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  • 1. Allebeck, P.
    et al.
    Andréasson, S.
    Bränström, R.
    Leifman, Håkan
    Ramstedt, Mats
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Romelsjö, Anders
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Alkoholen i Stockholm: tillgänglighet, konsumtion, skador2004Report (Other academic)
  • 2. Andersson, Filip
    et al.
    Sundin, Erica
    Magnusson, Cecilia
    Ramstedt, Mats
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Public Health Sciences. Karolinska Institutet, Sweden; The Swedish Council for Information on Alcohol and Other Drugs, Sweden.
    Galanti, Maria Rosaria
    Prevalence of cannabis use among young adults in Sweden comparing randomized response technique with a traditional survey2023In: Addiction, ISSN 0965-2140, E-ISSN 1360-0443, Vol. 118, no 9, p. 1801-1810Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background and Aims: The prevalence of cannabis use based on self-reports is likely to be underestimated in population surveys, especially in contexts where its use is a criminal offence. Indirect survey methods ask sensitive questions ensuring that answers cannot be identified with an individual respondent, therefore potentially resulting in more reliable estimates. We aimed to measure whether the indirect survey method ‘randomized response technique’ (RRT) increased response rate and/or increased disclosure of cannabis use among young adults compared with a traditional survey.

    Design: We conducted two parallel nation-wide surveys during the spring and the summer of 2021. The first survey was a traditional questionnaire-based one (focusing on substance use and gambling). The second survey applied an indirect survey method known as ‘the cross-wise model’ to questions related to cannabis use. The two surveys employed identical procedures (e.g. invitations, reminders and wording of the questions)

    Setting and Participants: The participants were young adults (aged 18–29 years) living in Sweden. The traditional survey had 1200 respondents (56.9% women) and the indirect survey had 2951 respondents (53.6% women).

    Measurements: In both surveys, cannabis use was assessed according to three time-frames: life-time use; use during the past year; and use during the past 30 days.

    Findings: The estimated prevalence of cannabis use was two- to threefold higher on all measures when estimated using the indirect survey method compared with the traditional survey: use during life-time (43.2 versus 27.3%); during the past year (19.2 versus 10.4%); and during the past 30 days (13.2 versus 3.7%). The discrepancy was larger among males and individuals with an education shorter than 10 years, who were unemployed, and who were born in non-European countries.

    Conclusions: Indirect survey methods may provide more accurate estimates than traditional surveys on prevalence of self-reported cannabis use.

  • 3.
    Axelsson Sohlberg, Tove
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Ramstedt, Mats
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Tal om tobak 2008: Tobakskonsumtionen i Sverige 20082009Report (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [sv]

    Under år 2008 fördes cirka 424 miljoner cigaretter in i Sverige från utlandet i samband med svenskars utlandsresor. I jämförelse med år 2007 har ingen förändring skett. Antalet köpta smuggelcigaretter har däremot ökat mellan 2007 och 2008 från 144 miljoner till 440 miljoner dvs. med cirka 205 procent. Köp av privatimporterade cigaretter, det vill säga köp av cigaretter som privatpersoner lagligt fört in i landet och sålt vidare utan kommersiellt syfte, uppgick år 2008 till cirka 134 miljoner vilket i jämförelse med år 2007 är en ökning med cirka 6 procent. Sammantaget så ökade därmed den oregistrerade cigarettkonsumtionen under 2008 med cirka 44 procent i jämförelse med 2007 (998 miljoner mot 694 miljoner). Den registrerade (i Sverige beskattade) cigarettförsäljningen minskade under 2008 samtidigt som den oregistrerade cigarettkonsumtionens andel av den totala cigarettkonsumtionen (det vill säga den registrerade och den oregistrerade sammantaget), ökade från 9,5 procent under 2007 till 14 procent för 2008. Den totala cigarettkonsumtionen fortsätter dock att minska under 2008 och var ca 2,7 procent lägre än 2007 och 7,7 procent lägre än 2006. Denna utveckling får stöd i andra uppgifter som visar att andelen dagligrökare minskat under samma period. I denna rapport skattades också den oregistrerade snuskonsumtionen för år 2008 vilken uppgick till cirka 30,8 miljoner dosor varav 17 miljoner var resandeinförda (främst från Finland) och cirka 9,7 miljoner hade beställts via Internet. Köp av smuggelsnus uppgick till cirka 4 miljoner dosor. Detta är i jämförelse med år 2007 en total ökning med cirka 320 procent (30,8 miljoner mot 7,3 miljoner).

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    Tal om tobak 2008: Tobakskonsumtionen i Sverige 2008
  • 4.
    Boman, Ulrika
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Hradilova Selin, Klara
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Ramstedt, Mats
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Svensson, Johan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Alkoholkonsumtionen i Sverige fram till 20062007Report (Other academic)
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    FULLTEXT01
  • 5.
    Engdahl, Barbro
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Ramstedt, Mats
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Is the population level link between drinking and harm similar for women and men?: a time series analysis with focus on gender-specific drinking and alcohol-related hospitalizations in Sweden2011In: European Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1101-1262, E-ISSN 1464-360X, Vol. 21, no 4, p. 432-437Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: A question that has not been addressed in the literature is whether the population level association between alcohol and harm differs between men and women. The main aim of this article is to fill this gap by analysing recently collected time series data of male and female self-reported drinking in relation to gender-specific harm indicators in Sweden. Methods: Male and female per capita and risk consumption was estimated on the basis of self-reported data from monthly alcohol surveys for the period 2002-07. Overall per capita consumption including recorded sales and estimates of unrecorded consumption were also collected for the same period. Alcohol-related hospitalizations were used as indicators of alcohol-related harm. Data were aggregated into quarterly observations and analysed by means of time series analyses (ARIMA-modelling). Results: Overall per capita consumption was significantly related to both male and female alcohol-related hospitalizations. Male per capita consumption and risk consumption were also significantly related to alcohol-related hospitalizations among men. Female per capita consumption and risk consumption had also a positive association with alcohol-related hospitalizations but statistical significance was only reached for alcohol poisonings where the association was even stronger than for men. Conclusions: Changes in alcohol consumption in Sweden was associated with changes in male and female alcohol-related hospitalizations also in analyses based on gender-specific consumption measures. There was no clear evidence that the population level association between alcohol and harm differed between men and women.

