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  • 1.
    Arnberg, Klara
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History and International Relations.
    Beyond Mrs consumer: competing femininities in Swedish advertising trade publications, 1900–19392018In: Scandinavian Economic History Review, ISSN 0358-5522, E-ISSN 1750-2837, Vol. 66, no 2, p. 153-169Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article follows the discussion on female consumers in Swedish advertising journals and handbooks. The aim is to problematise the gendered aspects of Swedish consumer and early advertising history, by studying how the notion of the female consumer intersected with notions of social class, marital status and sexuality. The article also closes in on the persons who were invited to embody the consuming women and what kind of interests they represented. The article concludes that, from the start of the twentieth century, gender and class was prevalent in the advertising literature. The married woman was also from the start seen as the head of the consuming family. Therefore, reaching her through advertising became key for facilitating the relations between producer and consumer. With time, different women's organisations, the weekly press, and new theories of advertising from the US addressing the notion of 'Mrs Consumer' came to influence the Swedish advertising trade press. The result became the favouring of a certain kind of middle class, urban and rational kind of femininity, strongly connected to homemaking and women's roles in purchasing for the family. However, this femininity also paralleled notions of 'the flapper' and the professional woman.

  • 2.
    Arnberg, Klara
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History and International Relations.
    Husz, Orsi
    From the great department store with love: Window display and the transfer of commercial knowledge in early twentieth-century Sweden2018In: History of Retailing and Consumption, ISSN 2373-518X, E-ISSN 2373-5171, Vol. 4, no 2, p. 126-155Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article highlights the transfers and practical uses of thecommercial knowledge of window dressing in early twentieth-century Sweden through the analysis of the professional careerand family business of Oscar Lundkvist, Swedish display pioneerand former window dresser in chief of the largest and firstSwedish department store,Nordiska Kompaniet. Building on richsource material including unique written and photographicdocuments from the Lundkvist family, educational material andtrade journals, we show how the innovative and spectacularbecame ordinary and mundane in retail praxis. We argue that theemergence and professionalization of window display broughtwith it the dissemination and trivialization of the same practice.By focusing on not only the most conspicuous aspects andcultural meanings of window displays but also on the materialsand competences involved, we explain how setting up thedisplays became an everyday commercial practice and how it waspositioned between advertising and retail as well as between theartistic and the commercial.

  • 3.
    Bengtsson, Louise
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History and International Relations.
    Borg, Stefan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History and International Relations.
    Rhinard, Mark
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History and International Relations.
    European security and early warning systems: from risks to threats in the European Union’s health security sector2018In: European Security, ISSN 0966-2839, E-ISSN 1746-1545, Vol. 27, no 1, p. 20-40Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article critically examines a poorly understood aspect of the European security landscape: early warning systems (EWSs). EWSs are socio-technical systems designed to detect, analyse, and disseminate knowledge on potential security issues in a wide variety of sectors. We first present an empirical overview of more than 80 EWS in the European Union. We then draw on debates in Critical Security Studies to help us make sense of the role of such systems, tapping into conceptual debates on the construction of security issues as either "threat" or "risk" related. Finally, we study one EWS - the Early Warning and Response System for infectious diseases - to understand how it works and how it reconciles risk versus threat-based security logics. Contrary to assumptions of a clear distinction between risk-and threat-based logics of security, we show that EWSs may serve as a "transmission belt" for the movement of issues from risk into threats.

