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  • 1.
    Ahlgren, Hans
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    On the origin of the mountain hare on the island of Gotland: By means of ancient DNA analysis2011Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 30 credits / 45 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The island of Gotland houses a number of terrestrial mammalian species even though it was covered with ice during the last glacial period. The purpose of this study is to genetically analyse the mountain hare (Lepus timidus) to deduce its origin and genetic structure during different time periods, and also to discuss how it reached the island. A 130 base pair sequence of mitochondrial DNA from 38 prehistoric hares was analysed and compared to modern hares from different locations in Europe. The result shows a discrepancy among the samples creating two populations with different origin.

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  • 2.
    Ahlgren, Hans
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies.
    Prehistoric human impact on wild mammalian populations in Scandinavia2021Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis aims to study the interactions of pre-agricultural societies in Scandinavia with wild mammals, for example in terms of hunting and translocation. More specifically, the aim is to investigate the possibility of identifying examples of overexploitation, targeted hunting or translocation of wild mammals in prehistoric Scandinavia, and to discuss the implications this could have had for both the wild animals and the humans. The thesis also studies translocation to evaluate the feasibility of using it as a proxy for prehistoric human mobility, and to understand the motivation for this action. 

    Although the focus is on the animals in this thesis, the ultimate purpose is to study humans and their interactions with animals in prehistory. The thesis applies genetic analyses to zooarchaeological material of various mammalian species from different Scandinavian sites, in order to study whether the genetic structures have changed in these species over time, and to assess whether these changes were induced by different human actions. The species studied in this thesis were selected on the basis of the importance they are considered to have had for prehistoric people.

    The dissertation comprises five studies. The first study investigates the occurrence of mountain hares on the island of Gotland, and discusses how they got there and where they came from. The second study explores the temporal genetic structure of the grey seal in the Baltic Sea, and discusses whether humans and/or climate were the drivers for the sudden disappearance of grey seals from the island of Stora Karlsö. The third study concerns a shift where moose apparently became less important as prey in northern Sweden at the end of the Neolithic period, and discusses whether humans targeted female moose in hunting. The fourth study analyses and discusses the history of the harp seal in the Baltic Sea. The fifth study is a methodological paper which involves identifying seals according to sex, using the dog genome.

    The overall result of the different case studies shows that there were major population fluctuations over time in all the species studied, and that in some cases, humans are likely to have contributed to this, e.g. through overhunting and translocation. The study also shows that the population fluctuations often occurred in connection with certain climatic events, though it was not possible to separate climatic effects from human impact in terms of the cause.

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    Prehistoric human impact on wild mammalian populations in Scandinavia
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  • 3.
    Ahlgren, Hans
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Bro-Jørgensen, Maiken Hemme
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory. University of Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Glykou, Aikaterini
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Schmölcke, Ulrich
    Angerbjorn, Anders
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Zoology.
    Olsen, Morten Tange
    Lidén, Kerstin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    The Baltic grey seal: A 9000-year history of presence and absence2022In: The Holocene, ISSN 0959-6836, E-ISSN 1477-0911, Vol. 32, no 6, p. 569-577Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The grey seal (Halichoerus grypus) has been part of the Baltic Sea fauna for more than 9000 years and has ever since been subjected to extensive human hunting, particularly during the early phases of its presence in the Baltic Sea, but also in the early 20th century. In order to study their temporal genetic structure and to investigate whether there has been a genetically continuous grey seal population in the Baltic, we generated mitochondrial control region data from skeletal remains from ancient grey seals from the archaeological sites Stora Förvar (Sweden) and Neustadt (Germany) and compared these with modern grey seal data. We found that the majority of the Mesolithic grey seals represent haplotypes that is not found in contemporary grey seals, indicating that the Baltic Sea population went extinct, likely due to human overexploitation and environmental change. We hypothesize that grey seals recolonised the Baltic Sea from the North Sea. during the Bronze Age or Iron Age, and that the contemporary Baltic grey seal population is direct descendants of this recolonisation. Our study highlights the power of biomolecular archaeology to understand the factors that shape contemporary marine diversity. 

