCT). This variable was later split into low and high GCT. Several days later, we employed the induced compliance paradigm, in which participants were asked to write a counter-attitudinal essay under either low choice or high choice. High-choice participants usually experience more dissonance. We also created a neutral condition (to serve as a comparison to the other conditions) in which individuals were asked to write a pro-attitudinal essay. After the induced compliance manipulation, the Behavior Identification Form (BIF) was used to measure abstraction. The sample consisted of 125 non-psychology students. A 3 (condition: high-choice vs. low-choice vs. neutral) ˙ 2 (GCT: low vs. high) between subjects factorial ANOVA showed that participants in the high-choice condition (who experienced more dissonance) did exhibit a more abstract mindset, and level of GCT moderated this effect. The following simple effects analysis showed a significant effect for the low-GCT groups: (F(2, 119) = 6.607, p = .002, &#951;2 = .100) and the pairwise comparisons revealed that high-choice participants exhibited a significantly more abstract mindset (M = 16.65, SD = 4.54) compared to both the low-choice participants (M = 13.18, SD = 4.45) p = .013, d = .77 and the neutral participants (M = 12.25, SD = 4.71) p < .001, d = .95. No significant effects were found when comparing the high-GCT groups (p = .398). The present study demonstrated that dissonance activates abstract thinking, which is thought to facilitate people’s understanding their recent actions. This finding has important implication for the future study of consequences of cognitive conflicts, and also the study of how abstraction enables people to find new meanings of their own actions. Hence, investigation on these mechanisms could shed more light on how people regulate their thoughts, emotions and behavior in real time.

  • 14.
    Cederborg, Ann-Christin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Personality, Social and Developmental Psychology.
    Young children's play: a matter of advanced strategies among peers2018In: Early Child Development and Care, ISSN 0300-4430, E-ISSN 1476-8275Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study explores how 3–5 year-old children negotiate participation rights during peer play in a preschool in Sweden. The interest is on how they build relations moment-by-moment. I specifically analyze how they negotiate participation rights with a focus on how they include and exclude each other in the ongoing activity. This is an ethnographic study, and the method is inspired by conversation analysis where the verbal and non-verbal interaction is studied sequentially. The findings are that even very young children are capable of advanced social acts when playing together. Such capacities may include face-threatening acts but also solidarity towards one or more participants. It is important that face-threatening strategies are recognized and addressed as soon as possible because children can need help to find alternative ways to behave when in conflict with one another. Otherwise there is a risk that such strategies, when repeated, cause harm to those children exposed.

  • 15. Chen, Bin-Bin
    et al.
    Wiium, Nora
    Dimitrova, Radosveta
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Personality, Social and Developmental Psychology.
    Factor structure of positive youth development: Contributions of exploratory structural equation modeling2018In: Personality and Individual Differences, ISSN 0191-8869, E-ISSN 1873-3549, Vol. 124, p. 12-15Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The five Cs model of positive youth development describes adolescents' development as reflecting five distinct but related domains of Competence, Confidence, Character, Connection, and Caring. This research used confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) and exploratory structural equation modeling (ESEM) to test the five Cs model in a Chinese sample of 384 adolescents (49.6% males; mean of age = 15.13 years old). The results showed that ESEM had better fit and relatively smaller factor correlations than CFA. In addition, factors such as Connection and Caring were well defined by their target indicators, although several non-target indicators significantly loaded onto Confidence factor in ESEM analysis. These results suggest that the correlations between some factors might be greatly overestimated in previous research based on CFA. The implication that ESEM is a more appropriate approach for testing the factor structure of the five Cs model of PYD is discussed.

  • 16.
    Clausén Gull, Ingela
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Personality, Social and Developmental Psychology.
    The relation between Executive Functions and Emotion Regulation in Preschool Children2016Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Executive Functions (EF) and Emotion Regulation (ER) are essential for children´s ability to regulate and control thoughts, behavior and emotions but the developmental relations between them are unclear. The present study was performed within the project PsPATHS with the purpose to investigate the relation between EF and ER. Performance on cognitive tasks tapping inhibitory control, working memory and cognitive flexibility were combined with teacher report of ER in 55 four to five year old preschool children. Contrary to the hypothesis, no significant relations could be established between EF and ER in this sample. For the EF components, the result showed a significant association between inhibitory control and cognitive flexibility, however, no further associations could be evidenced. The study demonstrates an advantage in using multiple measures and suggests that attention along with motivational and affective aspects of EF should be considered in future research of children´s ability to regulate emotions.

  • 17.
    Cortes, Diana S.
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Biological psychology.
    Skragge, Michael
    Döllinger, Lillian
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Clinical psychology.
    Laukka, Petri
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Cognitive psychology.
    Fischer, Håkan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Biological psychology.
    Nilsson, Mats E.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Perception and psychophysics.
    Hovey, Daniel
    Westberg, Lars
    Larsson, Marcus
    Granqvist, Pehr
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Personality, Social and Developmental Psychology.
    Mixed support for a causal link between single dose intranasal oxytocin and spiritual experiences: opposing effects depending on individual proclivities for absorption2018In: Social Cognitive & Affective Neuroscience, ISSN 1749-5016, E-ISSN 1749-5024, Vol. 13, no 9, p. 921-932Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Intranasal oxytocin (OT) has previously been found to increase spirituality, an effect moderated by OT-related genotypes. This pre-registered study sought to conceptually replicate and extend those findings. Using a single dose of intranasal OT vs placebo (PL), we investigated experimental treatment effects, and moderation by OT-related genotypes on spirituality, mystical experiences, and the sensed presence of a sentient being. A more exploratory aim was to test for interactions between treatment and the personality disposition absorption on these spirituality-related outcomes. A priming plus sensory deprivation procedure that has facilitated spiritual experiences in previous studies was used. The sample (N = 116) contained both sexes and was drawn from a relatively secular context. Results failed to conceptually replicate both the main effects of treatment and the treatment by genotype interactions on spirituality. Similarly, there were no such effects on mystical experiences or sensed presence. However, the data suggested an interaction between treatment and absorption. Relative to PL, OT seemed to enhance spiritual experiences in participants scoring low in absorption and dampen spirituality in participants scoring high in absorption.

  • 18.
    Dimitrova, Radosveta
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Personality, Social and Developmental Psychology.
    Capacity Building2018In: The SAGE Encyclopedia of Lifespan Human Development / [ed] Marc H. Bornstein, Thousand Oaks: Sage Publications, 2018, p. 303-305Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This entry describes historical development and definitions of capacity building. Capacity building refers to a wide array of activities that strengthen the ability of people and organizations to formulate solutions to problems and achieve objectives. The term gained considerable attention in the early 1970s and emerged as a leading concept in international policy in the late 1990s. This entry also provides various conceptualizations and applications of capacity building in a variety of contexts through all phases of the human life course. The concluding section addresses the benefits of successful capacity building for the society. Capacity building is a relevant topic for lifespan human development because of the emphasis on development of human resources in all phases of the life course.

  • 19.
    Dimitrova, Radosveta
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Personality, Social and Developmental Psychology.
    Cohesion, similarity and value in parent-child representations of Albanian and Serbian immigrant and Italian native children2016In: Psychology. Journal of the Higher School of Economics, ISSN 1813-8918, Vol. 13, no 1, p. 192-213Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The study of parent-child representations across cultures is important in order to obtain a proper understanding of the attributes, size and positioning of such figures as indicators of different interaction patterns across cultures. A thorough base of research evidence for the interpretation of children’s drawings may facilitate work in multicultural educational settings and enhance our understanding of cultural diversity in schools. Italy provides an ideal context for the study of parent-child representations, as the country has witnessed increasing cultural diversity in recent years with the immigration of various ethnic groups. This study examined the extent to which this context influences children’s representations in domains of Cohesion (interpersonal bonding), Similarity (affinity) and Value (spatial relevance) among parent-child figures because these domains inform important representational processes of interpersonal bonding with parents across specific cultures. The Pictorial Assessment of Interpersonal Relationships (PAIR) was used to codify drawings of 326 children with Albanian (n = 59), Serbian (n = 85) and Italian (n = 182) backgrounds. The results showed that in drawings made by Albanian and Serbian children parental figures were drawn similar to and close to the child figure representing their less independent reciprocal stance. The parental figures drawn by Italian children appear bigger and farther apart. Important implications may be derived from the results in facilitating work in multicultural educational settings, by enhancing knowledge regarding cultural diversity in schools.

  • 20.
    Dimitrova, Radosveta
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Personality, Social and Developmental Psychology.
    Ingredients of good PhD supervision: evidence from a student survey at Stockholm University2016In: Utbildning och Lärande / Education and Learning, ISSN 2001-4554, Vol. 10, no 1, p. 40-53Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [sv]

    Doktorandhandledning är en relevant fråga för en pedagogisk forskarutbildning vid univer-sitet vilket har betydande implikationer inom rad sammanhang, såväl inom industrin som för  grupper  av  arbetsgivare,  studentföreningar  och  akademiker.  Denna  studie  undersöker  centrala aspekter av handledning utifrån doktoranders perspektiv vid Stockholms universi-tet baserat på en undersökning med 761 forskarstuderande. En konfirmatorisk faktoranalys genomförd med strukturell ekvationsmodellering visade sig ge stöd åt en endimensionell modell för handledning som exemplifieras av givandet av konstruktiv kritik till studenter, handledarens tillgänglighet, tillräckligt med tid för handledning, möjlighet till självständigt arbete  och  en  kreativ  miljö  för  forskarutbildningen.  Handledningsindikatorerna  var  även  signifikant och positivt korrelerade. Att studera dessa indikatorer spelar stor roll för riktlinjer inom  utbildning  och  metoder  för  undervisning  i  avsikt  att  kunna  förbättra  forskarutbild-ningen. Studenter skulle kunna bli tydligt informerade om viktiga faktorer att överväga när de väljer samt påbörjar sina studier. Universitetsledning och handledare kan upprätthållas i sin roll att säkerställa en fullgod doktorandupplevelse för deras studenter.

  • 21.
    Dimitrova, Radosveta
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Personality, Social and Developmental Psychology.
    Parenting Stress and Depressive Symptoms of Immigrant and Nonimmigrant Families in Italy2018In: Parental Roles and Relationships in Immigrant Families: An International Approach / [ed] Susan S. Chuang, Catherine L. Costigan, Springer, 2018, p. 169-187Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This chapter examines the influence of parenting stress on depressive symptoms of immigrant parent–child dyads in Italy, which has turned from a traditional country of emigration to that of immigration, where immigrants represent the fastest growing population segment (Hernandez et al., Child Indicators Research 3:13–37, 2010). Participants were 390 children aged 7–13 years old and their parents with immigrant Albanian, Russian, Serbian, Slovene, and mainstream Italian background. Both children and parents completed a depression scale and parents also provided data on their levels of parenting stress. Results showed that immigrant parents report significant levels of depression and parenting stress, and those levels are differently associated to their children’s depressive outcomes. A path model showed that parenting stress was related to depression in both parents and that only parenting stress of fathers was related to depression of their children.

  • 22.
    Dimitrova, Radosveta
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Personality, Social and Developmental Psychology.
    Well-Being of Youth and Emerging Adults across Cultures: Novel Approaches and Findings from Europe, Asia, Africa and America2017Collection (editor) (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The current volume presents new empirical data on well-being of youth and emerging adults from a global international perspective. Its outstanding features are the focus on vast geographical regions (e.g., Europe, Asia, Africa, North and South America), and on strengths and resources for optimal well-being. The international and multidisciplinary contributions address the complexities of young people’s life in a variety of cultural settings to explore how key developmental processes such as identity, religiosity and optimism, social networks, and social interaction in families and society at large promote optimal and successful adaptation. The volume draws on core theoretical models of human development to highlight the applicability of these frameworks to culturally diverse youth and emerging adults as well as universalities and cultural specifics in optimal outcomes. With its innovative and cutting-edge approaches to cultural, theoretical and methodological issues, the book offers up-to-date evidence and insights for researchers, practitioners and policy makers in the fields of cross-cultural psychology, developmental science, human development, sociology, and social work.

  • 23.
    Dimitrova, Radosveta
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Personality, Social and Developmental Psychology. Hiroshima University, Japan.
    Aydinli-Karakulak, Arzu
    Acculturation orientations mediate the link between religious identity and adjustment of Turkish-Bulgarian and Turkish-German adolescents2016In: SpringerPlus, E-ISSN 2193-1801, Vol. 5, article id 1024Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There is a growing recognition of the need to examine religiousness and conduct research on its influence on acculturation and adjustment among ethnic minorities (Güngör et al. in Int J Behav Dev 36:367–373, 2012. doi:10.1177/0165025412448357). The present study compares Turkish minority youth in Bulgaria and Germany by examining relationships among religious identity, acculturation orientations (i.e., cultural maintenance and adoption) and acculturation outcomes (i.e., life satisfaction and socio-cultural adjustment to the Turkish and mainstream cultures). Participants were 161 youth in Bulgaria and 155 in Germany who completed measures on religious identity, acculturation orientations and adjustment. Results revealed that religious identity and Turkish culture maintenance are more important for Turkish-German, than for Turkish-Bulgarian youth. A multigroup path model showed that for both samples acculturation orientations partially mediated the link between religious identity and adjustment to the Turkish culture, whereas religious identity was directly related both to adjustment to the mainstream culture and to life satisfaction. Findings highlight the centrality of religious identity and Turkish domains of acculturation for positive adjustment outcomes for Turkish youth in Bulgaria and Germany.

  • 24.
    Dimitrova, Radosveta
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Personality, Social and Developmental Psychology. Hiroshima University, Japan.
    Bayram Özdemir, Sevgi
    Farcas, Diana
    Kosic, Marianna
    Mastrotheodoros, Stefanos
    Michalek, Justyna
    Stefenel, Delia
    Is There a Paradox of Adaptation in Immigrant Children and Youth Across Europe? A Literature Review2017In: Well-Being of Youth and Emerging Adults across Cultures: Novel Approaches and Findings from Europe, Asia, Africa and America / [ed] Radosveta Dimitrova, Cham: Springer, 2017, p. 261-298Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This review examines how well children of immigrants in Europe are doing in terms of educational, psychological, and behavioral outcomes. Based on theory and research in developmental, social and acculturation psychology fields, we explore the immigrant paradox (e.g., first-generation immigrant children show better adaptation in comparison to their native and second-generation counterparts) and migration morbidity (e.g., immigrants display less favorable outcomes than natives) in 102 studies conducted in 14 European countris. We conclude that theoretical assumptions of developmental (e.g., promoting context in families, schools, neighborhoods), social (e.g., intercultural behaviors and attitudes, lack of discrimination) and acculturation psychology (e.g., cultural maintenance and adoption, biculturalism) are powerful constituents for optimal adaptation of immigrant children and youth. Taken together, these constituents should guide policies and programs targeting optimal outcomes for children of immigrants. A discussion within empirically based policy practices to promote positive outcomes of young immigrant populations in Europe is offered.

  • 25.
    Dimitrova, Radosveta
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Personality, Social and Developmental Psychology.
    Buzea, Carmen
    Tausova, Jitka
    Uka, Fitim
    Zakaj, Skerdi
    Crocetti, Elisabetta
    Relationships between identity domains and life satisfaction in minority and majority youth in Albania, Bulgaria, Czech Republic, Kosovo, and Romania2018In: European Journal of Developmental Psychology, ISSN 1740-5629, E-ISSN 1740-5610, Vol. 15, no 1, p. 61-82Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this study was to examine relationships between identity domains (educational and relational identity) and life satisfaction in a cross-national perspective, by targeting minority (Roma) and majority youth in Albania, Bulgaria, Czech Republic, Kosovo, and Romania. Based on the three-factor identity formation model, we investigated the interplay between three identity processes (i.e., commitment, in-depth exploration, and reconsideration of commitment) and life satisfaction. Participants were 1860 adolescents aged 12–19 years from Albania (n = 350), Bulgaria (n = 398), the Czech Republic (n = 293), Kosovo (n = 542), and Romania (n = 277). They completed self-reports of the Utrecht-Management of Identity Commitments Scale (U-MICS) and the Life Satisfaction Scale (SWLS). We adopted a structural equation modelling approach to test (a) measurement invariance of identity and life satisfaction models across groups and (b) associations between identity domains (educational and relational) and life satisfaction. Findings indicated measurement invariance for identity and life satisfaction measures across cultural groups. In the total sample, life satisfaction was consistently associated with high commitment, high in-depth exploration, and low reconsideration of commitment in the educational identity domain. Sample-specific associations highlighted important cultural differences. Implications of these findings for identity and well-being in minority and mainstream youth across the countries under investigation are discussed.

  • 26.
    Dimitrova, Radosveta
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Personality, Social and Developmental Psychology. Hiroshima University, Japan.
    Chasiotis, Athanasios
    Bender, Michael
    van de Vijver, Fons J. R.
    Identity and well-being of ethnic minority and mainstream adolescents in Bulgaria2017In: Current Issues in Personality Psychology, ISSN 2353-4192, Vol. 5, no 1, p. 41-52Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    We study identity in the context of long-term sedentary groups in Eastern Europe in contrast to the frequently studied short-term immigrants in typical Western European or US American contexts. This paper provides a novel approach to youth identity in an Eastern European post-communist context for minority groups that are quite distinct from the mainstream group to advance the study of identity. Turkish-Bulgarians and Muslim-Bulgarians have been subjected to extensive assimilation campaigns, which prompted them to carefully negotiate their ethnic identity and sense of belonging.

    Participants and procedure

    Participants were 366 adolescents aged 16 to 18 years (M = 16.72, SD = 0.71) from South Central and South Western regions of Bulgaria. This sample included Turkish-Bulgarian (n = 145), Muslim-Bulgarian (n = 85), and (mainstream) Bulgarian (n = 136) youth who provided data on personal, ethnic, familial, and religious identity as well as psychological well-being.

    Results

    Turkish-Bulgarian youth scored higher on achievement, diffusion, and foreclosure but lower on moratorium and Bulgarian ethnic and familial identity than Muslim-Bulgarian and Bulgarian youth. Bulgarian mainstreamers scored significantly lower on religious identity compared to their Turkish-Bulgarian and Muslim-Bulgarian peers. Finally, Bulgarian mainstream identity significantly predicted well-being of youth from all groups, independent of their ethnic background.

    Conclusions

    A strong ethnic and familial identity results in beneficial psychological outcomes for youth, even in the face of adversity and assimilation.

