Change search
Refine search result
1 - 6 of 6
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1. Bankins, Sarah
    et al.
    Griep, Yannick
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Stress Research Institute. Radboud University, The Netherlands; Pontificia Universidad Javeriana, Colombia .
    Hansen, Samantha D.
    Charting directions for a new research era: addressing gaps and advancing scholarship in the study of psychological contracts2020In: European Journal of Work and Organizational Psychology, ISSN 1359-432X, E-ISSN 1464-0643, Vol. 29, no 2, p. 159-163Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The nature of work and the contexts in which firms operate have changed significantly in the many decades since the study of psychological contracts (PCs) at work began in earnest. These changes have altered the contours of the traditional employer-employee relationship and are key motivators of this Special Issue. We seek to chart new directions for PC research over the next decade by widening the theoretical and methodological lenses used to explore PC processes. In the introductory editorial we briefly outline the PC construct, overview the collected papers, and discuss the next exciting wave of PC research (exploring PC dynamics, PC counterparties, and the PC context) inspired by this collection.

  • 2. Cedstrand, Emma
    et al.
    Nyberg, Anna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Stress Research Institute. Karolinska Institutet, Sweden.
    Bodin, Theo
    Augustsson, Hanna
    Johansson, Gun
    Study protocol of a co-created primary organizational-level intervention with the aim to improve organizational and social working conditions and decrease stress within the construction industry - a controlled trial2020In: BMC Public Health, ISSN 1471-2458, E-ISSN 1471-2458, Vol. 20, no 1, article id 424Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Within construction industry, physical work exposures have long been recognized as possible determinants for musculoskeletal disorders, but less attention has been given the increasing organizational and social work hazards and stress within this industry. There is to date a lack of knowledge about how to improve organizational and social working conditions and decrease stress within the construction industry.

    Methods: This paper outlines the design of a controlled trial to evaluate the effectiveness of a co-created organizational-level intervention with the aim to improve role clarity, quantitative demands, staffing, planning, team effectiveness, psychosocial safety climate and stress. Two regions (> 700 employees) within one large construction company in Sweden will participate as intervention and control group. Further we present the design of the process evaluation assessing fidelity, support from managers, readiness for change and contextual factors. We will utilize questionnaires, semi-structured interviews, observations and documentation as means for data collection, hence a mixed methods approach is applied.

    Discussion: The study is expected to contribute to the understanding of how adverse organizational and social working conditions and stress can be improved within the construction industry. By applying co-creation we wish to develop an intervention and implementation strategies that fit to the context, are in line with the needs of end-users and are supported by all management levels - all of which are highlighted features in successful workplace interventions.

  • 3.
    Hagqvist, Emma
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Stress Research Institute. Mid Sweden University, Sweden.
    Vinberg, Stig
    Toivanen, Susanna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Public Health Sciences. Mälardalen University, Sweden.
    Hagström, Malin
    Granqvist, Sara
    Landstad, Bodil J.
    Falling outside the system: Occupational safety and health inspectors’ experiences of micro-enterprises in Sweden2020In: Safety Science, ISSN 0925-7535, E-ISSN 1879-1042, Vol. 125, article id 104631Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this study, 11 Swedish occupational safety and health (OSH) inspectors were interviewed about their views of and experiences interacting with micro-enterprises (1-9 employees). The qualitative content analysis found one theme, “Falling outside the system”, and three subthemes, “The inspector—shaped by specific standards”, “The bureaucrat and the micro-entrepreneur—two separate worlds”, and “System faults and system changes”. According to the inspectors, the Swedish OSH regulatory system, with inspectors on the front line, neglects the specific needs, circumstances and characteristics of micro-enterprises. Therefore, we suggest revising the OSH regulatory system and following inspection methods and enforcement styles to better address the needs of micro-enterprises.

  • 4.
    Jonsjö, Martin A.
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Stress Research Institute. Karolinska Institutet, Sweden.
    Olsson, Gunnar L.
    Wicksell, Rikard K.
    Alving, Kjell
    Holmstrom, Linda
    Andreasson, Anna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Stress Research Institute. Karolinska Institutet, Sweden.
    The role of low-grade inflammation in ME/CFS (Myalgic Encephalomyelitis/Chronic Fatigue Syndrome) - associations with symptoms2020In: Psychoneuroendocrinology, ISSN 0306-4530, E-ISSN 1873-3360, Vol. 113, article id UNSP 104578Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Patients with Myalgic Encephalomyelitis/Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (ME/CFS) often present with a range of flu-like symptoms resembling sickness behavior as well as widespread pain and concentration deficits. The aim of this study was to explore the association between inflammatory markers previously shown to be related to fatigue severity in ME/CFS and common ME/CFS symptoms post-exertional fatigue, impaired cognitive processing, musculoskeletal pain and recurrent flu-like symptoms, and the moderating effect of sex on these associations. Methods: 53 adult patients diagnosed with ME/CFS at a specialist clinic were included in the study. Fasting blood plasma was analyzed using the Olink Proseek Multiplex Inflammation panel (beta-NGF, CCL11, CXCL1, CXCL10, IL-6, IL-7, IL-8, IL-10, IL-18, TGF-alpha, TGF-beta-1 and SCF) and BioRad Human Cytokine Type 1 assay (TNF-alpha). Participants rated the average severity of symptoms (0-10) based on the 2011 International Consensus Criteria of ME/CFS during a structured clinical interview. Associations between inflammatory markers and symptom severity were analyzed using bivariate correlations and moderated regression analyses bootstrapped with 5000 repetitions. Results and conclusions: Only beta-NGF was associated with the fatigue severity measure. However, higher levels of CCL11, CXCL10, IL-7, TNF-alpha and TGF-beta-1 were significantly associated with higher levels of impaired cognitive processing and musculoskeletal pain, and sex was a significant moderator for CXCL10, IL-7 and TGF-beta-1. Future studies should investigate the relationship between inflammatory markers and key symptoms in ME/CFS in a longitudinal design in order to explore if and for whom low-grade inflammation may contribute to illness development.