  • 4.
    Ahlgren, Hans
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies.
    Bro-Jørgensen, Maiken Hemme
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies.
    Larsson, Thomas B.
    Storå, Jan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies.
    Angerbjörn, Anders
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Zoology.
    Lidén, Kerstin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies.
    The decline of a Stone Age moose population in northern SwedenManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 5.
    Ahlin Sundman, Elin
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Osteoarchaeological Research Laboratory.
    Kjellström, Anna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Osteoarchaeological Research Laboratory.
    Signs of sinusitis in times of urbanization in Viking Age-early Medieval Sweden2013In: Journal of Archaeological Science, ISSN 0305-4403, E-ISSN 1095-9238, Vol. 40, no 12, p. 4457-4465Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The influence and possible negative impact on sinus health of living conditions in rural and urban environments in Viking Age (AD 800–1050) and Early Medieval Sweden (AD 1050–1200) is investigated. Skeletal samples from 32 rural settlements in the Mälaren Valley (AD 750–1200) and burials in the nearby proto-urban port of trade Birka (AD 750–960) are examined. Based on the diagnostic criteria for maxillary sinusitis used in earlier studies, the results show that there is no significant difference in the prevalence of signs of sinusitis between the two materials (i.e. the Mälaren Valley versus Birka). Consequently, this provides no evidence that living in a proto-urban environment had a negative impact on sinus health. However, when compared with previously studied samples from the early medieval town Sigtuna, dated to AD 970–1100, the populations of the Mälaren Valley and Birka show significantly lower frequencies of bone changes interpreted as chronic maxillary sinusitis (95%, 70% and 82% respectively). This implies that the urban environment of Sigtuna could have led to impaired sinus health. There is also a significant difference between males and females in the Birka material, in which more females (100%) than males (68%) were affected. A gender based differentiation in work tasks is suggested by this, or exposure to environmental risk factors that affect sinus health. No difference between males and females could be detected in the samples from the Mälaren Valley and Sigtuna.

  • 6.
    Ahlström, Christian
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities.
    Spår av hav, yxa och penna: historiska sjöolyckor i Östersjön avspeglade i marinarkeologiskt källmaterial1995Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
  • 7.
    Ahlström, Torbjörn
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Osteology Unit.
    Landmark morphometrics and osteology1994Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
  • 8.
    Al Razzaz, Salim
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Soil Analysis for samples from the hill-fort of Hedeby2015Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [sv]

    Hedeby Hochburg, borgen i Hedeby, har fått förhållandevis lite uppmärksamhet, jämfört med själva samhället i Hedeby. Utgrävningen från 2012 har dock väckt ett intresse, med ett antal frågor som behöver besvaras. I denna uppsats analyseras jordprover som samlats under utgrävningen, för att se om de kan visa något om den kronologiska relationen mellan borgvallen och gravarna i borgen. Tre metoder användes, FTIR (Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy), röntgendiffraktion (XRD) och röntgenfluorescens (XRF). Resultaten från XRF och XRD visar på en rumslig relation mellan minst en av vallens konstruktionsfaser och nedsänkningen i ett lager innanför vallen. Relationen med gravarna är inte tydlig än, och analysen gav inga kronologiska ledtrådar. Resultatet kan användas som hypotes för vidare prövning i framti

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    Soil Analysis_Hedeby_AlRazzaz
  • 9.
    Alberti, Benjamin
    et al.
    Framingham State University, USA.
    Back Danielsson, Ing-Marie
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Ethnology, History of Religions and Gender Studies, Gender Studies.
    Gender, Feminist, and Queer Archaeologies: USA Perspective2014In: Encyclopedia of Global Archaeology / [ed] Claire Smith, New York: Springer-Verlag New York, 2014, p. 2988-2997Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This entry presents a brief history of the emergence of feminism, gender, and queer in North American archaeology, which, along with the United Kingdom and Scandinavia to a lesser degree, represents the geographic origin and center of such work. The key concepts as used by archaeologists are defined; the relationship among them is explored and shown to be both problematic and productive. The place of feminism, gender, and queer within North American archaeology today is characterized and, finally, likely avenues of future research are suggested. The greatest impact of feminist, gender, and queer archaeologies has been on the authority of positivist approaches, the objectivity of interpretation, equity issues within the profession, collaborative knowledge making, and the understanding of key archaeological interpretive concepts.

  • 10.
    Alrawi, Loey
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    DNA Analysis on a Viking-age boat grave from Sala hytta Västmanland, grave A22017Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Viking-age boat grave burials are a less common but still repeatedly used way to bury the dead during the late Iron Age. Boat burials are exceptional in many aspects, not only due to placing the individual in a boat with numerous burial gifts including animals, but also by burying the individual without prior cremation, a common practice during the Iron Age. The aim of this thesis is to genetically analyse inhumation boat graves and compare the genetic composition of the ancient individuals with modern populations through population genetic analyses. This will highlight these particular human remains in a mobility context. A total of 11 individuals was analysed, but only one yielded enough DNA for further statistical analyses. This one individual proved genetically exceptionally well preserved. The results clearly show that the individual (a female) has a genetic affinity to populations in northern Europe. However, the results do not discriminate between modern Baltic/Scandinavian populations, depending on the statistical test.

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  • 11.
    Alrawi, Loey
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Förekomsten av den genetiska varianten laktapersistens hos neolitiska grupper från Öland: The contribution of the genetic variant Lactase persistence among Neolithic people from the Baltic island Öland in Sweden2014Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This study deals with the contribution of the genetic variant lactase persistence among Neolithic people from the Baltic Island Öland. Skeletal remains from twelve individuals went through DNA sequencing in order to find the mutation that allows adult individuals to digest milk sugar. The twelve individuals were chosen from two different Neolithic sites, where the archaeological and isotopic data suggest that the individuals from Köpingsvik were hunters and gatherers and the individuals from Resmo were early farmers. The individuals with the genetic variant lactase persistence can be described with selection and genetic flow.  Only five individuals produced results and the mutation was found in two of the subjects. All the individuals who were successfully sequenced came from Resmo, whereasno individuals from Köpingsvik yielded any results.  

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  • 12. Altınışık, N. Ezgi
    et al.
    Kazancı, Duygu Deniz
    Aydoğan, Ayça
    Gemici, Hasan Can
    Erdal, Ömür Dilek
    Sarıaltun, Savaş
    Vural, Kıvılcım Başak
    Koptekin, Dilek
    Gürün, Kanat
    Sağlıcan, Ekin
    Fernandes, Daniel
    Çakan, Gökhan
    Koruyucu, Meliha Melis
    Kempe Lagerholm, Vendela
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies. Centre for Palaeogenetics, Sweden.
    Karamurat, Cansu
    Özkan, Mustafa
    Kılınç, Gülşah Merve
    Sevkar, Arda
    Sürer, Elif
    Götherström, Anders
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies. Centre for Palaeogenetics, Sweden.
    Atakuman, Çiğdem
    Erdal, Yılmaz Selim
    Özer, Füsun
    Özdoğan, Aslı Erim
    Somel, Mehmet
    A genomic snapshot of demographic and cultural dynamism in Upper Mesopotamia during the Neolithic Transition2022In: Science Advances, E-ISSN 2375-2548, Vol. 8, no 44, article id eabo3609Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Upper Mesopotamia played a key role in the Neolithic Transition in Southwest Asia through marked innovations in symbolism, technology, and diet. We present 13 ancient genomes (c. 8500 to 7500 cal BCE) from Pre-Pottery Neolithic Çayönü in the Tigris basin together with bioarchaeological and material culture data. Our findings reveal that Çayönü was a genetically diverse population, carrying mixed ancestry from western and eastern Fertile Crescent, and that the community received immigrants. Our results further suggest that the community was organized along biological family lines. We document bodily interventions such as head shaping and cauterization among the individuals examined, reflecting Çayönü’s cultural ingenuity. Last, we identify Upper Mesopotamia as the likely source of eastern gene flow into Neolithic Anatolia, in line with material culture evidence. We hypothesize that Upper Mesopotamia’s cultural dynamism during the Neolithic Transition was the product not only of its fertile lands but also of its interregional demographic connections. 

  • 13.
    Andersson, Christoffer
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Runsa - A hilltop settlement during the Migration Period: Distinguishing spatiality and organization through analyzing chemical imprints of daily activities2012Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 30 credits / 45 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Archaeologists have long noted the striking monumentality and large-scale efforts behind the Iron Age hilltop settlements. Yet, because of limited excavations, they represent a controversial part of the Migration Period society and much of their function remains hidden. This paper deals with questions concerning the inner organization and activities that took place within the Iron Age hilltop settlement at Runsa. The study is linked to the ongoing project ”Runsa fornborg –En befast centralplats i ostra Malardalen under folkvandringstid” which aims to investigate the socio-political functions of Runsa. In an attempt to establish a nuanced picture and distinguish space use within the hilltop settlement, a multi-variable approach is used. Alongside more traditional methods, element analysis by atomic absorption spectrophotometer (AAS) and lipid analysis by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) is emphasized.

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  • 14.
    Andersson, Edla
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    Bronsålderns våtmarksoffer i Uppland: Om lokaler med deponerade djur- och människoben - en korologisk analys2021Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper I will research whether or not bone depositions in water from the bronze age have a common feature in purpose of identifying undiscovered depositions. I will study six different places in Uppland, Sweden and go through the amount and the different types of ancient monuments adjacent to the depositions to try to find a pattern. With the knowledge I gather I will discuss how the results can help archeologists to identify new potential deposition locations. The result of this paper was that the studied locations were too few to find a real pattern to identify new depositions. I’m hopeful with a larger study done on a wider geographical area with more locations that a pattern will be identified.

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  • 15. Andersson, Hans
    et al.
    Widgren, MatsStockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Human Geography.
    Kan man leva på en ödegård? Huvudgårdar, landbotorp och odlingssystem under medeltid i Lägerbobygden, Östergötland2016Collection (editor) (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Is it possible to survive on a deserted farm: Manors, tenants and farming systems during the Middle Ages in the Lägerbo area, Östergötland. 

    This study approaches the late medieval farm desertion from a landscape perspective. It focuses on the area of a former medieval estate in southern Östergötland, Sweden. Based on a retrogressive analysis of cadastral maps and historical records the medieval settlement is reconstructed. In this process three formerly unknown deserted farms were identified, with abandoned field systems and building remains.  The volume provides the archaeological documentation of field systems and settlements at these sites. These data provide the background for investigating the shifting social and ecological circumstances that once made it possible for tenant families to survive on these farms. During the height of the manorial system the small farms were specialised units in a redistributive system. In the late 14th century the estate and all tenant farms were donated to the convents of Vadstena and Vreta.  Rents were no longer paid in labour but in butter.  In the fifteenth century several farms were abandoned and turned into meadows under the surviving farms. The new tenurial relations prevented the recolonization of the farms. The study is the result of an interdisciplinary project involving medieval archaeology, historical geography, palynology and medieval history.

  • 16.
    Andersson, Helena
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies.
    Gotländska stenåldersstudier: Människor och djur, platser och landskap2016Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis deals mainly with the Middle Neolithic period (ca. 3200-2300 BC) on the island of Gotland in the Baltic Sea. The aim is to deepen the understanding of how the islanders related to their surroundings, to the landscape, to places, to objects, to animals and to humans, both living and dead. The archaeological material is studied downwards and up with a focus on practices, especially the handling and deposition of materials and objects in graves, within sites and in the landscape. The study is comparative and the Middle Neolithic is described in relation to the Early Neolithic and the Mesolithic period on the island.

    From a long term perspective the island is presented as a region where strong continuity can be identified, regarding both way of life and economy. In contrast, substantial changes did occur through time regarding the islander’s conceptions of the world and of social relations. This in turn affected the way they looked upon the landscape, different sites and animals, as well as other human beings. During the Mesolithic, the islanders first saw it as possible to create their world, their micro-cosmos, wherever they were, and they saw themselves as living in symbiosis with seals. With time, though, they started to relate, to connect and to identify themselves with the island, its landscape and its material, with axe sites and a growing group identity as results. The growing group identity culminated during the Early Neolithic with a dualistic conception of the world and with ritualised depositions in border zones.

    The Middle Neolithic is presented as a period when earlier boundaries were dissolved. This concerned, for example, boundaries towards the world around the islanders and they were no longer keeping themselves to their own sphere. At the same time individuals became socially important. It became accepted and also vital to give expression to personal identity, which was done through objects, materials and animals. Despite this, group identity continued to be an important part in their lives. This is most evident through the specific Pitted Ware sites, where the dead were also treated and buried. These places were sites for ritual and social practices, situated in visible, central and easy accessible locations, like gates in and out of the islands’ different areas. The dead were very important for the islanders. In the beginning of MN B they started to adopt aspects from the Battle Axe culture, but they never embraced Battle Axe grave customs. Instead they held on to the Pitted Ware way of dealing with the dead and buried, and to the Pitted Ware sites, through the whole period, with large burial grounds as a result.