  • 6. Fugelstad, Anna
    et al.
    Ågren, Gunnar
    Ramstedt, Mats
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Public Health Sciences. Karolinska Institute, Sweden; Swedish Council for Information on Alcohol and Other Drugs (CAN), Sweden.
    Thiblin, Ingmar
    Hjelmström, Peter
    Oxycodone-related deaths in Sweden 2006-20182022In: Drug And Alcohol Dependence, ISSN 0376-8716, E-ISSN 1879-0046, Vol. 234, article id 109402Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: To identify and characterize oxycodone related deaths in Sweden from 2006 to 2018 and to compare them to other opioid-related deaths.

    Methods: To assess the factors contributing to the deaths, we used multinomial logistic regression to compare oxycodone-related deaths extracted from all forensic autopsy examinations and toxicology cases in the age groups 15-34 (reference group), 35-54 and 55-74 with regard to sex, presence of benzodiazepines and alcohol at the time of death, prescription of oxycodone, benzodiazepines and antidepressants, previous substance use related (SUD) treatment, and manner of death. The oxycodone related deaths were compared with deaths with presence of other opioids.

    Result: We identified 575 oxycodone-related deaths, and the rate increased during the study period from 0.10 to 1.12 per 100,000 in parallel with an increase of oxycodone prescriptions from 3.17 to 30.33 per 1000. Oxycodone-related deaths amounted to 10.0% of all opioid-related deaths. The deaths occurred mainly in older patients previously being prescribed oxycodone. Benzodiazepines were present at the time of death in 403 (70%) and alcohol in 259 (45%). Prescriptions of any opioid for pain (61%), oxycodone (50%), benzodiazepines (67%) and antidepressants (55%) were common. Only 15% had received treatment for SUD during the last year.

    Conclusion: Oxycodone-related deaths increased in Sweden between 2006 and 2018 in parallel to an increase in oxycodone prescriptions. The increase occurred mainly in older patients being prescribed oxycodone for pain. There might be specific interventions needed to avoid oxycodone-related deaths compared to other opioidrelated deaths associated with illicit opioid use.

  • 7. Gripe, Isabella
    et al.
    Danielsson, Anna-Karin
    Karlsson, Patrik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Thor, Siri
    Ramstedt, Mats
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Public Health Sciences. Karolinska Institutet, Sweden; The Swedish Council for Information on Alcohol and Other Drugs, Sweden.
    Are the well‐off youth in Sweden more likely to use cannabis?2021In: Drug and Alcohol Review, ISSN 0959-5236, E-ISSN 1465-3362, Vol. 40, no 1, p. 126-134Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction and Aims. Results from previous research are inconsistent regarding the association between socioeconomic status (SES) and cannabis use among adolescents. Since there are risks associated with cannabis use, a social gradient in cannabis use may contribute to reproducing socioeconomic differences in life opportunities. The aim of this study was to assess the association between childhood SES and cannabis use among youth in Sweden. Design and Methods. We used repeated cross‐sectional data from three waves (2014–2016) of the Swedish national school survey among 11th graders. The analysis encompassed 9497 individuals in 668 school classes. Childhood SES was measured through parents' highest education, as reported by the students. Cannabis use was measured in terms of lifetime use and frequency of use. Data were analysed using multi‐level mixed‐effects Poisson regression. Results. Adolescents with at least 1 parent with university/college education had 17% (incidence rate ratio 1.17, confidence interval 1.05, 1.30) higher risk of lifetime use of cannabis compared with those whose parents had no university/college education, adjusting for sex, SES of the school environment, academic orientation, truancy, risk assessment and parental permissiveness. Among life‐time users of cannabis, risk for frequent cannabis use was 28% (incidence rate ratio 0.72, confidence interval 0.53, 0.97) lower for those with at least 1 parent with university or college education. Discussion and Conclusions. Childhood SES, in terms of parental education, was associated with cannabis use among Swedish adolescents. Adolescents from families with lower SES were less likely to ever try cannabis, but at higher risk for frequent use.

  • 8. Jarl, Johan
    et al.
    Johansson, Pia
    Eriksson, Antonina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Eriksson, Mimmi
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Gerdtham, Ulf-G.
    Hemström, Örjan
    Hradilova Selin, Klara
    Ramstedt, Mats
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Till vilket pris?: Om alkoholens kostnader och hälsoeffekter i Sverige 20022006Report (Other academic)
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    FULLTEXT01
  • 9. Johansson, Pia
    et al.
    Jarl, Johan
    Eriksson, Antonina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Eriksson, Mimmi
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Gertham, Ulf-G.
    Hemström, Örjan
    Hradilova Selin, Klara
    Lenke, Leif
    Ramstedt, Mats
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Room, Robin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD). La Trobe University, Australia.
    The Social Costs of Alcohol in Sweden 20022006Report (Other academic)
    Download full text (pdf)
    The Social Costs of Alcohol in Sweden 2002
  • 10.
    Kraus, Ludwig
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Public Health Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD). IFT Institut für Therapieforschung, Germany; ELTE Eötvös Loránd University, Hungary.
    Loy, Johanna K.
    Olderbak, Sally
    Trolldal, Björn
    Ramstedt, Mats
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Public Health Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD). Karolinska Institutet, Sweden; The Swedish Council for Information on Alcohol and Other Drugs (CAN), Sweden.
    Svensson, Johan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Public Health Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD). The Swedish Council for Information on Alcohol and Other Drugs (CAN), Sweden.
    Törrönen, Jukka
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Public Health Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Does the decline in Swedish adolescent drinking persist into early adulthood?2024In: Addiction, ISSN 0965-2140, E-ISSN 1360-0443, Vol. 119, no 2, p. 259-267Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background and aims: Sweden has experienced a substantial decrease in adolescent drinking over the past decades. Whether the reduction persists into early adulthood remains unclear. Using survey data, the present study aimed to determine whether reductions in indicators of alcohol use observed among adolescents remain in early adulthood and whether changes in alcohol intake are consistent among light/moderate and heavy drinkers.

