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  • 1.
    Bodin, Helena
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Culture and Aesthetics.
    Seclusion versus Accessibility: The Harems of Constantinople as Aesthetic Worlds in Stories by Elsa Lindberg-Dovlette2018In: World Literatures: Exploring the Cosmopolitan-Vernacular Exchange / [ed] Stefan Helgesson, Annika Mörte Alling, Yvonne Lindqvist and Helena Wulff, Stockholm: Stockholm University Press, 2018, p. 246-260Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This chapter examines the strategies according to which the Swedish author Elsa Lindberg-Dovlette’s stories, set in Ottoman harems of Constantinople in the early twentieth century, create a distinctive aesthetic world (Hayot, 2012). It is demonstrated that this world is constructed out of the limited and distorted views from behind the veil. By means of their aesthetic “worldedness”, Lindberg-Dovlette’s stories make the secluded milieus of women in the harems of cosmopolitan Constantinople – their special limited view and reduced mobility – accessible to western readers in their vernacular languages, not only in Swedish, but also in translation into Finnish, German, French and Dutch.

  • 2.
    Cripps, Rebecca
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    The Persistence of Gender-Based Stereotypes in the Language of Harry Potter and the Philosopher’s Stone and Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire2016Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Harry Potter-series are widely popular fantasy-novels that have influenced young readers all over the world on various issues, one being gender. Many arguments have been proposed to explain how the Harry Potter-series has a gender-biased attitude. Although previous research has covered a wide variety of claims, this essay will focus on examining the language and word choices made to describe the male and female characters of Harry Potter and the Philosopher’s Stone and Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire. The word choices consist of both traditionally masculine adjectives and verbs as well as adjectives and verbs with negative connotations. To obtain a comprehensive view of the gender-biased tone of the two novels, the essay will not only examine the language, but also investigate if there is a gender-biased way of portraying the characters based on how their behaviour is described. These observations will be combined with previous research which includes Sara Mills’ investigation of sexist language and indirect sexism, Heilman and Donaldson’s critical perspective on the Harry Potter-novels, and Turner-Bowker’s study of stereotyping in young readers’ literature. These studies support my arguments and show that that there is a gender-bias in the way the characters are described, both through language and in the way that the character’s act in Harry Potter and the Philosopher’s Stone and Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire.  

  • 3.
    Ekelund, Bo G.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Worldly vernaculars in the Anglophone Caribbean2018In: World Literatures: Exploring the Cosmopolitan-Vernacular Exchange / [ed] Stefan Helgesson, Annika Mörte Alling, Yvonne Lindqvist, Stockholm: Stockholm University Press, 2018, p. 150-161Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Returning to the canonical opposition between Derek Walcott and Kamau Brathwaite as an illustration, this essay argues that the rendering of place is an indispensable category for studying the tensions between cosmopolitan and vernacular orientations, as instanced in the work of these poets. More particularly, different strategies are associated with distinct forms of claiming place, and vice versa. Both Walcott and Brathwaite can be seen as affirming the local – “the smaller place” – at the expense of the “larger world”, but they do so by means of their access to the distant places their poems register. The essay ends up holding up a full matrix engendering a rich set of possibilities: the smaller place may be claimed with cosmopolitan means or in the vernacular; the larger world may be invested with cosmopolitan expressivity or with vernacular forms.