  • 5. Tiuganji, Natalia M.
    et al.
    Nehme, Patricia
    Marqueze, Elaine C.
    Isherwood, Cheryl M.
    Martins, Andressa J.
    Vasconcelos, Suleima
    Cipolla-Neto, Jose
    Lowden, Arne
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Stress Research Institute.
    Skene, Debra J.
    Moreno, Claudia R. C.
    Eating Behavior (Duration, Content, and Timing) Among Workers Living under Different Levels of Urbanization2020In: Nutrients, ISSN 2072-6643, E-ISSN 2072-6643, article id 375Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Urbanization has contributed to extended wakefulness, which may in turn be associated with eating over a longer period. Here, we present a field study conducted in four groups with different work hours and places of living in order to investigate eating behavior (duration, content, and timing). Anthropometric measures were taken from the participants (rural (n = 22); town (n = 19); city-day workers (n = 11); city-night workers (n = 14)). In addition, a sociodemographic questionnaire was self-answered and 24-h food recalls were applied for three days. The 24-h food recalls revealed that fat intake varied according to the groups, with the highest consumption by the city-day workers. By contrast, city-day workers had the lowest intake of carbohydrate, whereas the rural group had the highest. In general, all groups had some degree of inadequacy in food consumption. Eating duration was negatively correlated with total energy intake, fat, and protein consumption in the rural and town groups. There was a positive correlation between body mass index and eating duration in both city groups. The rural group had the earliest start time of eating, and this was associated with a lower body mass index. This study suggested that food content and timing, as well as eating duration, differed according to place of living, which in turn may be linked to lifestyle.

  • 6.
    Åkerstedt, Torbjörn
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Stress Research Institute. Karolinska Institutet, Sweden.
    Lekander, Mats
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Stress Research Institute. Karolinska Institutet, Sweden.
    Nilsonne, Gustav
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Stress Research Institute. Karolinska Institutet, Sweden.
    Tamm, Sandra
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Stress Research Institute. Karolinska Institutet, Sweden.
    d'Onofrio, Paolo
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Stress Research Institute. Karolinska Institutet, Sweden.
    Kecklund, Göran
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Stress Research Institute. Karolinska Institutet, Sweden.
    Fischer, Håkan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Biological psychology.
    Schwarz, Johanna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Stress Research Institute. Karolinska Institutet, Sweden.
    Petrovic, Predrag
    Månsson, Kristoffer NT
    Gray Matter Volume Correlates of Sleepiness: A Voxel-Based Morphometry Study in Younger and Older Adults2020In: Nature and Science of Sleep, ISSN 1179-1608, Vol. 12, p. 289-298Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Subjectively experienced sleepiness is a problem in society, possibly linked with gray matter (GM) volume. Given a different sleep pattern, aging may affect such associations, possibly due to shrinking brain volume.

    Purpose: The purpose of the present study was to investigate the association between subjectively rated sleepiness and GM volume in thalamus, insula, hippocampus, and orbitofrontal cortex of young and older adults, after a normal night’s sleep.

    Methods: Eighty-four healthy individuals participated (46 aged 20– 30 years, and 38 aged 65– 75 years). Morphological brain data were collected in a 3T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanner. Sleepiness was rated multiple times during the imaging sessions.

    Results: In older, relative to younger, adults, clusters within bilateral mid-anterior insular cortex and right thalamus were negatively associated with sleepiness. Adjustment for the immediately preceding total sleep time eliminated the significant associations.

    Conclusion: Self-rated momentary sleepiness in a monotonous situation appears to be negatively associated with GM volume in clusters within both thalamus and insula in older individuals, and total sleep time seems to play a role in this association. Possibly, this suggests that larger GM volume in these clusters may be protective against sleepiness in older individuals. This notion needs confirmation in further studies.

1 - 6 of 6
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf