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  • 1. Abram, Simone
    et al.
    Bianco, B. Feldman
    Khosravi, Shahram
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Salazar, N.
    de Genova, N.
    The free movement of people around the world would be Utopian: IUAES World Congress 20132017In: Identities: Global Studies in Culture and Power, ISSN 1070-289X, E-ISSN 1547-3384, Vol. 24, no 2, p. 123-155Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article contains the text and discussion of a debate held at the IUAES World Congress in Anthropology at Manchester University in 2013. The motion was proposed by Bela Feldman-Bianco (State University of Campinas), seconded by Noel Salazar (University of Leuven) and was opposed by Shahram Khosravi (Stockholm University), seconded by Nicholas de Genova (then at Goldsmiths' College). The debate was chaired by Simone Abram (Durham University).

  • 2.
    Dahl, Gudrun
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Bartholdson, Örjan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Favero, Paolo
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Khosravi, Shahram
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Modernities on the Move2012Book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Tehran, Delhi, Salvador

    The present volume emanates from three studies of youngsters and young adults in three urban contexts in the world: in Tehran in Iran, Delhi in India, and Salvador in Brazil. To them, global as well as local ideas about modernization, traditionalism and authenticity provide frames for interpreting the development of society and evaluating one’s own life.

    The young people that this volume is concerned with were all born in the 1980s. Today they are adults. They all relate to a globalized market of recognition, but also one of potential resources such as attractive commodities, international jobs, local jobs with an international touch, or international support for local activities through the NGO world. Their rod of reference for judging their own life is global. Their sense of time and progress is related to the important developments of their own countries - internally and in relation to the global context - during their own lifespan and possibly that of their parents. Yet, cultural identity is in all the three cases also marked by a relation to ideas about tradition. Becoming modern may also entail redescribing, reinventing and reviving pasts in which the parents’ generation saw little value. The volume as a whole endeavours to give a contribution to the ethnography of varying cultural conceptualisations of modernity.

  • 3.
    Khosravi, Shahram
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    A FRAGMENTED DIASPORA: Iranians in Sweden2018In: Nordic Journal of Migration Research, ISSN 1799-649X, E-ISSN 1799-649X, Vol. 8, no 2, p. 73-81Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The notion of diaspora generally indicates achievements: creating a home outside the homeland, entrepreneurship, the establishment of local and global networks, new organisations, media and spatial as well as social mobility. In studies of Iranian diaspora, a rosy picture of 'super successful' Iranians has often obscured other aspects of the diaspora - failure, conflicts, internal exclusion and fragmentation of the group along various lines, such as ideologies, class, gender, local identification and cause of migration. Through ethnographic vignettes of the Iranian migrants in Sweden, this article demonstrates the segmentation, hybridity and complexity of the experiences of the diaspora. Avoiding the language of generalisation and by focussing instead on particular histories and individual circumstances, it reveals the diversity, disintegration and contradictions within what has been assumed to be a homogeneous and static diaspora.

  • 4.
    Khosravi, Shahram
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    An Ethnography of Migrant ‘Illegality’ in Sweden: Included yet Excepted?2010In: Journal of International Political Theory, ISSN 1755-0882, Vol. 6, no 1, p. 95-116Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article examines how migrant ‘illegality’ is experienced in the Swedish context. How do ‘illegal’ migrants manage work, housing, healthcare, safety and a family life in the absence of access to formal provisions? What are their survival strategies? I use direct quotations from undocumented migrants themselves to build a multifaceted picture of migrant ‘illegality’. Following Willen's (2007) call for a ‘critical phenomenology of illegality’, I move beyond the socio-political situation of undocumented migrants to their embodied experiences of being ‘illegal’. I conclude that undocumented migrants are not excluded but are excepted; they have not been thrown out, but neither are they considered participants. Undocumented migrants are included in society without being recognised as members.

  • 5.
    Khosravi, Shahram
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Café2012In: Om femtio år med Arkitekturmuseet / [ed] Malin Zimm, Stockholm: Arkitekturmuseet , 2012Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 6.
    Khosravi, Shahram
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Can a Khan be an Anthropologist?1996In: Antropologiska studier, ISSN 0345-0902, no 54-55Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 7.
    Khosravi, Shahram
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Diaspora-ye irani: (Iranian Diaspora)2004In: Anthropology / [ed] Soheila Shahshahani, Tehran: Agah Publishers , 2004Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 8.
    Khosravi, Shahram
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Disappearing bookstores2012Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 9.
    Khosravi, Shahram
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Displaced Masculinity: Gender and Ethnicity among Iranian men in Sweden2009In: Iranian Studies : journal of the Society for Iranian studies, ISSN 0021-0862, Vol. 42, no 4, p. 591-609Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Masculinity, like other kinds of social identity, is an ongoing construction in a dialogue between one's self-image and others' perceptions of one. The interplay between ethnicity and masculinity is a main theme in this article. Due to geographical displacement, the Iranian man's masculine identity has been challenged and renegotiated on the one hand by Iranian women's struggle for emancipation and on the other hand by the Swedish mediawork. Iranian men are displaced from the position of having a powerful gaze, which fixed and controlled women into a position of being an object of the gaze of others. The dominant gaze in Sweden makes them (in)visible in the same way their gaze makes women (in)visible in Iran.

  • 10.
    Khosravi, Shahram
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Displacement and Entrepreneurship: Iranian small businesses in Stockholm1999In: Journal of ethnic and migration studies, ISSN 1369-183X, E-ISSN 1469-9451, Vol. 25, no 3, p. 493-508Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Increasing unemployment in Sweden has affected non‐Western residents particularly hard. A shrinking public sector, and toughening attitudes toward migrant job‐seekers within the private sector, frequently leave self‐employment as the only option. The emergence of an ethnic economy is partly due to the opportunity structure in the host society, and partly to available ethnic resources. This article examines Iranian small businesses in Stockholm. The Swedish labour market, and the situation of Iranian migrants within it, are crucial factors in. bringing about the Iranian entry into self‐employment. Yet, ethnic resources and previous work experiences in Iran also play an important role in shaping economic activities among Iranians in Sweden. This article portrays how Iranians, whose social space has been distorted by displacement, contrive to reconstruct this in the Swedish setting.

  • 11.
    Khosravi, Shahram
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    ‘Farhang-e Mosafer’ (Travelling Culture)  : Examples of cultural Exchange between Iran and other Civilizations2004In: Anthropology ArticlesArticle in journal (Other academic)
  • 12.
    Khosravi, Shahram
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Graffiti in Tehran2013In: Anthropology Now, ISSN 1949-2901, Vol. 5, no 1, p. 1-17Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 13.
    Khosravi, Shahram
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Manlighet i exil: genus och etnicitet bland iranska män i Sverige2006In: Orienten i Sverige: samtida möten och gränser / [ed] Simon Ekström, Lena Gerholm, Lund: Studentlitteratur, 2006Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 14.
    Khosravi, Shahram
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Myth and meaning2012Other (Other academic)
  • 15.
    Khosravi, Shahram
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Nomad (1991) av Louis Beck1995In: Kelk, no 60Article, book review (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 16.
    Khosravi, Shahram
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Precarious lives: waiting and hope in Iran2017Book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In Precarious Lives, Shahram Khosravi attempts to reconcile the paradoxes of Iranians' everyday life in the first decade of the twenty-first century. On the one hand, multiple circumstances of precarity give rise to a sense of hopelessness, shared visions of a futureless tomorrow, widespread home(land)lessness, intense individualism, and a growth of incivilities. On the other, daydreaming and hope, as well as civility and solidarity in political protests, street carnivals, and social movements, continue to persist. Young Iranians describe themselves as being stuck in purposelessness and forced to endure endless waiting, and they are also aware that they are perceived as unproductive and a burden on their society. Despite the aspirations and inspiration they possess, they find themselves forced into petrifying social and spatial immobility. Uncertainty in the present, a seemingly futureless tomorrow: these are the circumstances that Khosravi explores in Precarious Lives.

    Creating an intricate and moving portrait of contemporary Iranian life, Khosravi weaves together individual stories, government reports, statistics, and cultural analysis of art and literature to depict how Iranians react to the experience of precarity and the possibility of hope. Drawing on extensive ethnographic engagement with youth in Tehran and Isfahan as well as with migrant workers in rural areas, Khosravi examines the complexities and contradictions of everyday life in Iran. Precarious Lives is a vital work of contemporary anthropology that serves as a testament to the shared hardship and hope of the Iranian people.

  • 17.
    Khosravi, Shahram
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Stolen time2018In: Radical philosophy, ISSN 0300-211X, no 203, p. 38-41Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 18.
    Khosravi, Shahram
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Sweden: detention and deportation of asylum seekers2009In: RACE & CLASS, ISSN 0306-3968, E-ISSN 1741-3125, Vol. 50, no 4, p. 38-56Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Based on ethnographic fieldwork among undocumented migrants (including asylum seekers) in Stockholm between 2004 and 2006, additional interviews with police officers, deportation escorts and staff at Swedish detention centres and some fieldwork in Tehran in June 2005 and August 2007, this article examines the impact of Sweden's more restrictive asylum policy since the beginning of the decade. From a condition of 'deportability' to incarceration in detention centres and then removal from Sweden, asylum seekers have been increasingly criminalised - their confinement and removal being seen as mechanisms for preserving national security. Focusing, in particular, on the techniques used by the detention apparatus to 'humanise' and 'rationalise' the confinement and expulsion of asylum seekers, it is argued that a discourse of 'caring' and 'saving' works, in effect, as a disciplinary mechanism that presents asylum seekers as responsible for their own detention and deportation.