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    Gotländska stenåldersstudier
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  • 17.
    Andersson, Karin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies.
    Diet och identitet: Analyser av kol- kväve- och svavelisotoper på indivier från det kristna senvikingatida gravfältet i Björned, Torsåkers socken, Ångermanland2006Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This paper deals with the late Viking age/early medieval grave field in Björned, Torsåker parish, Ångermanland County in northern Sweden. The grave field in Björned is rare because it has all the signs of being Christianized before the surroundings. This awakes questions such as if the people of Björned came from another place and brought the religion with them or if someone else did that for them. To find these answers I have analysed the stable isotope ratios [delta]13C, [delta]15N and [delta]34S in human bone collagen. Through these stable isotopes we can not only see what the people consumed but also where their food had its origin. It seems like several people from the grave field had a different origin then the rest.

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  • 18.
    Andersson, Kenneth
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    Myntbruk i det medeltida Falsterbo: En topografisk studie2020Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
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  • 19. Andersson, Lars
    et al.
    Källström, Magnus
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Scandinavian Languages.
    Spåren av Jarlabanke2008In: Hem till Jarlabanke: Jord, makt och evigt liv i östra Mälardalen under järnålder och medeltid, Historiska media, Lund , 2008, p. 360-378Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 20.
    Androshchuk, Fedir
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies. Allmänt arkeologi.
    Källström, Anna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies. Osteologi.
    Se byst vtoryj Iev:: bolezn' knjazja Vladimira Vasilkovicha i ejo biblejskie paralleli2007In: Ruthenica, Vol. 6, p. 243-258Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    "On Biblical and real parallels of Prince Vladimir Vasilkovich’s disease".

    Artikeln handlar om den volynske fursten Vladimir Vasilkovich († 1289). Utifrån en noggrann analys av fornryska skriftliga källor som detaljerat beskriver hans sjukdom konkluderas att Vladimir hade lepra. En leprasjuk ledare som ovanligt socialt och kulturellt fenomen i det medeltida samhället är alltså ledmotivet i artikeln

  • 21.
    Andrén, Anders
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies. arkeologi.
    A petrified patchwork: The rune-stone at Karlevi and the early history of Öland2007In: On the Road: Studies in Honour of Lars Larsson, Almqvist & Wiksell International, Stockholm , 2007, p. 295-300Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A re-interpretation of the famous rune-stone at Karlevi on Öland, from about AD 1000. Instead of being viewed as a "casual monument", the rune-stone is regarded as part of the local political history of the island. Above all the Danish connections are underlined.

  • 22.
    Andrén, Anders
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies.
    A world of stone: Warrior culture, hybridity, and old Nores cosmology2011In: Old Norse religion in long-term perspectives: Origins, changes, and interactions / [ed] Anders Andrén; Kristina Jennbert; Catharina Raudvere, Lund: Nordic Academic Press, 2011, 2, p. 33-38Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The article is a cosmological interpretation of the Iron Age ringfort at Ismantorp on the island of Öland

  • 23.
    Andrén, Anders
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    Archaeology2020In: The Pre-Christian religions of the North. History and Structures: Basic Premises and Consideration of Sources / [ed] Jens Peter Schjødt, John Lindow, Anders Andrén, Turnhout: Brepols, 2020, p. 135-160Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Overview of archaeological sources for the study of Old Norse religion

  • 24.
    Andrén, Anders
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    Archaeology of a densely documented time2009In: Zwischen Tradition und Wandel: Archäologie des 15. und 16. Jahrhunderts / [ed] Barbara Scholkmann, Sören Frommer, Christina Vossler, Markus Wolf, Büchenbach: Faustus , 2009, p. 3-6Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Survey of the specific problems in the archaeology of late medieval and early modern Europe

  • 25.
    Andrén, Anders
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    Arkeologi2015In: Forskningens framtid!: ämnesöversikt 2014: humaniora och samhällsvetenskap, Stockholm: Vetenskapsrådet , 2015, p. bil. 1-5Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    En kritisk översikt över svensk arkeologi under de senaste 30 åren

  • 26.
    Andrén, Anders
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies.
    Behind Heathendom: Archaeological Studies of Old Norse Religion2007In: Scottish Archaeological Journal, ISSN 0305 8980, Vol. 27, no 2, p. 105-138Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper offers a synthesis of a large body of research into the "Old Norse religion" which has been conducted as part of a multidisciplinary research projekt - Vägar till Midgård - Roads to Midgard. Evidence for Pre-Christian Norse religion is drawn from Medieval Icelandic literature, place-names and the archaeology of ritual sites. The movement from open-air sites to purpose built ritual houses and finally churches is outlined. The prolonged contact with the Mediterranean world during the Roman Iron Age exerted a strong influence on Old Norse religion and some of the most distinctively Scandinavian religious features can be seen to be hybrid cultural constructs.