  • 4.
    Erman, Britt
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Lewis, Margareta
    There is nothing like native speech: A comparison of native and very advanced non-native speech2015In: From clerks to corpora: essays on the English language yesterday and today / [ed] Philip Shaw, Britt Erman, Gunnel Melchers, Peter Sundkvist, Stockholm: Stockholm University Press, 2015, p. 349-366Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 5.
    Helgesson, Stefan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    General Introduction: The Cosmopolitan and Vernacular in Interaction2018In: World Literatures: Exploring the Cosmopolitan-Vernacular Exchange / [ed] Stefan Helgesson, Annika Mörte Alling, Yvonne Lindqvist, Helena Wulff, Stockholm: Stockholm University Press, 2018, p. 1-11Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 6.
    Helgesson, Stefan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Literary World-Making Under Apartheid: Staffrider and the Location of Print Culture2018In: World Literatures: Exploring the Cosmopolitan-Vernacular Exchange / [ed] Stefan Helgesson, Annika Mörte Alling, Yvonne Lindqvist, Helena Wulff, Stockholm: Stockholm University Press, 2018, p. 171-184Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    With the March 1979 issue of the South African literary journal Staffrider as its empirical case, this chapter demonstrates how the journal can be read as a world-making enterprise. Based in an Arendtian understanding of world-making as a collective and public human undertaking that is intended to persist through time, the analysis focuses on how Staffrider’s cultivatation of literary value harnessed formal, linguistic and canonical resources of a wider literary world for local and politically radical ends. Hence, properly accounting for its significance in the history of South African literature requires that we move beyond its immediate location and moment, and adopt a broader and deeper analytical framework that recognises the relative autonomony of literature as an aspect of its world-making capacity. In its generality, this may seem like a harmless claim, but its interest lies in how such a harnessing of resources is done – and also how this may adjust or even challenge the received South African understanding of Staffrider’s importance.

  • 7.
    Helgesson, Stefan
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Mörte Alling, AnnikaLindqvist, YvonneStockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Institute for Interpreting and Translation Studies.Wulff, HelenaStockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    World Literatures: Exploring the Cosmopolitan-Vernacular Exchange2018Collection (editor) (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Placing itself within the burgeoning field of world literary studies, the organising principle of this book is that of an open-ended dynamic, namely the cosmopolitan-vernacular exchange.

    As an adaptable comparative fulcrum for literary studies, the notion of the cosmopolitan-vernacular exchange accommodates also highly localised literatures. In this way, it redresses what has repeatedly been identified as a weakness of the world literature paradigm, namely the one-sided focus on literature that accumulates global prestige or makes it on the Euro-American book market.

    How has the vernacular been defined historically? How is it inflected by gender? How are the poles of the vernacular and the cosmopolitan distributed spatially or stylistically in literary narratives? How are cosmopolitan domains of literature incorporated in local literary communities? What are the effects of translation on the encoding of vernacular and cosmopolitan values?

    Ranging across a dozen languages and literature from five continents, these are some of the questions that the contributions attempt to address.

  • 8.
    Kuteeva, Maria
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    "Mythonomer": Tolkien on myth in his scholarly work2015In: From clerks to corpora: essays on the English language yesterday and today: essays in honour of Nils-Lennart Johannesson / [ed] Philip Shaw, Britt Erman, Gunnel Melchers, Peter Sundkvist, Stockholm: Stockholm University Press, 2015, p. 215-228Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 9.
    Lindqvist, Yvonne
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Institute for Interpreting and Translation Studies.
    Introduction to Part 42018In: World Literatures: Exploring the Cosmopolitan and Vernacular Exchange / [ed] Stefan Helgesson, Annika Mörte Alling, Yvonne Lindqvist, Helena Wulff, Stockholm: Stockholm University Press, 2018, p. 289-294Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 10.
    Lindqvist, Yvonne
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Institute for Interpreting and Translation Studies.
    Translation Bibliomigrancy: The Case of Contemporary Caribbean Literature in Scandinavia2018In: World Literatures: Exploring the Cosmopolitan and Vernacular Exchange / [ed] Stefan Helgesson, Annika Mörte Alling, Yvonne Lindqvist, Helena Wulff, Stockholm: Stockholm University Press, 2018, p. 295-309Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The chapter “Translation Bibliomigrancy” presents the theoretical framework for the study of the meeting of Caribbean and Scandinavian literature by means of translation. Bibliomigrancy, i.e. the dynamics of cosmopolitanising and vernacularising translation processes in world literatures, is a central concept in the study as well as The Double Consecration Hypothesis, according to which this literature needs to be consecrated primarily within respective dominant literary centre(s), and secondly within the Anglo-American literary culture before agents in Scandinavia consider a translation into the Scandinavian languages. Contending that translation is a form of literary consecration the study traces translations from the Caribbean French, English and Spanish languages to the Scandinavian Swedish, Danish and Norwegian languages during the period 1990–2010. Given the construction of the studied literary consecration cultures (mono-, duo- or pluri-centric), bibliomigrancy to the Scandinavian periphery will evince differentiated characteristics. The chapter discusses how cosmopolitanising and vernacularising translation dynamics influence bibliomigrancy and the hypothesised double consecration in the Scandinavian context.