  • 27.
    Dimitrova, Radosveta
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Personality, Social and Developmental Psychology. Hiroshima University, Japan.
    Chasiotis, Athanasios
    Bender, Michael
    van de Vijver, Fons J.R.
    Collective Identity Resources for Positive Well-Being Among Turkish-Bulgarian and Muslim-Bulgarian Minority Adolescents in Bulgaria2017In: Well-Being of Youth and Emerging Adults across Cultures: Novel Approaches and Findings from Europe, Asia, Africa and America / [ed] Radosveta Dimitrova, Cham: Springer, 2017, p. 191-207Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This chapter advances research in understudied minority groups in Eastern Europe by providing empirical evidence on a novel approach that examines collective identity assets for optimal well-being of youth. We apply collective identity perspective conceptualized in terms of strong relationships among ethnic, familial, and religious group memberships in comparing adolescents from two stigmatized ethnic minority groups and their mainstream Bulgarian peers. Turkish-Bulgarians and Muslim-Bulgarians historically experienced continuous assimilation attempts and severe discrimination, effectively limiting their religious and ethnic minority rights (Vassilev R, Glob Rev Ethnopolitics 3:40-51, 2004). This chapter furthers our understanding of multiple identity resources as core component of well-being of ethnic minority youth with Turkish-Bulgarian and Muslim-Bulgarian background. These results further extend findings on identity and well-being conducted in Western European and American settings to the unique and scarcely researched context of long-term acculturating ethnic minority groups in Eastern Europe.

  • 28.
    Dimitrova, Radosveta
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Personality, Social and Developmental Psychology.
    Chasiotis, Athanasios
    van de Vijver, Fons
    Adjustment Outcomes of Immigrant Children and Youth in Europe: A Meta-Analysis2016In: European Psychologist, ISSN 1016-9040, E-ISSN 1878-531X, Vol. 21, no 2, p. 150-162Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Compared to natives, immigrants have been reported to display either more (migration morbidity) or fewer (immigrant paradox) adjustment problems. We examined these two perspectives using a meta-analysis from 51 studies (N = 224,197), reporting internalizing, externalizing, and academic outcomes among immigrant children and youth in Europe. Overall, migration morbidity was better supported than the immigrant paradox. Migration morbidity was supported for (a) externalizing outcomes in Northern Europe and adolescent samples; (b) academic outcomes for low SES and fewer girls across samples; (c) internalizing outcomes in Western Europe and preadolescent samples. Cultural diversity and long-term residence of immigrants are favorable factors for the paradox in externalizing outcomes, whereas immigrant family reunion was predictive for the paradox in internalizing and academic outcomes. Implications for future research and policy are discussed.

  • 29.
    Dimitrova, Radosveta
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Personality, Social and Developmental Psychology.
    Crocetti, Elisabetta
    Buzea, Carmen
    Jordanov, Venzislav
    Kosic, Marianna
    Tair, Ergyul
    Tausova, Jitka
    van Cittert, Natasja
    Uka, Fitim
    The Utrecht-Management of Identity Commitments Scale (U-MICS) Measurement Invariance and Cross-National Comparisons of Youth From Seven European Countries2016In: European Journal of Psychological Assessment, ISSN 1015-5759, E-ISSN 2151-2426, Vol. 32, no 2, p. 119-127Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Utrecht-Management of Identity Commitments Scale (U-MICS; Crocetti, Rubini, & Meeus, 2008) is a recently developed measure of identity that has been shown to be a reliable tool for assessing identity processes in adolescents. This study examines psychometric properties of the U-MICS in a large adolescent sample from seven European countries focused on the interplay of commitment, in-depth exploration, and reconsideration of commitment. Participants were 1,007 adolescents from Bulgaria (n = 146), the Czech Republic (n = 142), Italy (n = 144), Kosovo (n = 150), Romania (n = 142), Slovenia (n = 156), and the Netherlands (n = 127). We tested the U-MICS measurement invariance, reliability estimates in each language version, and compared latent identity means across groups. Results showed that the U-MICS has good internal consistency as well as configural, metric, and partial scalar invariance across groups in the sampled countries.

  • 30.
    Dimitrova, Radosveta
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Personality, Social and Developmental Psychology. Hiroshima University, Japan.
    del Carmen Dominguez Espinosa, Alejandra
    Relationships Between Religiousness and Life Satisfaction Among Emerging Adults in Mexico and Nicaragua2017In: Well-Being of Youth and Emerging Adults across Cultures: Novel Approaches and Findings from Europe, Asia, Africa and America / [ed] Radosveta Dimitrova, Cham: Springer, 2017, p. 225-234Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study examines relationships between religiousness and life satisfaction among 571 emerging adults (M age 29.94, SD = 2.93) from Mexico and Nicaragua. Based on the four-factor religiousness model (Saroglou V, J Cross-Cultural Psychol 42:1320-1340, 2011), we investigated the interplay of believing (beliefs relative to external transcendence), bonding (rituals and emotions), behaving (adherence to norms) and belonging (social group cohesion) and their relation to life satisfaction. Participants completed the Four Basic Dimensions of Religiousness Scale (4-BDRS; Saraglou V, J Cross-Cultural Psychol 42:1320-1340, 2011) and the Life Satisfaction Scale (SWLS; Diener E, Emmerson RA, Larsen RJ, Griffin S, J Pers Assess 49:71-75), 1985). We tested measurement invariance and associations of religiousness and life satisfaction models across groups. Findings indicated good measurement invariance for both measures and that life satisfaction was consistently associated with high endorsement of all four religiousness domains.

  • 31.
    Dimitrova, Radosveta
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Personality, Social and Developmental Psychology.
    del Carmen Domínguez Espinosa, Alejandra
    Factorial structure and measurement invariance of the Four Basic Dimensions of Religiousness Scale among Mexican males and females2017In: Psychology of Religion and Spirituality, ISSN 1941-1022, E-ISSN 1943-1562, Vol. 9, no 2, p. 231-238Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Four Basic Dimensions of Religiousness Scale (4-BDRS) is a newly developed instrument based on 4 components of religion: believing (beliefs relative to external transcendence), bonding (rituals and emotions), behaving (adherence to norms and moral arguments), and belonging (community and social group cohesion; Saroglou, 2011). This paper provides empirical evidence to support the factorial structure and measurement invariance assumptions of 4-BDRS among 1,982 adults (mean age of 29.27 years) from Mexico, a country among the top 10 nations in the world for religious involvement. The fit indices indicate similar patterns and strengths in factor loadings, means, and intercepts across males and females. Gender comparisons showed that females score significantly higher on all 4 religiousness dimensions than males. We conclude that the 4-BDRS is a brief and valid measure of religiousness that is suitable for use in Mexican samples.

  • 32.
    Dimitrova, Radosveta
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Personality, Social and Developmental Psychology.
    Ferrer-Wreder, Laura
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Personality, Social and Developmental Psychology.
    Positive Youth Development of Roma Ethnic Minority Across Europe2017In: Handbook on Positive Development of Minority Children and Youth / [ed] Natasha J. Cabrera, Birgit Leyendecker, Springer, 2017, p. 307-320Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Roma are one of Europe’s largest and most vulnerable ethnic minority groups, currently making up nearly 12 million people, and have historically experienced severe marginalization and discrimination. Roma children and youth in particular are globally recognized to be in need of support and their successful adaptation and optimal outcomes are of major interest to practitioners and policy makers. This chapter addresses resources within proximal contexts, such as peers and family contexts that have the potential to foster positive youth development in Roma ethnic minority populations in Europe. Roma are mainly a sedentary indigenous ethnic minority group characterized by strong family, community and peer bonds, thereby creating a unique and underrepresented context to study PYD. In this chapter, we provide a brief historical overview, current research and empirical findings on Roma children and youth within peer and family contexts. We draw on core theoretical models of PYD as well as selected developmental theories of normative development to highlight the applicability of these traditional frameworks to Roma ethnic minority groups. In so doing, we pay careful attention to the cultural, ethnic, and economic characteristics of Roma youth and their family context. In the conclusion, we explored the implications of the reviewed evidence to the development of resource-oriented policy and practice for Roma youth.

  • 33.
    Dimitrova, Radosveta
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Personality, Social and Developmental Psychology.
    Ferrer-Wreder, Laura
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Personality, Social and Developmental Psychology.
    Galanti, Maria Rosaria
    Pedagogical and Social Climate in School Questionnaire: Factorial Validity and Reliability of the Teacher Version2016In: Journal of Psychoeducational Assessment, ISSN 0734-2829, E-ISSN 1557-5144, Vol. 34, no 3, p. 282-288Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study evaluated the factorial structure of the Pedagogical and Social Climate in School (PESOC) questionnaire among 307 teachers in Bulgaria. The teacher edition of PESOC consists of 11 scales (i.e., Expectations for Students, Unity Among Teachers, Approach to Students, Basic Assumptions About Students’ Ability to Learn, School–Home Relations, Teacher Cooperation, Teachers’ Professional Development, Teaching Activities, Student Valuation, Principal’s Pedagogical Leadership, and School Management). A confirmatory factor analysis conducted with structural equation modeling supported a bi-dimensional factor model (Students and Teachers; School Leadership and Management). School climate indicators were also significantly and positively correlated. PESOC is an asset to the literature on assessment of school climate with evidence for factorial validity and reliability in an underresearched international context.

  • 34.
    Dimitrova, Radosveta
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Personality, Social and Developmental Psychology.
    Ferrer-Wreder, Laura
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Personality, Social and Developmental Psychology.
    Åhlén, Johan
    School Climate, Academic Achievement and Educational Aspirations in Roma Minority and Bulgarian Majority Adolescents2018In: Child and Youth Care Forum, ISSN 1053-1890, E-ISSN 1573-3319, Vol. 47, no 5, p. 645-658Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: School climate can promote students’ academic achievement and high educational aspirations. School climate refers to the quality and character of school life, norms, values, social interactions and organizational processes within a school.

    Objective: We examined for the present sample whether (a) school climate relates to academic achievement and educational aspirations and (b) such relations vary for Roma minority compared to their majority peers.

    Method: Participants in this cross-sectional study were 356 adolescents aged 11–19 years old (159 Roma, 197 Bulgarian majority), 332 mothers (149 Roma, 183 majority), 231 fathers (104 Roma, 127 majority) and 221 majority teachers who completed self-report surveys to address the study goals. Adolescents provided data on educational aspirations and academic achievement, parents on their children’s educational aspirations and teachers reported on school climate. We employed linear mixed models to explore associations of school climate, academic achievement and educational aspirations among Roma and Bulgarian majority youth.

    Results: There were negative associations between teacher-reported school climate and students’ academic achievement, as well as adolescent and parental educational aspirations for Roma adolescents only. Roma adolescents and parents reported lower academic achievement and educational aspirations than their majority counterparts.

    Conclusions: This study supports the relevance of school climate in relation to academic achievement and aspirations of disadvantaged minority students. Interventions should pay close attention to perceptions and attitudes in a school to successfully promote positive outcomes among students.

  • 35.
    Dimitrova, Radosveta
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Personality, Social and Developmental Psychology.
    Hatano, Kai
    Sugimura, Kazumi
    Ferrer-Wreder, Laura
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Personality, Social and Developmental Psychology.
    The Erikson Psychosocial Stage Inventory in Adolescent Samples: Factorial Validity and Equivalence of Identity as Measured From the United States and Japan2018In: European Journal of Psychological Assessment, ISSN 1015-5759, E-ISSN 2151-2426Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study tested the factorial structure and equivalence of identity as measured by the Erikson Psychosocial Stage Inventory (EPSI; Rosenthal, Gurney, & Moore, 1981) in 2,666 adolescents (Mage = 16.53, SD = 1.50, 55% girls) in the United States and Japan. The EPSI Identity Scale is a widely used measure of the Eriksonian conceptualization of personal identity (i.e., individual self-knowledge, synthesis, and consistency) and is measured with two factors: identity confusion and synthesis. A bi-factor model for the EPSI had a better fit than a single- and two-factor model. Moreover, the EPSI results showed configural and partial metric equivalence, but did not show scalar equivalence across samples. Future cross-national research with adolescents from the United States and Japan may investigate correlates between identity, as measured by the EPSI, with other measures of interest. However, group comparisons among these samples may be ill advised due to a lack of scalar equivalence.

  • 36.
    Dimitrova, Radosveta
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Personality, Social and Developmental Psychology.
    Johnson, Deborah J.
    van de Vijver, Fons J. R.
    Ethnic socialization, ethnic identity, life satisfaction and school achievement of Roma ethnic minority youth2018In: Journal of Adolescence, ISSN 0140-1971, E-ISSN 1095-9254, Vol. 62, p. 175-183Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Explaining Positive Adaptation of Immigrant Youth across Cultures.