    Design: Data from the Swedish monthly Alcohol Monitoring Survey (2001–20) were used to construct five 5-year birth cohorts (1978–82, 1983–87, 1988–92, 1993–97 and 1998–2002).

    Setting: Sweden.

    Participants: A total of n = 52 847 respondents (48% females) aged 16 and 30 years were included in this study.

    Measurements: For both males and females, temporal changes in the prevalence of any drinking, the prevalence of heavy episodic drinking (HED) and total alcohol intake in the past 30 days in centilitres were analysed.

    Findings: The prevalence of any drinking in more recent cohorts remained low until young people came into their early (females) and mid- (males) 20s. Male cohorts differed in the prevalence of HED across age, with the later cohorts showing lower odds than earlier cohorts (odds ratios between 0.54 and 0.66). Among females, no systematic differences between cohorts across age could be observed. Later male birth cohorts in light/moderate drinkers had lower alcohol intake than earlier cohorts (correlation coefficients between −0.09 and −0.54). No statistically significant cohort effects were found for male heavy drinkers. Although differences in alcohol intake among females diminished as age increased, the cohorts did not differ systematically in their level of alcohol intake.

    Conclusions: In Sweden, the reduced uptake of drinking in adolescents appears to fade as people move into adulthood. Observed reductions in alcohol intake among light and moderate drinkers appear to persist into adulthood. More recent male cohorts show a lower prevalence rate of heavy episodic drinking.

  • 11.
    Kühlhorn, Eckart
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Ramstedt, Mats
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    The total amount of alcohol consumed in Sweden: recent findings and methodological considerations2000In: Sweden and the European Union: changes in national alcohol policy and their consequences / [ed] Harold D. Holder, Stockholm: Almqvist & Wiksell International , 2000, p. 63-78Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 12.
    Landberg, Jonas
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Public Health Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD). Karolinska Institutet, Sweden; The Swedish Council for Information on Alcohol and Other Drugs, Sweden.
    Hemmingsson, Tomas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Public Health Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Sydén, Lovisa
    Ramstedt, Mats
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Public Health Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    The Contribution of Alcohol Use, Other Lifestyle Factors and Working Conditions to Socioeconomic Differences in Sickness Absence2020In: European Addiction Research, ISSN 1022-6877, E-ISSN 1421-9891, Vol. 26, no 1, p. 40-51Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: This study investigates how alcohol use contributes to the social gradient in sickness absence. Other factors assessed include lifestyle factors (smoking, physical activity and body mass index), physical and psychosocial working conditions. Methods: The study used baseline data from the Stockholm public health cohort 2006, with an analytical sample of 17,008 respondents aged 25-64 years. Outcome variables included self-reported short-term (<14 days) and register-based long-term (>14 days) sickness absence. Socioeconomic position (SEP) was measured by occupational class. Alcohol use was measured by average weekly volume and frequency of heavy episodic drinking. Negative binominal regression was used to estimate sex-specific SEP differences in sickness absence, before and after adjusting for alcohol use and the additional explanatory factors. Results: Adjusting for alcohol use attenuated the SEP differences in long-term sickness absence by 20% for men and 14% for women. Alcohol use explained a smaller proportion of the differences in short-term sickness absence. Alcohol use in combination with other lifestyle factors attenuated the SEP differences (20-35%) for both outcomes. Physical working conditions explained more than half of the gradient in long-term sickness absence, whereas psychosocial conditions had greater impact on short-term sickness absence among men. Discussion/Conclusion: Alcohol use explains a substantial proportion of the SEP disparities in long-term sickness absence among men. The effect is smaller among women and for short-term sickness absence. Our findings support the notion that physical working conditions constitute the key explanatory variable for SEP differences in long-term sickness absence, but add that psychosocial working conditions have greater impact on the gradient in short-term sickness absence among men.

  • 13.
    Landberg, Jonas
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Public Health Sciences. Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Ramstedt, Mats
    Distribution of sickness absence risk across different levels and patterns of drinking: findings from the Stockholm Public Health Cohort2021In: Nordic Studies on Alcohol and Drugs, ISSN 1455-0725, E-ISSN 1458-6126, Vol. 38, no 3, p. 305-318Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: This study estimated (i) the risk function between different indicators of alcohol use and long-term sickness absence, adjusting for possible confounding factors, (ii) whether the risk function between average volume of consumption and sickness absence is modified by heavy episodic drinking (HED), and (iii) to what extent the risk for sickness absence among abstainers is due to health selection bias. Data and methods: The study was based on data from the Stockholm Public Health Cohort 2006, with an analytical sample of 16,477 respondents aged 18–64 years. The outcome included register-based long-term (> 14 days) sickness absence. Negative binominal regression was used to estimate the association between sickness absence and average weekly volume of consumption, frequency of HED, and both in interaction. Results: Abstainers, chronic heavy drinkers and respondents with the highest frequency of HED had approximately two-fold higher rates of sickness absence relative to the reference groups, i.e., moderate drinkers and those with HED one to 6 times per year. Adjustment for confounding factors did not materially affect the shape of the risk function. After exclusion of abstainers with alcohol-related problems, or poor health, the estimates for abstainers became non-significant. Moderate drinkers with HED did not have significantly higher rates of sickness absence than moderate drinkers without HED. Conclusions: Our results suggest a significant association between alcohol use and sickness absence. There were indications that the U-shaped risk function may largely be due to health selection bias among abstainers. We found no indication of effect modification of HED on moderate drinking.