  • 19.
    Khosravi, Shahram
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Territorialiserad mänsklighet: irreguljära immigranter och det nakna livet2006In: Om välfärdens gränser och det villkorade medborgarskapet: rapport / av Utredningen om makt, integration och strukturell diskriminering / [ed] Paulina de los Reyes, Stockholm: Fritzes, 2006, p. 283-310Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 20.
    Khosravi, Shahram
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology. Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    The ‘Illegal’ Traveler: an auto-ethnography of borders2007In: Social Anthropology, Vol. 15, no 3Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 21.
    Khosravi, Shahram
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    The ‘Illegal’ Traveller: An auto-ethnography of borders2010Book (Other academic)
  • 22.
    Khosravi, Shahram
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    The Persian Escort2013Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 23.
    Khosravi, Shahram
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    The Precarious Status of Working-Class Men in Iran2017In: Current history (1941), ISSN 0011-3530, E-ISSN 1944-785X, Vol. 116, no 794, p. 355-359Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The sociopolitical transition can be observed best in the shift of the symbolic position of working-class men: from veneration in the first decade after the revolution to condemnation three decades later.

  • 24.
    Khosravi, Shahram
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    The Third Generation: The Islamic Order of Things and Cultural Defiance among theYoung of Tehran2003Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
  • 25.
    Khosravi, Shahram
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    White Masks/Muslim Names: Name Changes among Muslim Immigrants in Sweden2012In: RACE & CLASS, ISSN 0306-3968, E-ISSN 1741-3125, Vol. 53, no 3, p. 65-80Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Names carry strong ethnic and religious connotations and reveal an individual's affiliation to a specific group. When a religious or ethnic group is stigmatised, the relationship between names and social stigma becomes explicit. For Muslims, names and veils are the two most conspicuous signifiers of their stigmatised identity. Some believe that covering their Muslim identity with Swedish-sounding or 'neutral' European names will facilitate their individual integration into society. Based on empirical findings, examining application forms for name-changing and interviews with name-changers, this article offers an exploratory analysis of the reasons, expectations and effects of surname-changing among immigrants with Muslim names. It examines the extent to which the changes reflect the impact of social disadvantage and anti-Muslim sentiment in Sweden.

  • 26.
    Khosravi, Shahram
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    www.iranian.com:an Ethnographic Approach to An Online Diaspora2000In: ISIM Newsletter, Vol. 6, no 1, p. 13-13Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    While exile refers to a glamorous return to the 'real' homeland, diaspora creates an alternative homeland, an imagined one. Exile denies 'here' and mourns for 'there'. Diaspora lessens the unbearable nostalgia by constructing a community based on the networks which link the dispersed. Exile emphasizes a centralized relationship with the spatial homeland. In diaspora, through the romantization of the 'promised land', emphasis is placed on a cobweb of relations amongst the scattered. Diaspora suggests deterritorialization, which does not mean geographical displacement - as it is for exile - but refers to the collapse of a fixed link between identity, culture, existence and a single place. In other words, diaspora is a deterritorialized World Wide Web.

  • 27.
    Khosravi, Shahram
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Young and Defiant in Tehran2008Book (Refereed)
  • 28.
    Khosravi, Shahram
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Research in International Migration and Ethnic Relations (CEIFO).
    Graham, Mark
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Home is Where You Make It: Repatriation and Diaspora Culture among Iranians in Sweden1997In: The Journal of Refugee Studies, ISSN 0951-6328, E-ISSN 1471-6925, Vol. 10, no 2, p. 115-133Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article examines attitudes toward returning to Iran among Iranian refugees in Sweden. Differences between Iranians are traced to various factors including economic position and political involvement The idea of a home and a homeland, as well as that of a home culture, are critically examined in the light of the creation of a diaspora culture in Sweden and elsewhere that seeks to reconstruct aspects of Iranian culture. It is argued that not only the ‘when’ of return migration must be examined, but also the ‘where’, in a situation of dynamic cultural change which redefines the meaning of the home culture and the location of home itself

  • 29.
    Khosravi, Shahram
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Graham, Mark
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Reordering Public and Private in Iranian Cyberspace: Identity, Politics and Mobilization’2010In: Identities: Global Studies in Culture and Power, ISSN 1070-289X, E-ISSN 1547-3384, Vol. 9, no 2, p. 219-246Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The capacity of cyberspace to bypass some of the spatial divisions that underpin social inequality endows it with political significance. This article examines some of the ways in which cyberspace has contributed to redrawing the boundaries between public and private and some of the consequences of this for people, things, and ideas in Iran and the Iranian diaspora. It shows how cyberspace influences a wide range of political phenomena including political mobilization and censorship, intergenerational communication, identity formation, sexuality, sense of belonging, and forms and location of symbolic capital. The relationship between net users in the diaspora and cyberspace involves a circuit of reorderings of one's understanding of the diaspora, one's contact with it in cyberspace, of one's own ideas on the basis of what one finds there, and of social relationships established and maintained in cyberspace. Paradoxically, the very richness and diversity of the ideas and opinions found in Iranian cyberspace may undermine the idea of there actually being a single Iranian diaspora.

  • 30.
    Khosravi, Sharam
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Farhang-e Mosafer’: (TravellingCulture)2004In: Anthropology ArticlesArticle in journal (Other academic)
  • 31.
    Khosravi, Sharam
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Round trip to Ithaca2011In: Exiled Ink Magazine, ISSN 1744-1498, no 14, p. 30-31Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
1 - 31 of 31
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