    This study tested a mediation model of ethnic socialization (i.e., parental practices that promote children's knowledge about their history, heritage culture, cultural authenticity, and ethnic bias management) in Roma youth. Roma are the largest ethnic minority group in Europe subjected to severe discrimination, both currently and historically. Participants were 202 Roma youth aged 14 to 19 years old (M = 16.25, 53% females), who provided self-reports on their experience of ethnic socialization, ethnic identity, school achievement, and life satisfaction. Cultural pride reinforcement was related to better school achievement, whereas cultural coping with antagonism was positively related to life satisfaction. The study confirmed the model in that ethnic socialization was positively related to life satisfaction through effects on ethnic identity but negatively associated with school achievement. Findings have implications for adaptive cultural mechanisms promoting positive developmental outcomes among historically disadvantaged groups including those intersecting immigrant and multigenerational ethnic minority group categories.

  • 37.
    Dimitrova, Radosveta
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Personality, Social and Developmental Psychology.
    Musso, Pasquale
    Naude, Luzelle
    Zahaj, Skerdi
    Solcova, Iva Polackova
    Stefenel, Delia
    Uka, Fitim
    Jordanov, Venzislav
    Jordanov, Evgeni
    Tavel, Peter
    National collective identity in transitional societies: Salience and relations to life satisfaction for youth in South Africa, Albania, Bulgaria, the Czech Republic, Kosovo and Romania2017In: Journal of Psychology in Africa, ISSN 1433-0237, E-ISSN 1815-5626, Vol. 27, no 2, p. 150-158Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this study we investigated the salience of the construct of national collective identity and its associations with life satisfaction among adolescents living in transitional societies characterised by relevant change in the last decades. Participants were 1 066 adolescents (M = 15.35 years, SD = 1.35) from South Africa (n = 186) and five Central Eastern European countries, including Albania (n = 209), Bulgaria (n = 146), Czech Republic (n = 306), Kosovo (n = 116), and Romania (n = 103). They completed a questionnaire including national identity and life satisfaction scales. Data were analysed using confirmatory factor analysis and multi-group structural equation modeling. Results showed that national identity of adolescents in transitional societies is multidimensional and pertains to different salient dimensions (i.e., self-categorisation, evaluation, importance, attachment, and behavioural involvement). Importantly, the findings provided evidence to suggest that higher levels of national collective identity are associated with increased levels of life satisfaction.

  • 38.
    Dimitrova, Radosveta
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Personality, Social and Developmental Psychology.
    Musso, Pasquale
    Polackova Solcova, Iva
    Stefenel, Delia
    Uka, Fitim
    Zahaj, Skerdi
    Tavel, Peter
    Jordanov, Venzislav
    Jordanov, Evgeni
    Multiple Social Identities in Relation to Self-Esteem of Adolescents in Post-communist Albania, Bulgaria, the Czech Republic, Kosovo, and Romania2018In: Changing Values and Identities in the Post-Communist World / [ed] Nadezhda Lebedeva, Radosveta Dimitrova, John Berry, Springer, 2018, p. 225-241Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    We test a model linking ethnic, familial, and religious identity to self-esteem among youth in Albania, Bulgaria, the Czech Republic, Kosovo, and Romania. All countries are post-communist nations in Europe, offering novel and underexplored settings to study identity. Participants were 880 adolescents (mean age, 15.93 years; SD, 1.40) with Albanian (n = 209), Bulgarian (n = 146), Czech (n = 306), Kosovan (n = 116), and Romanian (n = 103) background who filled in an Ethnic Identity Scale (Dimitrova et al., 2016), familial and religious identity scales adapted from the Utrecht Management of Identity Commitment Scales [U-MICS; Crocetti et al. Child and Youth Care Forum, 40, 7–23 (2011); Crocetti et al. Assessment, 1, 2–16 (2015)], and the Rosenberg’s Self-Esteem Scale [Rosenberg, Conceiving the self. Basic Books, New York (1979)]. A multigroup path model showed that ethnic, familial, and religious identities were significantly positively related to a single underlying construct of social identities. In all countries, youth with a stronger multiple identities reported higher self-esteem. These results are particularly valuable in addressing the scope of the proposed book by providing new knowledge on multiple social identities among under investigated samples from post-communist countries in Europe faced with dynamic societal changes. They also mirror increasing attention on multiple, inclusive, and intersectional identities as psychological assets for young generations.

  • 39.
    Dimitrova, Radosveta
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Personality, Social and Developmental Psychology. University of Bergen, Norway.
    Musso, Pasquale
    Polackova Solcova, Iva
    Stefenel, Delia
    Uka, Fitim
    Zahaj, Skerdi
    Tavel, Peter
    Jordanov, Venzislav
    Jordanov, Evgeni
    Understanding Factors Affecting Well-Being of Marginalized Populations in Different Cultural Contexts: Ethnic and National Identity of Roma Minority Youth in Europe2018In: Developmental Science and Sustainable Development Goals for Children and Youth / [ed] Suman Verma, Anne C. Petersen, Springer, 2018, p. 169-185Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This chapter focuses on the intersection of the third, fourth and tenth Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), referring together to key pillars for improving social inclusion of vulnerable disadvantaged youth. Based on both Positive Youth Development approach and mutual intercultural relations perspective, it sets out to investigate developmental assets (such as ethnic and national identities), optimal outcomes (self-esteem), and their relations among Roma youth in six European countries (Albania, Bulgaria, the Czech Republic, Italy, Kosovo, and Romania). Among these countries, the Czech Republic was initially recognized as the more favorable context facilitating potential alignment of Roma young people’s ecology with their identity resources, and therefore, promoting well-being. Results supported that in the Czech Republic youth experienced more stable integration of both Roma ethnic and national identities in terms of similar mean levels as well as positive associations of both identities with self-esteem. Results for the other countries were quite fragmented depending on the specific contextual conditions. The findings are discussed in light of the SDGs, the theoretical frameworks, research contexts and limitations, and implications.

  • 40.
    Dimitrova, Radosveta
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Personality, Social and Developmental Psychology.
    van de Vijver, Fons J. R.
    Tausova, Jitka
    Chasiotis, Athanasios
    Bender, Michael
    Buzea, Carmen
    Uka, Fitim
    Tair, Ergyul
    Ethnic, Familial, and Religious Identity of Roma Adolescents in Bulgaria, Czech Republic, Kosovo, and Romania in Relation to Their Level of Well-Being2017In: Child Development, ISSN 0009-3920, E-ISSN 1467-8624, Vol. 88, no 3, p. 693-709Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study examines ethnic, national, familial, and religious identity and well-being of 632 Roma minority and 589 majority adolescents (age: M = 15.98 years, SD = 1.34) in Bulgaria, the Czech Republic, Kosovo, and Romania. Results indicated that Roma showed lower endorsement of national identity but stronger religious identity than their majority counterparts. Path models showed positive associations of familial and religious identities with well-being, whereas Roma identity was negatively associated with well-being, particularly for Roma in Bulgaria and Kosovo (countries with a less active policy toward improving conditions of Roma). In the latter countries, Roma ethnic identity is less relevant and weakly associated with psychological well-being of youth.