  • 14. Nordström, T.
    et al.
    Ramstedt, Mats
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Mortality and population drinking: a review of the literature2005In: Drug and Alcohol Review, ISSN 0959-5236, E-ISSN 1465-3362, Vol. 24, no 6, p. 537-547Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this review was to review research addressing the relationship between population drinking and health, particularly mortality. The review is based primarily on articles published in international journals after 1994 to February 2005, identified via Medline. The method used in most studies is time-series analysis based on autoregressive intergrated moving average (ARIMA) modelling. The outcome measures covered included the following mortality indicators: mortality from liver cirrhosis and other alcohol-related diseases, accident mortality, suicide, homicide, ischaemic heart disease (IHD) mortality and all-cause mortality. The study countries included most of the EU member states as of 1995 (14 countries), Canada and the United States. For Eastern Europe there was only scanty evidence. The study period was in most cases the post-war period. There was a statistically significant relationship between per capita consumption and mortality from liver cirrhosis and other alcohol-related diseases in all countries. In about half the countries, there was a significant relationship between consumption, on one hand, and mortality from accidents and homicide as well as all-cause mortality on the other hand. A link between alcohol and suicide was found in all regions except for mid- and southern Europe. There was no systematic link between consumption and IHD mortality. Overall, a 1-litre increase in per capita consumption was associated with a stronger effect in northern Europe and Canada than in mid- and southern Europe. Research during the past decade has strengthened the notion of a relationship between population drinking and alcohol-related harm. At the same time, the marked regional variation in the magnitude of this relationship suggests the importance of drinking patterns for modifying the impact of alcohol. By and large, there was little evidence for any cardioprotective effect at the population level. It is a challenge for future research to reconcile this outcome with the findings from observational studies, most of which suggest a protective effect of moderate drinking.

  • 15. Nordström, T.
    et al.
    Ramstedt, Mats
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Vad händer i alkoholfrågan?: Politik, konsumtion och skador i dagens Sverige2005In: Framtider : bulletin, ISSN 0281-0492, no 4, p. 14-18Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 16.
    Norström, Thor
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Hemström, Örjan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS).
    Leifman, Håkan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Ramstedt, Mats
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Trolldal, Björn
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Concluding policy implications2002In: Alcohol in Postwar Europe: Consumption, Drinking Patterns, Consequences and Policy Responses in 15 European Countries / [ed] Norström, T., Stockholm: National Institute of Public Health [Folkhälsoinstitutet] :Almqvist & Wiksell International , 2002, p. 220-225Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 17.
    Norström, Thor
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Hemström, Örjan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS).
    Leifman, Håkan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Ramstedt, Mats
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Trolldal, Björn
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Conclusions2002In: Alcohol in Postwar Europe: Consumption, Drinking Patterns, Consequences and Policy Responses in 15 European Countries / [ed] Norström, T., Stockholm: National Institute of Public Health and Almqvist & Wiksell International , 2002, p. 185-194Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 18.
    Norström, Thor
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Hemström, Örjan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS).
    Ramstedt, Mats
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Rossow, Ingeborg
    Skog, Ole-Jørgen
    Mortality and population drinking2002In: Alcohol in postwar Europe: consumption, drinking patterns, consequences and policy responses in 15 European countries / [ed] Thor Norström, Stockholm: National Institute of Public Health [Folkhälsoinstitutet] , 2002, p. 157-176Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 19.
    Norström, Thor
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Miller, Ted
    Services Research Institute Pacific Institute for Research and Evaluation Calverton, MD, USA.
    Holder, Harald
    Prevention Research Center Pacific Institute for Research and Evaluation Berkeley, CA, USA.
    Österberg, Esa
    Alcohol and Drug Research National Institute for Health and Welfare, Helsinki, Finland.
    Ramstedt, Mats
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Rossow, Ingeborg
    Norwegian Institute for Alcohol and Drug Research Oslo, Norway.
    Stockwell, Tim
    Centre for Addictions Research of BC Department of Psychology University of Victoria Victoria, BC, Canada .
    Potential Consequences of Replacing a Retail Alcohol Monopoly with a Private License System: Results from Sweden2010In: Addiction, ISSN 0965-2140, E-ISSN 1360-0443, Vol. 105, no 12, p. 2113-2119Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim  To examine the potential effects of replacing the Swedish alcohol retail system with a private licensing system on alcohol consumption and alcohol-related harm.

    Design  Two possible scenarios were analysed: (1) replacing the current alcohol retail monopoly with private licensed stores that specialize in alcohol sales or (2) making all alcohol available in grocery stores. We utilized a multiplicative model that projected effects of changes in a set of key factors including hours of sale, retail prices, promotion and advertising and outlet density. Next, we estimated the effect of the projected consumption increase on a set of harm indicators. Values for the model parameters were obtained from the research literature.

    Measurements  Measures of alcohol-related harm included explicitly alcohol-related mortality, accident mortality, suicide, homicide, assaults, drinking driving and sickness absence.

    Findings  According to the projections, scenario 1 yields a consumption increase of 17% (1.4 litres/capita), which in turn would cause an additional 770 deaths, 8500 assaults, 2700 drinking driving offences and 4.5 million sick days per year. The corresponding figures for scenario 2 are a consumption increase of 37.4% (3.1 litres/capita) leading to an additional annual toll of 2000 deaths, 20 000 assaults, 6600 drinking driving offences and 11.1 million days of sick leave.

    Conclusions  Projections based on the research literature suggest that privatization of the Swedish alcohol retail market would significantly increase alcohol consumption and alcohol-related harm.