  • 4.
    Berg, Annika
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Culture and Aesthetics.
    Ericsson, Martin
    Sundevall, Fia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History and International Relations.
    Rösträtt för alla? Begränsningar i rösträtten efter 19212018In: Rösträttens århundrade: kampen, utvecklingen och framtiden för demokratin i Sverige / [ed] Ulrika Holgersson, Lena Wängnerud, Stockholm: Makadam Förlag, 2018, p. 219-239Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 5. Brattberg, Erik
    et al.
    Rhinard, Mark
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History and International Relations. Swedish Institute of International Affairs, Sweden.
    Multilevel Governance and Complex Threats: The Case of Pandemic Preparedness in the European Union and the United States2011In: Global Health Governance, ISSN 1939-2389, E-ISSN 1939-2389, Vol. 5, no 1, p. 1-21Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The scale of dangers posed by influenza pandemics, combined with a series of actual outbreaks, has led policymakers in both the European Union (EU) and the United States (US) to frame the issue as a security threat and to call for extraordinary action. In the US, the 2006 and 2010 National Security Strategies identified pandemics as a “catastrophic challenge” while the 2006 US Pandemic Plan argued that “pandemics should be viewed as a national security issue.” The EU’s 2008 review of its own European Security Strategy broadened the scope of threats facing the continent to include pandemic influenza. Identifying an influenza pandemic as a security threat, however, is relatively easily done. More challenging is to act upon that designation, through implementing security strategies in practice and managing governance processes in multi-level governance systems. Drawing upon securitization theory and traditional implementation theory, this article compares the extent to which the EU and the US have turned words into action on pandemic preparation. The findings show that increasingly securitized rhetoric following the H5N1 and H1N1 outbreaks has indeed been followed by new policies, structures, and operational capacities. As such, the article provides preliminary evidence that securitizing a public policy problem can increase political leverage over administrative processes of implementation.

  • 6.
    Edvinsson, Rodney
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History and International Relations.
    Hegelund, Erik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History and International Relations.
    The Business Cycle in Historical Perspective: Reconstructing Quarterly Data on Swedish GDP, 1913-20142018In: Journal of European Economic History, ISSN 0391-5115, E-ISSN 2499-8281, no 1, p. 33-60Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We present an estimation of quarterly GDP for Sweden stretchingback to 1913, using higher frequency series on manufacturing andprivate consumption as indicators and standard methods for tem-poral disaggregation from annual GDP data. Deseasonalization isperformed using JDemetra+ software. We use the Bry-Boschan al-gorithm to identify peaks and troughs, based on which we presentvarious chronologies of the business cycle in Sweden, indicating apartially new picture of the country’s economic growth over the last100 years.

  • 7.
    Edvinsson, Rodney
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History and International Relations.
    Jacobson, TorWaldenström, Daniel
    Sveriges Riksbank and the History of Central Banking2018Collection (editor) (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Written in celebration of its 350th anniversary in 2018, this book details the history of the central bank of Sweden, Sveriges Riksbank, as presented by Klas Fregert. It relates the bank's history to the development of other major central banks around the world. Chapters are written by some of the more prominent scholars in the field of monetary economics and economic history. These chapters include an analysis of the Bank of England written by Charles Goodhart; the evolution of banking in America, written by Barry Eichengreen; a first account of the People's Bank of China, written by Franklin Allen, Xian Gu, and Jun Qian; as well as a chapter about the brief but important history of the European Central Bank, written by Otmar Issing.

  • 8.
    Fleischer, Rasmus
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History and International Relations.
    Vad betyder det att musik är ”live”?2018In: Musikens makt / [ed] Jenny Björkman, Arne Jarrick, Göteborg: Makadam Förlag, 2018, p. 217-232Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 9.
    Fleischer, Rasmus
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History and International Relations.
    Kullenberg, Christopher
    The Political Significance of Spotify in Sweden – Analysing the #backaspotify Campaign using Twitter Data2018In: Culture Unbound. Journal of Current Cultural Research, ISSN 2000-1525, E-ISSN 2000-1525Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article discusses the political significance of the streaming music company Spotify in Sweden, taking as a case a coordinated campaign in late spring 2016, known by the hashtag #backaspotify (translated as “support Spotify!”), which was mainly played out on the social media platform Twitter. The campaign is analysed using a set of data retrieved from Twitter, examining both the content and the interactions in 1,791 messages. Results show that the main political issue concerned the lack of access to rented apartments in central Stockholm, and that the main actors in the campaign were predominantly associated with public affairs consultants and the youth wings of political parties belonging to the centre-right. The campaign, however, was very short-lived and had diminished significantly already after two days. We conclude that Spotify transcends its role as a streaming music company, and additionally can be used as a point of reference in political campaigns to promote issues that are of wider scope than the music industry alone.