  • 11.
    Ljunggren, Anna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Slavic and Baltic Studies, Finnish, Dutch, and German.
    The Contemporary Russian Cosmopolitans2018In: World Literatures: Exploring the Cosmopolitan-Vernacular Exchange / [ed] Stefan Helgesson, Annika Mörte-Alling, Yvonne Lindqvist, Helena Wulff, Stockholm: Stockholm University Press, 2018, p. 211-228Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The article examines Russian transcultural writing through an analysis of selected works by Vladimir Nabokov, Joseph Brodsky, Mikhail Shishkin and Andrei Makine. It is argued that contemporary Russian cosmopolitanism should be related to the East/West dichotomy, as defining Russian cultural history. Arguably, the cultural choices made by writers in exile until today have been influenced by their gravitation to one of these poles. The article discusses the poetics of transcultural writing and deals with questions such as its genres of preference, the organization of time and space, and translingualism.

  • 12.
    Ljungholm, Jonas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    African American Education and Progression in Raplh Ellison's Invisible Man2016Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

                                      Abstract

    Literary portraits of African Americans’ struggles in the United States for a more equal society have provided valuable insights into the pain and hardship they had to endure for a large portion of the United States’ existence. Ralph Ellison’s famous novel Invisible Man is one of those novels and is the primary source for this study. In this novel the unnamed African American protagonist tries to find a place of his own within a segregated society and has to succumb to the white man’s will to be part of American society. Despite the segregation and subjugation, the protagonist believes that he can progress in American society through education, but his development is constantly thwarted because of his skin colour. Ellison utilizes features from the bildungsroman to highlight how differently education works for African Americans and white people, since the traditional progression of the bildungsroman is not possible for the protagonist despite his trying to follow its traditional pattern. The thwarted progression instead seems to move the plot into another type of progression, namely a spiritual progression. I will therefore conclude that education in Invisible Man creates segregation and subjugation and that the protagonist’s progression is subverted into a spiritual progression. How the protagonist’s journey can be subverted is related to how power structures and discourses influence people’s actions and beliefs. I will use Michel Foucault’s Discipline and Punish and The Archaeology of Knowledge to explain how power structures and discourses enable segregation, subjugation and a spiritual progression. Furthermore, the result will reveal that, because of surrounding power structures and discourses, the protagonist cannot do anything in this American society other than conform to prevailing power structures or hide himself until he knows how to battle these structures.

    Keywords: Education; Segregation; Bildungsroman; Michel Foucault; African American.

  • 13.
    Moreno, Victor
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Native American Identity, Locality, and Memory in N. Scott Momaday’s Poetry2017Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor of Fine Arts), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    In this thesis I examine the poetic constructions of cultural identity in the work of N.

    Scott Momaday, while I seek to show how locality and identity invigorate the poet’s

    work in its emphasis on heritage and history. In Momaday’s poetry there is an attempt

    to give shelter to and register Native American history, traditions, and cultural identity,

    which also indicates an attitude of artistic resistance to external political and historical

    pressures on Native American culture such as colonialism. In this thesis I discuss the

    way in which Momaday’s poetic use of locality functions in relation to questions of

    belonging and identity, both communal and individual. In this discussion of locality and

    identity, I also show how the poet uses abstractions interrelated to locality and identity

    such as memory, oral tradition, and history to further explore the cultural identity and

    community in the Native American context. I will argue that the link between identity,

    locality, memory and history provides the poet a tool for creating a space for his artistic

    resistance. Ultimately, I will show how even though previous criticism mostly focused

    on Momaday’s fiction, an analysis of his poetry gives additional insight into the poet’s

    constructions of cultural identity and his use of the Native American heritage.

  • 14.
    Rasmussen, Irina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Documentary Modernism: Worldly Sympathies, Ideal Collectivities and Dissenting Individualism2018In: World Literatures: Exploring the Cosmopolitan-Vernacular Exchange / [ed] Stefan Helgesson, Annika Mörte Alling, Yvonne Lindqvist, Helena Wulff, Stockholm: Stockholm University Press, 2018, p. 185-198Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This chapter approaches the nexus of cosmopolitanism and nationalism as it is actualised in a range of aesthetic documentary projects from the 1920s and 30s. It argues that a range of varied documentary modernist projects implement cosmopolitan practices of collection, assemblage and reportage in order to remap the world in formations conductive to universal social justice. It shows, firstly, how the modernist production of cosmopolitan value in aestheticized documentary cultural forms energises the sociopolitical imaginary of the period and, secondly, how aesthetic modernisms’ response to the cosmopolitics of the interwar period anticipates contemporary debates in the early 21st century about globalisation and world literature.

  • 15.
    Schwartz, Cecilia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Romance Studies and Classics.
    Profiles of Italy: Localising practices of Swedish Publishing Houses2018In: World literatures: Exploring the cosmopolitan-vernacular exchange / [ed] Stefan Helgesson, Annika Mörte Alling, Yvonne Lindqvist, Helena Wulff, Stockholm: Stockholm University Press, 2018, p. 310-323Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Is it possible to pinpoint the status of a foreign literature in a receiving culture? In this chapter, I will briefly suggest a methodo- logical path that can be followed in order to find out more about attitudes towards translated literature, by focusing on the selec- tion of titles and the packaging of books. Why is selection and packaging crucial to the understanding of transnational literary relations?

  • 16.
    Shaw, Philip
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    The development of attitudes to foreign languages as shown in the English novel2015In: From Clerks to Corpora: essays on the English language yesterday and today: essays in honour of Nils-Lennart Johannesson / [ed] Philip Shaw, Britt Erman, Gunnel Melchers, Peter Sundkvist, Stockholm: Stockholm University Press, 2015, p. 193-214Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 17.
    Shaw, Philip
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Erman, BrittStockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.Melchers, GunnelStockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.Peter, SundkvistStockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    From clerks to corpora: essays on the English language yesterday and today2015Collection (editor) (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Why is the Isle of Dogs in the Thames called Isle of Dogs? Did King Canute’s men bring English usage back to Jutland? How can we find out where English speakers suck their breath in to give a short response? And what did the Brontës do about dialect and think about foreign languages? The answers are in this collection of empirical work on English past and present in honour of Nils-Lennart Johannesson, Professor of English Language at Stockholm University. The first five chapters report individual studies forming an overview of current issues in the study of Old and Middle English phonology, lexis and syntax. The next six look at Early Modern and Modern English from a historical point of view, using data from corpora, manuscript archives, and fiction. Two more look at the Old English scholar JRR Tolkien and his work. The remaining chapters discuss aspects of Modern English. Several use corpora to look at English usage in itself or in relation to Swedish, French, or Norwegian. The last three look at grammatical models, the pragmatics of second language use, and modern English semantics.

  • 18.
    Sundkvist, Peter
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Using the World Wide Web to research spoken varieties of English: The case of pulmonic ingressive speech2015In: From clerks to corpora: essays on the English language yesterday and today: essays in honour of Nils-Lennart Johannesson / [ed] Philip Shaw, Britt Erman, Gunnel Melchers, Peter Sundkvist, Stockholm: Stockholm University Press, 2015, p. 303-321Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 19.
    Ursini, Francesco-Alessio
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Another look at preposition stranding2015In: From clerks to corpora: essays on the English language yesterday and today: essays in honour of Nils-Lennart Johannesson / [ed] Philip Shaw, Britt Erman, Gunnel Melchers, Peter Sundkvist, Stockholm: Stockholm University Press, 2015, p. 319-343Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 20.
    Wulff, Helena
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Introduction to Part 22018In: World Literatures: Exloring the Cosmopolitan-Vernacular Exchange / [ed] Stefan Helgesson, Annika Mörte Alling, Yvonne Lindqvist, Helena Wulff, Stockholm: Stockholm University Press, 2018, p. 103-106Chapter in book (Other academic)
1 - 20 of 20
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