  • 20.
    Norström, Thor
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Ramstedt, Mats
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Alkoholrelaterade problem: spelar det någon roll varifrån alkoholen kommer?2008Report (Other academic)
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    FULLTEXT01
  • 21.
    Norström, Thor
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Ramstedt, Mats
    The Link Between Alcohol Sales and Alcohol-Related Harm in Finland, 1995-20162020In: Journal of Studies on Alcohol and Drugs, ISSN 1937-1888, E-ISSN 1938-4114, Vol. 81, no 5, p. 641-646Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [sv]

    Objective:

    A key assumption in Finnish alcohol policy is that the officially registered alcohol consumption (i.e., alcohol sales) is closely related to alcohol-related harm. During the last two decades, a sizable part of total alcohol consumption, however, comprises unrecorded consumption, which may potentially make alcohol sales less powerful as a predictor of alcohol-related harm. This article thus aims to estimate the relationship between alcohol sales and alcohol-related harm on the basis of more recent Finnish time-series data.

    Method:

    Data on alcohol sales (liters of 100% alcohol/capita age 15 years and older) were obtained from the National Institute for Health and Welfare in Finland. As indicators of harm, we used police-reported assaults and three forms of mortality: alcohol-specific mortality, accidents, and suicide. Quarterly data on mortality and alcohol sales spanned the period 1995–2016, and data on police-reported offenses covered the period 1990–2016. Data were analyzed by SARIMA (Seasonal Autoregressive Integrated Moving Average) modeling.

    Results:

    A positive and significant association between alcohol sales and all harm indicators was found. A 1-L increase in alcohol sales per capita was associated with a 20% increase in alcohol-specific mortality, a 12% increase in assaults, and a 5%–6% increase in accidents and suicide. These estimates are in line with earlier findings estimated on data for the period when unrecorded alcohol consumption was less common in Finland.

    Conclusions:

    The results provide support for a continued strong relationship between alcohol sales and alcohol-related harm in Finland. Policy measures aimed at lowering alcohol sales were supported from these results.

  • 22.
    Ramstedt, Mats
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Alcohol and fatal accidents in the United States - - a time series analysis for 1950-20022007Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    Aims. To estimate the association between per capita alcohol consumption and fatal accidents in the United States and to compare the outcome with findings from Europe and Canada. Data and method. Yearly data on fatal accidents by gender and age were analysed in relation to per capita alcohol consumption for 1950-2002 using the Box-Jenkins technique for time series analysis. Findings. A one-litre increase in per capita consumption was on average followed by 4.4 male deaths per 100,000 inhabitants, but had no significant effect on female accident mortality. Regarding specific categories of accidents, the effect on fatal motor vehicle accidents accounted for a large part of the overall effect for men and was also significant for women. With respect to fatal falling accidents and other accidents, the only significant effects were found among young males. In comparison with Europe, the extent to which changes in per capita consumption cause accidents in the United States is similar to the pattern for Northern Europe, particularly regarding overall accidents, whereas for falls and traffic accidents, the results are similar to those for Southern Europe. In comparison with Canada, a one-litre change in per capita consumption causes about the same amount of change in accidents overall and motor vehicle accidents, but fewer accidental falls and other accidents. Conclusions. Per capita alcohol consumption has at least partly been an explanation for the development of male fatal accidents and particularly motor vehicle accident rates in the post-war United States. A high traffic density and relatively soft BAC laws are suggested to explain the strong association found between alcohol and fatal motor vehicle accidents. The results also suggest that a reduction in per capita consumption would have its most preventive impact on fatal accidents in younger males.

  • 23.
    Ramstedt, Mats
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Alcohol and mortality in EU: findings from the ECAS-project2000In: Health Determinants in the EU: Évora Conference Proceedings, Brussels: European Commission , 2000, p. 204-213Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 24.
    Ramstedt, Mats
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Alcohol and pancreatitis mortality at the population level: experiences from 14 western countries2004In: Addiction, ISSN 0965-2140, E-ISSN 1360-0443, Vol. 99, no 10, p. 1255-1261Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims  To test if there is relationship between alcohol consumption and pancreatitis mortality at the population level.

    Data and methods  Annual pancreatitis death rates for 1950–95 were converted into age-adjusted mortality rates per 100 000 inhabitants. Per capita alcohol consumption was measured by alcohol sales. The relationship was estimated with time-series analysis on data from 14 western countries. Several models were tested with different assumptions about risk function and lag structure.

    Results  According to the assumed most appropriate model, a positive relationship was found in each country, and statistical significance was reached in all countries except from Finland, Italy and Canada. The magnitude of the association was fairly consistent across countries, with the alcohol effect parameters ranging between 0.05 and 0.14. However, Sweden and Norway deviated from this pattern with estimates between 0.30 and 0.40.

    Conclusions  Pancreatitis joins a wide range of causes of death where the mortality rate is influenced by per capita alcohol consumption, and more so in northern Europe. It is suggested that pancreatitis mortality is an important indicator of alcohol-related harm, not least because a large amount of morbidity is likely to be connected to the mortality rate.

  • 25.
    Ramstedt, Mats
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Alcohol and suicide at the population level: the Canadian experience2005In: Drug and Alcohol Review, ISSN 0959-5236, E-ISSN 1465-3362, Vol. 24, no 3, p. 203-208Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Studies suggest that the population level link between alcohol and suicide differs across countries and between men and women. The aim of this paper was to estimate the relationship between alcohol consumption and suicide in Canada and to put the results in a comparative perspective. The relationship was elucidated for whole Canada, different provinces and also separately for men and women. The total suicide rate in Canada increased significantly by around 4% as alcohol consumption increased by one litre per capita, suggesting that approximately 25 - 30% of Canadian suicides were related to alcohol. The relationship was stronger for women than for men. A significant effect was found in all provinces except from Quebec, but the overall regional variation was not statistically significant. In an international perspective, the relationship for women was somewhat weaker than in Sweden and Norway, but larger than in Finland, the United States and Southern European countries. For men, the association was similar to what is found in the United States and Finland, weaker than in Sweden, Norway and Russia but stronger than in Southern European countries. The results only partly support the idea that intoxication frequency explains national differences in this relationship. Possible explanations for the stronger association among women are also discussed.

  • 26.
    Ramstedt, Mats
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Alcohol and suicide in 14 European Countries2001In: Addiction, ISSN 0965-2140, E-ISSN 1360-0443, Vol. 96, no Supplement 1, p. 59-75Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims. To test the hypothesis that a positive population-level relationship between alcohol and suicide is more likely to be found in dry drinking cultures (as indicated by consumption level) than in wet drinking cultures. Design. Gender- and age-specific suicide rates in 14 western European countries were analysed in relation to per capita alcohol consumption employing the Box-Jenkins technique for time series analysis. The country-specific estimates were pooled into low-, medium- and high-consumption countries. Measurements. Suicide mortality data for 5-year age groups were converted into gender- and age-specific mortality rates. Alcohol sales expressed as litres of 100% alcohol per year and inhabitants 15 years and older were used as a measure of alcohol consumption. Findings. A positive and significant relationship between per capita consumption and gender- and age-specific suicide rates was revealed most often in northern Europe and found least often in southern Europe. A stronger absolute alcohol effect for men was found only in northern Europe, whereas the relative alcohol effect was somewhat stronger for women in both northern and central Europe. Also, the suicide rate in younger age groups was more often significantly related to per capita consumption than suicide among the elder in northern and central Europe but not in southern Europe. Conclusions. The population-level association between alcohol and suicide is conditioned by cultural factors. In general, the suicide rate tends to be more responsive to changes in alcohol consumption in drinking cultures characterized by a low post-war per capita consumption compared to drinking cultures with higher consumption levels. The findings give support to the hypothesis derived from previous theoretical and empirical work, suggesting that suicide and alcohol is more closely connected in dry cultures than in wet cultures.

  • 27.
    Ramstedt, Mats
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Alcohol consumption and alcohol-related mortality in Canada, 1950-20002004In: Canadian journal of public health, ISSN 0008-4263, E-ISSN 1920-7476, Vol. 95, no 2, p. 121-126Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE:

    To describe trends in overall alcohol consumption and alcohol-related mortality in Canada, and to test regional associations between per capita alcohol consumption and alcohol-related mortality.

    METHOD:

    Alcohol sales for 1950-2000 were used to measure total alcohol consumption; alcohol-related mortality consisted of nine different alcohol-related causes of death for 1950-1998. Alcohol consumption and alcohol-related mortality were described for 1950-2000, and measures of dispersion were calculated to assess the homogeneity across regions.

    FINDINGS:

    Both alcohol consumption and alcohol-related mortality increased in all regions up to 1975-80 and then underwent a decline until the 1990s. Since 1996, consumption began to increase. Beer represented more than half of the total consumption throughout the study period, although overall, the share of wine increased, particularly in the larger provinces. Over time there have been fewer differences in per capita consumption and alcohol-related mortality rates across the regions. A strong positive cross-regional relationship was observed between explicitly alcohol-related mortality and per capita consumption, whereas cirrhosis showed only a weak geographical association with consumption.

    CONCLUSIONS:

    Since 1950, there has been a general trend toward national homogenization, especially with respect to drinking levels but also to alcohol-related mortality. A strikingly close regional relationship between alcohol consumption and alcohol-related mortality suggests that consumption is an important marker of alcohol-related harm in Canada.

  • 28.
    Ramstedt, Mats
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Alcohol consumption and liver cirrhosis mortality - the population level link2007Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    Abstract

    Liver cirrhosis mortality is often used to indicate changes in population-level alcohol harm. One important rationale for this idea is the large body of evidence of a link at the aggregate level, showing that high levels of population drinking tend to be associated with high cirrhosis rates. One aim of the presentation is to review recent research addressing the relationship between population drinking and liver cirrhosis mortality in Europe with focus on studies using a similar methodology (ARIMA time series analyses). To what extent is higher alcohol consumption associated with higher rates of cirrhosis mortality in different European countries? A second aim is to focus on the recent development in Sweden. Have recent trends in alcohol consumption been associated with expected changes in liver cirrhosis mortality and morbidity?

  • 29.
    Ramstedt, Mats
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Alcohol consumption and the experience of adverse consequences: a comparison of six European countries2002In: Contemporary Drug Problems, ISSN 0091-4509, E-ISSN 2163-1808, Vol. 29, no 3, p. 549-575Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper describes prevalence rates of self-reported experiences of alcohol-related problems in six Western European countries and examines how self-reported consumption of alcohol is associated with the likelihood of experiencing these problems. Of particular interest is to assess whether alcohol is more strongly associated with the likelihood of experiencing adverse consequences in Northern Europe than in countries in Central and Southern Europe. Data on self-reported volume of drinking and binge drinking and of experiences of various alcohol-related problems from a general population survey undertaken in Finland, Sweden, Germany, the UK, France and Italy during the spring of 2000 were analyzed. The number of respondents was about 1,000 men and women (ages 18-64) in each country. In the assessment of the link between drinking and harm, results showed that the overall prevalence of alcohol-related harm was highest in Finland and the UK and lowest in Southern Europe. A general positive association was found between volume of drinking and problems, although some country differences were observed. The risk curve analysis also revealed that problems occurred at fairly low drinking levels. In the multivariate logistic regression analyses, the volume of drinking and a measure of binge drinking were both statistically significant predictors of most problems in most countries. A major conclusion is that both volume of drinking and binge drinking are important determinants of the risk of experiencing adverse consequences from drinking in all six European countries.

  • 30.
    Ramstedt, Mats
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Alcohol-related mortality in 15 European countries in the postwar period2002In: Alcohol in postwar Europe: consumption, drinking patterns, consequences and policy responses in 15 European countries / [ed] Thor Norström, Stockholm: National Institute of Public Health [Folkhälsoinstitutet] , 2002, p. 137-156Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 31.
    Ramstedt, Mats
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Alcohol-related mortality in 15 European countries in the postwar period2002In: European Journal of Population, ISSN 0168-6577, E-ISSN 1572-9885, Vol. 18, no 4, p. 307-323Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this paper isto assess postwar differences and trends inalcohol-related mortality in the currentEuropean Union (minus Luxembourg plus Norway)on the basis of liver cirrhosis mortality anddeaths with explicit mention of alcohol,primarily alcohol dependence, alcohol psychosisand alcohol poisoning (AAA). The questionof the extent to which these indicators arecomparable across Western European countries isalso addressed. A marked north-south gradientwas found for cirrhosis mortality, with thehighest rates revealed in Southern Europe andthe lowest in Northern Europe. However, thisgradient weakened with the passage of time andthe initially quite substantial regionaldifferences declined during the latter part ofthe study period. Explicitly alcohol-relatedmortality (AAA), on the other hand, showed areverse cross-national pattern with the highestrates in the north and the lowest in the south.A positive cross-national relationship wasobserved between cirrhosis and per capitaconsumption but this match was not improved bycombining cirrhosis with explicitlyalcohol-related causes. Nevertheless, withinSouthern, Central and Northern Europeancountries the relationship between per capitaconsumption and AAA-mortality was positive. Itis concluded that cirrhosis mortality is usefulfor making rough national comparisons in aWestern European context whereas the validityof explicitly alcohol-related mortality isquestionable. Cultural differences in recordingpractices and drinking patterns are discussedas possible determinants of geographicaldifferences in AAA-mortality.

  • 32.
    Ramstedt, Mats
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Alkoholens roll i den globala och regionala sjukdomsbördan2003In: Nordisk Alkohol- og narkotikatidsskrift (NAT), ISSN 1455-0725, E-ISSN 1458-6126, Vol. 20, no 6, p. 429-437Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 33.
    Ramstedt, Mats
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Alkoholkonsumtion och alkoholrelaterade problem bland äldre svenskar – hur ser det ut egentligen?2009Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 34.
    Ramstedt, Mats
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Alkoholkonsumtion och risken för alkoholrelaterade problem bland svenska kvinnor och män: en riskkurvsanalys2004In: Svenska dryckesvanor och deras konsekvenser i början av det nya millenniet / [ed] Hradilova Selin, K., Stockholm: SoRAD , 2004, p. 119-132Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 35.
    Ramstedt, Mats
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Alkoholkonsumtion och skador i Sverige - omfattning, mätmetoder och problem2007Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 36.
    Ramstedt, Mats
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Change and stability? Trends in alcohol consumption, harms and policy: Sweden 1990-20102010In: Nordic studies on alcohol and drugs, Vol. 27, no 5, p. 409-423Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 37.
    Ramstedt, Mats
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Commentary on Kerr et al. (2011): Good or bad news - and for whom?2011In: Addiction, ISSN 0965-2140, E-ISSN 1360-0443, Vol. 106, no 2, p. 323-323Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 38.
    Ramstedt, Mats
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Comparative studies on alcohol-related problems in postwar Western Europe2001Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
  • 39.
    Ramstedt, Mats
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Consumption and liver cirrhosis mortality with and without mention of alcohol: the case of Canada2003In: Addiction, ISSN 0965-2140, E-ISSN 1360-0443, Vol. 98, no 9, p. 1267-1276Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims To analyse post-war variations in per capita alcohol consumption in relation to gender-specific liver cirrhosis mortality in Canadian provinces and to assess the extent to which alcohol bears a different relation to cirrhosis deaths with mention of alcohol (alcoholic cirrhosis) compared to cirrhosis deaths without mention of alcohol (non-alcoholic cirrhosis).

    Data and method Annual liver cirrhosis mortality rates by 5-year age groups were converted into gender-specific and age-adjusted mortality rates. Outcome measures included total cirrhosis—the conventional measure of liver cirrhosis—alcoholic cirrhosis and non-alcoholic cirrhosis. Per capita alcohol consumption was measured by alcohol sales and weighted with a 10-year distributed lag model. A graphical analysis was used to examine the regional relationship and the Box–Jenkins technique for time-series analysis was used to estimate the temporal relationship.

    Findings Geographical variations in alcohol consumption corresponded to variations in total liver cirrhosis and particularly alcoholic cirrhosis, whereas non-alcoholic cirrhosis rates were not associated geographically with alcohol consumption. In general, for all provinces, time-series analyses revealed positive and statistically significant effects of changes in alcohol consumption on cirrhosis mortality. In Canada at large, a 1-litre increase in per capita consumption was associated with a 17% increase in male total cirrhosis rates and a 13% increase in female total cirrhosis rates. Alcohol consumption had a stronger impact on alcoholic cirrhosis, which increased by fully 30% per litre increase in alcohol per capita for men and women. Although the effect on the non-alcoholic cirrhosis rate was weaker (12% for men and 7% for women) it was nevertheless statistically significant and suggests that a large proportion of these deaths may actually be alcohol-related.

    Conclusions Some well-established findings in alcohol research were confirmed by the Canadian experience: per capita alcohol consumption is related closely to death rates from liver cirrhosis and alcohol-related deaths tend to be under-reported in mortality statistics.

  • 40.
    Ramstedt, Mats
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Fluctuations in male IHD-mortality in Russia – has alcohol been involved?2009In: Drug and Alcohol Review, ISSN 0959-5236, E-ISSN 1465-3362, Vol. 28, p. 390-395Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 41.
    Ramstedt, Mats
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Har alkoholskadeutvecklingen varit annorlunda i södra Sverige?: En analys av regionala skillnader i alkoholrelaterad dödlighet under 1987-20022005In: Gränslös utmaning: alkoholpolitik i ny tid, Stockholm: Socialdepartementet/Fritzes offentliga publikationer , 2005, p. 341-354Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 42.
    Ramstedt, Mats
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Has the impact of population drinking on harm become weaker in Sweden?: An analysis of the development in alcohol consumption and alcohol-related harm in Sweden 1990-20052007In: Nordic Studies on Alcohol and Drugs, ISSN 1455-0725, Vol. 24, no 7, p. 62-73Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 43.
    Ramstedt, Mats
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    How much alcohol do you buy?: A comparison of self-reported alcohol purchases with actual sales2010In: Addiction, ISSN 0965-2140, E-ISSN 1360-0443, Vol. 105, no 4, p. 649-654Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Unrecorded alcohol has increased in the Nordic countries during recent years, above all in terms of cross-border trade. This implies that trends and levels of per capita consumption would look different without estimates of this source of alcohol, estimates that in Sweden and other countries are made through surveys. Aim The overall aim is to analyse the validity of Swedish survey estimates of alcohol bought in the cross-border trade and possibly to develop weights that can be applied to such estimates. Data and method The analysis consists of comparing self-reported purchases of spirits, wine, cider/alcopops and beer at retail monopoly (Systembolaget) during 2008 (n = 18 000) with actual sales during the same period overall and monthly. Findings Of the recorded amount of purchases at Systembolaget, 87% was reported in the survey, compared with the 40-60% usually found for self-reported consumption. Significant differences across beverages were revealed, showing a lower coverage rate for beer and spirits and a higher coverage rate for wine and cider. Changes in purchases of all beverages were captured fairly well, at least changes taking place from one month to another. Conclusions Self-reported alcohol purchases achieve a higher coverage rate than found typically in studies based on self-reported use of alcohol. If adjustments are to be made to correct for underreporting in self-reported data on alcohol purchases, different weights should be applied to different beverages. Furthermore, at least major changes in how much alcohol is purchased in the population can be monitored using well-designed population surveys.

  • 44.
    Ramstedt, Mats
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Hur mycket dricker vi? Om svårigheter att mäta svenskarnas alkoholkonsumtion2010In: Konsumtionsrapporten 2010, Göteborg: Göteborgs universitet , 2010, p. 28-31Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 45.
    Ramstedt, Mats
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Kan slutenvårdstatistik användas som indikator på förändrade alkoholskador i Sverige och i så fall hur?: en analys av utvecklingen åren 1987-20032005In: Nordisk Alkohol- og narkotikatidsskrift (NAT), ISSN 1455-0725, E-ISSN 1458-6126, Vol. 22, p. 339-349Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 46.
    Ramstedt, Mats
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Liver cirrhosis mortality in 15 European countries1999In: Nordisk Alkohol- og narkotikatidsskrift (NAT), ISSN 1455-0725, E-ISSN 1458-6126, Vol. 16, no suppl., p. 55-73Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 47.
    Ramstedt, Mats
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Per capita alcohol consumption and liver cirrhosis mortality in 14 European countries2001In: Addiction, ISSN 0965-2140, E-ISSN 1360-0443, Vol. 96, no Supplement 1, p. 19-33Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim. To estimate the effects of changes in per capita alcohol consumption on liver cirrhosis mortality rates in various demographic groups across 14 western European countries. Method. Yearly changes in gender- and age-specific mortality rates from 1950 to 1995 were analysed in relation to corresponding yearly changes in per capita alcohol consumption, employing the Box-Jenkins technique for time series analysis. Country-specific estimates were pooled into three regions: northern, central and southern Europe. Measurements. Cirrhosis mortality data for 5-year age groups were converted into gender-specific mortality rates in the age groups 15 +, 15-44, 45-64 and 65 + and expressed as the number of deaths per 100 000 inhabitants. Alcohol sales were used to measure aggregate consumption, which were calculated into consumption (litres 100% alcohol) per year per inhabitant over 14 years of age and weighted with a 10-year distributed lag model. Findings. The country-specific analyses demonstrated a positive and statistically significant effect of changes in per capita consumption on changes in cirrhosis mortality in 13 countries for males and in nine countries for females. The strongest alcohol effect was found in northern Europe, due mainly to a large effect in Sweden. Moreover, when different age groups were analysed significant estimates were obtained in 29 of 42 cases for males and in 20 of 42 cases for females. Most of the non-significant estimates were found in older age groups. Conclusions. The results suggest clearly that a change in the overall level of drinking as a general rule affect cirrhosis mortality in different drinking cultures as well as among different demographic groups. Moreover, the findings correspond with what is expected from the collectivity theory of drinking cultures.

  • 48.
    Ramstedt, Mats
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Population drinking and homicide in Australia: A time series analysis of the period 1950-20032011In: Drug and Alcohol Review, ISSN 0959-5236, E-ISSN 1465-3362, Vol. 30, no 5, p. 466-472Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background. Despite a significant amount of research on alcohol and homicide in Australia, as yet there has been no study of the association at the aggregate level to reveal where Australia fits in with respect to the cultural differences found in the international research of this association. Aims. To analyse the temporal association between population drinking and homicide in Australia and to put the results in an international comparative perspective. Method. Using Autoregressive Integrated Moving Average (ARIMA) time series analysis, overall and gender-specific homicide rates from 1950 to 2003 were analysed in relation to alcohol consumption overall as well as to different beverages. Findings. A one-litre increase in per capita consumption was followed by an 8% increase in overall and male homicide rates and a 6% increase in female homicide rates. The effect was mainly driven by beer consumption. In a comparative perspective, the importance of population drinking was similar to what has been found inWestern Europe. Conclusions. Australia belongs to the group of countries where lowering population drinking is likely to be associated with lower homicide rates and reducing beer consumption seems to be the most efficient way to achieve this. [Ramstedt M. Population drinking and homicide in Australia: A time series analysis of the period 1950-2003.

  • 49.
    Ramstedt, Mats
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Population drinking and liver cirrhosis mortality: is there a link in eastern Europe?2007In: Addiction, ISSN 0965-2140, Vol. 102, no 8, p. 1212-1223Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 50.
    Ramstedt, Mats
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Recension: Sulkunen, P., Sutton, C., Tigerstedt, C. & Warpenius, K. (eds.) Broken Spirits: Power and Ideas in Nordic Alcohol Control2001In: Sociologisk forskning, ISSN 0038-0342, E-ISSN 2002-066X, Vol. 38, no 1, p. 146-150Article, book review (Other academic)
12 1 - 50 of 77
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