  • 10.
    Franzén, Bo
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History and International Relations.
    Söderberg, Johan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History and International Relations.
    Hus, gårdar och gatubodar: Fastighetspriser i Stockholm och Arboga 1300–16002018In: Historisk Tidskrift (S), ISSN 0345-469X, Vol. 138, no 2, p. 227-254Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Houses, yards and sheds: Real property prices in Stockholm and Arboga, 1300-1600

    The article explores real property prices in Swedish trading towns 1297-1600 based on c. 2900 transactions in Stockholm and the smaller town of Arboga. A consumer price index has been used to deflate nominal prices into real values. The analysis shows that houses made of both stone and wood became cheaper over time. In Isoo prices, the median price of a stone house in Stockholm was 343 Swedish marks in the period 1297-1449 compared to 184 marks in the period 1550-1600. For wooden houses the same downward trend was evident: a drop from 84 marks in the first period to 52 marks in the second period. Part of the price decline is due to the fact that building plots became smaller, which suggests an increase in population in Stockholm. Declining real wages of labourers also exerted a downward pressure on the cost of building a house. The slightly negative long-term trend in real property prices in Stockholm and Arboga, amounting to -0.3 and -0.1 percent per year, respectively, diverges from the strong decline in land prices in Eastern Sweden. This is an indication that the towns were less affected by the late medieval crisis than rural areas were. Plague outbreaks are shown to have affected real property prices in Stockholm, where prices fell during plague years, but quickly recovered afterwards. This pattern can be taken as an indication that real property prices were market prices that reacted to external shocks. The analysis also reports tentative results of real property prices as an indicator of economic inequality. The Gini coefficient for Stockholm varied between 0.55 in the period 1297-1449 to o.58 in the period 1450-1499. This is about the same level of inequality that has been calculated for Amsterdam in the mid-sixteenth century. The Gini coefficient for Arboga was also very similar to that of the Dutch towns taken as a whole. There is no clear trend in inequality over time in either Stockholm or Arboga. Finally, the article discusses trends in female ownership of real property by investigating if the position of women in the real property market deteriorated during the period of study. Female sellers of property amounted to nearly zo percent in Stockholm and Arboga, with no discernable time trend. Female property buyers were fewer, amounting to between three and six percent out of the total before 1500 and a somewhat higher percentage share in the sixteenth century.

  • 11.
    Jakobsson, Elin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History and International Relations.
    Norm Acceptance in the International Community: A study of disaster risk reduction and climate-induced migration2018Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Different kinds of normative claims and statements of “oughtness” infuse the international political environment. But why do some proposed norms become accepted by the international community while others do not? This thesis investigates this central question using two normatively charged international issues as vehicles for explanation.

    One issue reflects the norm to reduce disaster risk. The other issue concerns the normative question of asylum rights for climate-induced migrants. While climate-induced migration attracted much attention in the years 2007-2008, the norm acceptance process was stymied and stalled before it had a chance to gain broad acceptance in the international community. Disaster Risk Reduction reached a different outcome. After norm entrepreneurs had a difficult time in gaining traction for the issue, the 2004 Indian Ocean earthquake and tsunami had an immense impact on the norm’s development, which led to the international community agreeing to the Sendai Framework for Disaster Risk Reduction in 2015. The norm proposition to reduce disaster risk has thus reached a broad and high level of acceptance. This thesis uses a norm theoretical lens to understand these contrasting outcomes. In doing so, it shows that there are key components missing from conventional explanations of norm success and failure. Most importantly, the lack of attention to contingencies and to windows of opportunity that contingencies may open up.

    An analytical framework is developed to account for contingent factors in norm evolution, and the relevance of these components is evaluated by using the two cases in question as plausibility probes. The framework takes the key variables from traditional approaches (agency, the norm itself and framing), adds two more recent suggestions (venue and resistance) and, most importantly, adds the component of contingencies (including windows of opportunity). The detailed empirical investigations draw on a rich, and in some parts unique, material of official texts, practitioner interviews and secondary literature. This thesis thus contributes to existing research on norms and provides future researchers with an enhanced tool for explaining norm emergence.

    The case study on disaster risk reduction provided an example of how a natural catastrophe which coincided with an already planned and prepared international summit on the subject interacted to propel disaster risk reduction to the top of the political agenda and toward norm acceptance. The case concerning international protection for climate-induced migrants showed how three particular moments in time had promising potential to advance the norm toward greater acceptance but largely failed because there were no solutions to act on, because no viable window opened to drive further attention and acceptance or because there was a “negative window”. The analysis conducted according to the framework shows how events must be actively connected to a specific norm proposition and how they must be aligned with other factors that determine the success of a norm, defined in this study as norm acceptance.

    Against this background, this study argues that contingencies, and a theorization of windows of opportunity, should always be included in explanatory tools on norm acceptance. Important explanatory aspects might otherwise be missed.

  • 12. Nugent, Neill
    et al.
    Rhinard, Mark
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History and International Relations. Swedish Institute of International Affairs, Sweden.
    Is the European Commission Really in Decline?2016In: Journal of Common Market Studies, ISSN 0021-9886, E-ISSN 1468-5965, Vol. 54, no 5, p. 1199-1215Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the academic debate on the relative powers and influence of the EU institutions, it has become common to suggest - especially in the case of advocates of the 'new intergovernmentalism' - that the European Commission is in decline. In this article we show that while in some limited respects this is indeed the case, the Commission's overall position in the EU system is not one of having become a weaker institutional actor. The extent of the losses of its powers and influence tends to be exaggerated, while in some aspects its powers and influence have actually been strengthened. We show this by focusing on three of the Commission's core functions-agenda-setter, legislative actor and executive-all of which are widely portrayed as being in decline. We incorporate into our analysis both the formal and informal resources available to the Commission in exercising the functions.

  • 13.
    Rhinard, Mark
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History and International Relations. Swedish Institute of International Affairs, Sweden.
    Resilience: a false promise for the EU’s Global Strategy2017In: After the EU Global Strategy: building resilience / [ed] Florence Gaub, Nico Popescu, Paris: European Union Institute for Security Studies , 2017, p. 25-28Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 14.
    Sundevall, Fia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History and International Relations.
    Money, Gender and Military Training: Women as Economic Agents in Military Affairs (Sweden 1924–1942)2018In: Militärhistorisk Tidskrift, ISSN 0283-8400, p. 60-89Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 15.
    Svanberg, Johan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History and International Relations.
    Mellan facklig internationalism och nationalism: Internationella Metallarbetarfederationen i kalla krigets och Europaintegrationens gryning2018In: Historisk Tidskrift (S), ISSN 0345-469X, Vol. 138, no 3, p. 421-451Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 16. Söderqvist, Jonas
    et al.
    Sundevall, Fia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History and International Relations.
    Att tillgängliggöra forskning?2018In: Arbetarhistoria : Meddelande från Arbetarrörelsens Arkiv och Bibliotek, ISSN 0281-7446, no 165-166 (2018:1-2), p. 4-5Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 17.
    Viktorov, Ilja
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History and International Relations.
    Insider trading (USA/general)2018In: The Global Encyclopaedia of Informality, Volume 2: Understanding Social and Cultural Complexity / [ed] Alena Ledeneva, London: UCL Press, 2018, p. 233-236Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The entry provides a brief introduction into insider trading as an informal practice in stock markets, with emphasis on the US historical experience. Examples from Russia and Nigeria as emerging markets are also provided.

1 - 17 of 17
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