  • 41.
    Eneroth, Mari
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Work and organizational psychology.
    Gustafsson Sendén, Marie
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Personality, Social and Developmental Psychology.
    Gustafsson, Karin Schenck
    Wall, Maja
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Work and organizational psychology.
    Fridner, Ann
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Work and organizational psychology. Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Threats or violence from patients was associated with turnover intention among foreign-born GPs - a comparison of four workplace factors associated with attitudes of wanting to quit one's job as a GP2017In: Scandinavian Journal of Primary Health Care, ISSN 0281-3432, E-ISSN 1502-7724, Vol. 35, no 2, p. 208-213Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: General practitioners (GPs) are crucial in medical healthcare, but there is currently a shortage of GPs in Sweden and elsewhere. Recruitment of GPs from abroad is essential, but foreign-born physicians face difficulties at work that may be related to turnover intention, i.e. wanting to quit one's job. The study aims to explore the reasons to why foreign-born GPs may intend to quit their job. Design: Survey data were used to compare four work-related factors that can be associated with turnover intentions; patient-related stress, threats or violence from patients, control of work pace, and empowering leadership, among native-born and foreign-born GPs. These work-related factors were subsequently examined in relation to turnover intention among the foreign-born GPs by means of linear hierarchical regression analyses. The questionnaire consisted of items from the QPS Nordic and items constructed by the authors. Setting: A primary care setting in a central area of Sweden. Subjects: Native-born (n = 208) and foreign-born GPs (n = 73). Results: Turnover intention was more common among foreign-born GPs (19.2% compared with 14.9%), as was the experience of threats or violence from patients (22% compared with 3% of the native-born GPs). Threats or violence was also associated with increased turnover intention. Control of work pace and an empowering leadership was associated with reduced turnover intention.

  • 42.
    Eninger, Lilianne
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Personality, Social and Developmental Psychology.
    Ferrer-Wreder, Laura
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Personality, Social and Developmental Psychology.
    Eichas, Kyle
    Allodi Westling, Mara
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Special Education.
    Smedler, Ann-Charlotte
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Clinical psychology.
    Olsson, Tina
    Sedem, Mina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Special Education.
    Ginnner Hau, Hanna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Special Education.
    Herkner, Birgitta
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Special Education.
    Domitrovic, Celene
    Culture and Young Children’s Social Emotional Competence: Findings and Implications for the Cultural Adaptation of Interventions2017Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 43.
    Eriksson, Kimmo
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Centre for the Study of Cultural Evolution. Mälardalen University, Sweden.
    Strimling, Pontus
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Centre for the Study of Cultural Evolution. Linköping University, Sweden; Institute for Futures Studies, Sweden.
    Andersson, Per A.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Centre for the Study of Cultural Evolution. Linköping University, Sweden.
    Lindholm, Torun
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Personality, Social and Developmental Psychology.
    Costly punishment in the ultimatum game evokes moral concern, in particular when framed as payoff reduction2017In: Journal of Experimental Social Psychology, ISSN 0022-1031, E-ISSN 1096-0465, Vol. 69, p. 59-64Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The ultimatum game is a common economic experiment in which some participants reject another's unfair offer of how to split some money, even though it leaves them both worse off. This costly behavior can be seen as enforcement of a fairness norm and has been labeled “altruistic punishment”, suggesting that it is a moral thing to do. But is this behavior viewed as moral by participants? Is it viewed as punishment? And are the payoff consequences of the behavior sufficient to determine the answers to these questions? To investigate this we framed costly punishment in two different ways: either as rejection of an offer (the standard ultimatum game framing) or as reduction of payoff. In a series of paid and hypothetical experiments we found that moral concerns about costly punishment depended on the framing. Specifically, the reduction frame elicited more moral concern about, and less use of, costly punishment than did the rejection frame. Several implications are discussed.

  • 44.
    Ferrer-Wreder, Laura
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Personality, Social and Developmental Psychology.
    Reflections: Teaching Abroad2016In: International Psychology Bulletin, Vol. 20, no 1, p. 32-32Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 45.
    Ferrer-Wreder, Laura
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Personality, Social and Developmental Psychology.
    Eichas, Kyle
    Lorente, C.
    Dimitrova, Radosveta
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Personality, Social and Developmental Psychology.
    Galanti, M.R.
    Exploring identity synthesis, gender, and adjustment in the KUPOL Study: Initial findings2017Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 46.
    Ferrer-Wreder, Laura
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Personality, Social and Developmental Psychology.
    Eichas, Kyle
    Trost, Kari
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Child and Youth Studies.
    Galanti, Maria Rosaria
    Ways to Measure Family-Related Factors in Swedish Families using Child and Parent Reports2018Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Many Swedish parents report that they tend to employ moderate control as well as frequent use of democratic parenting practices (Trost, 2012). This approach to parenting combined with policy and institutional supports for child and family welfare make the Swedish parenting context in some ways unique and in need of further investigation (e.g., Trost, El-Khouri, & Sundell, 2015). From a measurement perspective, when parents and children in the same family report on the same construct, one is faced with several questions such as are the child and parent reports reflective of the same construct? If yes, then child and parent reports can be modelled or conceptualized as indicators of the same construct. Another possibility is that adolescents’ and parents’ perceptions of a given construct are fundamentally different from one another. A number of options exist in terms of how to conceptualize measurement when parents and children report on the same construct (Bank, Dishion, Skinner, & Patterson, 1990).