  • 27.
    Andrén, Anders
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    Bengt Thordeman (1893-1990)2020In: Svenska arkeologer / [ed] Anne-Sofie Gräslund, Uppsala: Kungliga Gustav Adolfs Akademien, 2020, p. 247-254Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Kort biografi av Bengt Thordeman (1893-1990)

  • 28.
    Andrén, Anders
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies.
    Betydelsen av främmande unga män2011In: Förmodern globalitet: Essäer om rörelse, möten och fjärran ting under 10000 år / [ed] Anders Andrén, Lund: Nordic Academic Press, 2011, p. 131-143Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Artikel är en global översikt över legosoldaters kulturella betydelse

  • 29.
    Andrén, Anders
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    Borgare såväl i staden som på landsbygden? Relationen mellan Visby och Gotland cirka 1250-13752020In: Land og by på tværs: 1000-1800: festskrift til Bjørn Poulsen i anledning af 65-årsdagen / [ed] Mikkel Leth Jespersen, Mikkel Thelle, Aarhus: Aarhus Universitetsforlag, 2020, p. 203-215Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    A study of the relationship between Visby and Gotland circa 1250-1375

  • 30.
    Andrén, Anders
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    Carl Georg Brunius (1792-1869)2020In: Svenska arkeologer / [ed] Anne-Sofie Gräslund, Uppsala: Kungliga Gustav Adolfs Akademien, 2020, p. 29-34Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Kort biografi av Carl Georg Brunius (1792-1869)

  • 31.
    Andrén, Anders
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    Dalby bortom Heligkorskyrkan: Ett kejserligt landskap i Skåne2012In: Locus Celebris: Dalby kyrka, kloster och gård / [ed] Stephan Borgehammar, Jes Wienberg, Göteborg: Makadam Förlag, 2012, p. 351-359Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    En analys av Dalby klosters omgivningar under medeltiden

  • 32.
    Andrén, Anders
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    Dalby bortom Heligkorskyrkan: Ett kejserligt landskap i Skåne2012In: Lunds historia - staden och omlandet: 1. Medeltiden - en metropol växer fram / [ed] Peter Carelli, Lund: Lunds kommun , 2012, p. 204-207Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 33.
    Andrén, Anders
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    De stora berättelsernas återkomst2009In: Arkeologisk framtid: Arkeologmötet 2008 / [ed] Tore Artelius, Anna Källén, Stockholm: Svenska arkeologiska samfundet , 2009, p. 69-77Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    A survey of the discussion on narrative forms in archaeology

  • 34.
    Andrén, Anders
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    Det medeltida Gotland: En arkeologisk guidebok2017 (ed. 2)Book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 35.
    Andrén, Anders
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    Det osyrade brödet mellan kärlek och hat2020In: Eros, philia, agape: Kärlekens kulturhistoria: en vänbok till Inga Sanner / [ed] John Björkman, Victoria Fareld, Anna Källén, Lund: Ellerströms förlag, 2020, p. 165-180Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    En fallstudie av några judeförföljelser i det medeltida Europa

  • 36.
    Andrén, Anders
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    Divine Twins2020In: The pre-Christian Religions of the North. History and Structures: Conceptual Frameworks. The Cosmos and the Collective Supernational Beings / [ed] Jens Peter Schjødt, John Lindow, Anders Andrén, Turnhout: Brepols, 2020, p. 1453-1463Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    An overview of traces of divine twins in Old Norse religion

  • 37.
    Andrén, Anders
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    En fråga om tid2015In: Kungl. Vitterhets historie och antikvitets akademiens årsbok, Stockholm: Kungl. Vitterhets Historie och Antikvitets Akademien, 2015, p. 177-186Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 38.
    Andrén, Anders
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    En realiserad utopi2013In: Renässansstaden i Vattenriket: Kristianstad 400 år / [ed] Ingemar Ottosson, Kristianstad: Kristianstads kommun , 2013, p. 31-35Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Översikt över stadsplaneidéer bakom grundläggningen av Kristianstad 1614

  • 39.
    Andrén, Anders
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    En tolkning av det historiska landskapet runt Dalby kyrka och kloster2015In: Kyrkan i landskapet / [ed] Ulf Sporrong, Stockholm: Kungliga Vitterhets Historie och Antikvitets Akademien , 2015, p. 99-111Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 40.
    Andrén, Anders
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies.
    Ett omöjligt uppdrag?: Att arkeologiskt studera nordisk förkristen religion2007In: Aktuellt om historia: Organ för Historielärarnas Förening, ISSN 0348-503X, Vol. 1, p. 77-89Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [sv]

    A short overview of the archaeological possiblities to study Old Norse religion

  • 41.
    Andrén, Anders
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies.
    From Iceland to Gotland and Back Again: The Historical Context of a Fornaldarsaga2011In: Times, Things and Places: 36 Essays for Jussi-Pekka Taavitsainen / [ed] Janne Harjula; Maija Helemaa; Janne Haarala, Turku and Raisio: Newprint Oy , 2011, p. 72-79Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The article is an attempt to date an Icelandic fornaldarsaga about ancient Gotland. Although the saga is set in prehistory it was probably composed in the early 15th century.

  • 42.
    Andrén, Anders
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    From Sunset to Sunset: An Interpretation of the Early Gotlandic Picture Stones2012In: Gotland´s Picture Stones: Bearers of an Enigmatic Legacy / [ed] Maria Herlin Karnell, Visby: Fornsalens förlag, Gotlands museum , 2012, p. 49-58Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    An iconographic interpretation of the early picture stones on Gotland

  • 43.
    Andrén, Anders
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    Från solnedgång till solnedgång: En tolkning av de tidiga gotländska bildstenarna2012In: Gotlands bildstenar: järnålderns gåtfulla budbärare / [ed] Maria Herlin Karnell ; svenska översättningar: Bertil Sjöblom, Visby: Fornsalens förlag, Gotlands museum , 2012, Vol. 84, p. 49-58Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    En ikonografisk tolkning av de tidiga gotländska bildstenarna

  • 44.
    Andrén, Anders
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies.
    Förmodern globalitet?2011In: Förmodern globalitet: Essäer om rörelse, möten och fjärran ting under 10000 år / [ed] Anders Andrén, Lund: Nordic Academic Press, 2011, p. 9-24Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Artikeln är en forskningsöversikt över global historia och global arkeologi

  • 45.
    Andrén, Anders
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    Historical and Social Contexts2020In: The Pre-Christian Religions of the North. History and Structures: Social, Geographical, and Historical Contexts, and Communication between Worlds / [ed] Jens Peter Schjødt, John Lindow, Anders Andrén, Turnhout: Brepols, 2020, p. 391-443Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Overview of the historical and social background of Old Norse religion

  • 46.
    Andrén, Anders
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    Kommentarer2021In: Gutasagan: En gotländsk krönika / [ed] Cathrin Emdén, Visby: Gotlands Museum, Fornsalens förlag , 2021, p. 21-79Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [sv]

    Kommentarer till Gutasagan

  • 47.
    Andrén, Anders
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    Landscape and settlement as utopian space2016In: Medieval Archaeology: Volume 1: Defining Medieval Archaeology / [ed] Roberta Gilchrist, Gemma L. Watson, Routledge, 2016, p. 236-253Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    An interpretation of the mental and ideological perspectives of landscape and settlement in medieval Svandinavia.

  • 48.
    Andrén, Anders
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies. arkeologi (allmän).
    Lies about Gotland2008In: Factes of Archaeology: Essays in Honour of Lotte Hedeager on her 60th Birthday, Oslo Academic Press, Oslo , 2008, p. 47-55Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The article is focussed on a discussion of the contested issue of social structure on Gotland during the Viking Age. The startingpoint of this discussion is the so far never used medieval Icelandic short story callad "Star-Oddi’s dream", which deals with events on Gotland set in a distant past.

  • 49.
    Andrén, Anders
    Stockholm University.
    Mats P. Malmer2008In: Kungliga Vitterhets Historie och Antikvitetsakademien Årsbok, ISSN 0083-6796, Vol. 208, p. 25-42Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Orbituary of Mats P. Malmer (1921-2007), former professor of Archaeology at Stockholm University.

  • 50.
    Andrén, Anders
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    Mats P. Malmer (1921-2007)2020In: Svenska arkeologer / [ed] Anne-Sofie Gräslund, Uppsala: Kungliga Gustav Adolfs Akademien, 2020, p. 435-442Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Kort biografi om Mats P. Malmer (1921-2007)

1234567 1 - 50 of 1799
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