    The results presented in this poster are from a longitudinal study of school climate and mental health (study name and citation blinded for peer review). The sample consists of a cohort of Swedish 7th graders (N=3,932, aged 13-14 years old, 51.8% =female, from 101 schools in eight Swedish regions). At grade 7, using structural equation modelling (SEM), different measurement models of family-related factors were tested, namely democratic parenting (Wray-Lake & Flanagan, 2012), parental warmth (Trost, et al, 2007; Tilton-Weaver et al., 2010), and child-parent communication (Kerr & Statin, 2000). Adolescents in the cohort and one of their parents reported on these constructs at grades 7, 8, and 9. The results presented here are for grade 7. Analyses were conducted with Mplus 7.4 (using Mplus’s robust maximum likelihood estimator, TYPE = COMPLEX in Mplus, to account for the nested nature of responses by school building, and FIML estimation for missing data). Three SEM models were tested, including (1) a three-factor model in which parallel child and parent reports were indicators of the same family factors, (2) a six-factor model in which parallel child and parent reports were indicators of separate family factors, and (3) a multi-trait multi-method model with three family factors and two method factors (parent and child report; Model 3). Two models showed good fit to the data: the six-factor model, χ2(89) = 164.873; CFI = .997; RMSEA = .015 [.011, .018], and the multi-trait multi-method model, χ2(84) = 533.735; CFI = .982. RMSEA = .037 [.034, .040]. While both models evidenced good fit, the six-factor model provided the more parsimonious solution. This result indicates that adolescents and parents in this sample may be viewing the family-related factors in different ways. In the poster, other analyses will be reported on the utility of the models identified in grade 7 at the other study time points, such as at grades 8 and 9. Study findings will also be discussed in terms of culture and parenting.

  • 47. Forslund, Tommie
    et al.
    Brocki, Karin C.
    Bohlin, Gunilla
    Granqvist, Pehr
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Personality, Social and Developmental Psychology.
    Eninger, Lilianne
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Personality, Social and Developmental Psychology.
    The heterogeneity of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder symptoms and conduct problems: Cognitive inhibition, emotion regulation, emotionality, and disorganized attachment2016In: British Journal of Developmental Psychology, ISSN 0261-510X, E-ISSN 2044-835X, Vol. 34, no 3, p. 371-387Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study examined the contributions of several important domains of functioning to attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) symptoms and conduct problems. Specifically, we investigated whether cognitive inhibition, emotion regulation, emotionality, and disorganized attachment made independent and specific contributions to these externalizing behaviour problems from a multiple pathways perspective. The study included laboratory measures of cognitive inhibition and disorganized attachment in 184 typically developing children (M age = 6 years, 10 months, SD = 1.7). Parental ratings provided measures of emotion regulation, emotionality, and externalizing behaviour problems. Results revealed that cognitive inhibition, regulation of positive emotion, and positive emotionality were independently and specifically related to ADHD symptoms. Disorganized attachment and negative emotionality formed independent and specific relations to conduct problems. Our findings support the multiple pathways perspective on ADHD, with poor regulation of positive emotion and high positive emotionality making distinct contributions to ADHD symptoms. More specifically, our results support the proposal of a temperamentally based pathway to ADHD symptoms. The findings also indicate that disorganized attachment and negative emotionality constitute pathways specific to conduct problems rather than to ADHD symptoms.

  • 48. Forslund, Tommie
    et al.
    Granqvist, Pehr
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Personality, Social and Developmental Psychology.
    Psychodynamic Foundations2016In: Encyclopedia of Evolutionary Psychological Science / [ed] Viviana Weekes-Shackelford, Todd K. Shackelford, Springer, 2016, p. 1-5Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Westen (1998) has defined psychodynamic theories with five postulates: (1) much of mental life is unconscious; (2) mental processes operate in parallel so that people can have conflicting feelings that motivate them in opposing ways; (3) stable personality patterns begin to form in childhood, and childhood experiences play an important role in the developing personality, particularly in shaping social relationships; (4) mental representations of the self, others, and relationships guide people’s interactions with others and influence psychological symptomatology; and (5) personality development involves learning to regulate sexual and aggressive feelings but also the move from an immature, socially dependent state to a mature, interdependent one. According to this definition, attachment theory is a psychodynamic theory. However, Bowlby explicitly demarcated his attachment theory from the drive principles.

  • 49. Forslund, Tommie
    et al.
    Kenward, Ben
    Granqvist, Pehr
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Personality, Social and Developmental Psychology.
    Gredeback, Gustaf
    Brocki, Karin C.
    Diminished ability to identify facial emotional expressions in children with disorganized attachment representations2017In: Developmental Science, ISSN 1363-755X, E-ISSN 1467-7687, Vol. 20, no 6, article id e12465Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The development of children's ability to identify facial emotional expressions has long been suggested to be experience dependent, with parental caregiving as an important influencing factor. This study attempts to further this knowledge by examining disorganization of the attachment system as a potential psychological mechanism behind aberrant caregiving experiences and deviations in the ability to identify facial emotional expressions. Typically developing children (N=105, 49.5% boys) aged 6-7years (M=6years 8months, SD=1.8months) completed an attachment representation task and an emotion identification task, and parents rated children's negative emotionality. The results showed a generally diminished ability in disorganized children to identify facial emotional expressions, but no response biases. Disorganized attachment was also related to higher levels of negative emotionality, but discrimination of emotional expressions did not moderate or mediate this relation. Our novel findings relate disorganized attachment to deviations in emotion identification, and therefore suggest that disorganization of the attachment system may constitute a psychological mechanism linking aberrant caregiving experiences to deviations in children's ability to identify facial emotional expressions. Our findings further suggest that deviations in emotion identification in disorganized children, in the absence of maltreatment, may manifest in a generally diminished ability to identify emotional expressions, rather than in specific response biases.

  • 50. Fransson, Mari
    et al.
    Granqvist, Pehr
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Personality, Social and Developmental Psychology.
    Marciszko, Carin
    Hagekull, Berit
    Bohlin, Gunilla
    Is middle childhood attachment related to social functioning in young adulthood?2016In: Scandinavian Journal of Psychology, ISSN 0036-5564, E-ISSN 1467-9450, Vol. 57, no 2, p. 108-116Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of the present study (N = 69) was to examine whether middle childhood attachment, measured using the Separation Anxiety Test (Slough, Goyette & Greenberg, 1988), predicts aspects of social functioning (social initiative, prosocial orientation, social anxiety, loneliness) in young adulthood. Insecurity-avoidance at age 8.5 years was, as expected, negatively related to social initiative and prosocial orientation, and was also positively related to social anxiety and loneliness at age 21 years. In addition, insecurity-avoidance contributed to developmental change in social anxiety from middle childhood to young adulthood. Contrary to our expectations, the two security scales were generally unrelated to future social functioning. Taken together, these results extend previous research by showing that insecurity-avoidance is related to social functioning also beyond childhood and adolescence, and that it contributes to developmental change in social functioning over time. The scarcity of prospective links for the attachment security scales points to the need for future studies addressing when and why attachment does not contribute to future social functioning.

12 1 - 50 of 99
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf