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  • 1.
    Jennische, Ulrik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology, Stockholm Centre for Organizational Research (SCORE).
    Navigating conflicting moral temporalities: gradual growth, state sovereignty and small-scale trade in urban Ghana2024In: Journal for Contemporary African Studies, ISSN 0258-9001, E-ISSN 1469-9397Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article delves into the moral economy that informs small-scale trade in urban Ghana's growing markets, and that intersects with development, the state, and the global economy. Small-small, emphasizes slow, gradual, dependable progress and inclusiveness. While (re)distributing profit and possibilities, small-small is also used to discredit competitors and is felt to inhibit personal growth. It furthermore often conflicts with neoliberal norms of self-governing and self-optimization. Drawing from fieldwork in Tamale, the study explores how morality intertwines with market dynamics, the nation-state, and politics of informality. Moral economy illuminates the temporal tensions between individual and collective gains against the backdrop of local economic practices and global capitalism. It underscores the moral underpinnings of protectionism and sovereignty amid neoliberal shifts, revealing complex interactions shaping economic life in urban Ghana.

  • 2.
    Svärdsten Nymans, Fredrik
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Business School.
    Tamm Hallström, Kristina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Business School. Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology, Stockholm Centre for Organizational Research (SCORE).
    Audit credibility and LGBTQI rights: certification operation in the margins2024In: Accounting, Auditing & Accountability Journal, ISSN 0951-3574, Vol. 37, no 9, p. 53-74Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The aim of this paper is to contribute to the knowledge about the diversity of credibility arrangements in new audit spaces “in the margins” of auditing and the implications of such arrangements.

    Method: The paper is based on an in-depth qualitative study of the LGBTQI certification run by the Swedish Federation for Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, Queer and Intersex Rights (RFSL) during its first decade of business. We have interviewed employees and studied documents at the certification units within the RFSL. We have also interviewed certified organizations. 

    Findings: We highlight two features that explain the unusual credibility arrangements in this audit practice: the role of beneficiaries in the organizational arrangements chosen and the role of responsibility as an organizing value with consequences for responsibility allocation of this certification. These features make it possible for the RFSL to act as a credible auditor even though it deviates from common arrangements for credible audit.  

    Originality/value: The RFSL certification is different in several ways. First, the RFSL acts as both trainer and auditor. Second, the trainers/auditors at the RFSL have no accreditation to guarantee their credibility. Third, the RFSL decides itself what standards should apply for the certification and adapts these standards to the operation being audited. Therefore, this case provides a good opportunity to study alternative credibility arrangements in the margins of auditing as well as their justifications.  

  • 3.
    Roumbanis, Lambros
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology, Stockholm Centre for Organizational Research (SCORE).
    Status hierarchies, gender bias and disrespect: Ethnographic observations from the Swedish Research Council review panel groups2024In: The Social Production of Research: Perspectives on funding and gender / [ed] Sandra Acker; Oili-Helena Ylijoki; Michelle K. McGinn, London: Society for Research into Higher Education (SRHE)/Routledge , 2024, p. 159-172Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Status as been described as an ancient form of social inequality that interpenetrates modern meritocratic institutions, including research and higher education. Status is a multifaceted social phenomenon that can affect the relations between people in many different ways. Despite political and normative changes that promote equal treatment of men and women, deep-rooted gender biases still exist as integral parts of the creation of status hierarchies in academic life. In this chapter, I illustrate this argument using a number of concrete situations from the Swedish Research Council panel groups in which some male reviewers responded with disrespect to the arguments presented by their female colleagues. The analysis is intended to shed new light on the social dramaturgy of gender-based status inequalities in the grant peer review process. It is unusual in putting the emphasis on the panellists’ detailed interactions rather than on the efforts to encourage gender equality in competition results through rule-changes and other prescriptive means. Moreover, it reveals the intersectionality of gender, age and esteem in shaping the behaviour of panellists.

  • 4. Bursell, Moa
    et al.
    Roumbanis, Lambros
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology, Stockholm Centre for Organizational Research (SCORE). Institute for Futures Studies, Sweden.
    After the algorithms: A study of meta-algorithmic judgments and diversity in the hiring process at a large multisite company2024In: Big Data and Society, E-ISSN 2053-9517, Vol. 11, no 1Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In recent years, both private and public organizations across contexts have begun implementing AI technologies in their recruitment processes. This transition is typically justified by improved efficiency as well as more objective, performance-based ranking, and inclusive selection of job candidates. However, this rapid development has also raised concerns that the use of these emerging technologies will instead increase discrimination or enhance the already existing inequality. In the present study, we first develop the concept of meta-algorithmic judgment to understand how recruiting managers may respond to automation of the hiring process. Second, we draw on this concept in the empirical assessment of the actual consequences of this type of transition by drawing on two large and unique datasets on employment records and job applications from one of Sweden's largest food retail companies. By comparing the outcomes of traditional and algorithmic job recruitment during this technological transition, we find that, contrary to the company's intentions, algorithmic recruitment decreases diversity. However, in contrast to what is often assumed, this is primarily not because the algorithms are biased, but because of what we identify as an unintended human–algorithmic interaction effect.

  • 5.
    Vähämäki, Janet
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology, Stockholm Centre for Organizational Research (SCORE).
    Alexius, Susanna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology, Stockholm Centre for Organizational Research (SCORE).
    (Un)certainty for Sale? A Historic Exposé on Sida’s Use of External Experts 1960s–2020s2024In: Forum for Development Studies, ISSN 0803-9410, E-ISSN 1891-1765, p. 1-27Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper we offer an empirically rich, longitudinal account of the role and influence of externally sourced experts by the Swedish development aid agency, Sida, from the 1960s until present times. We describe what type of expertise has been required from external experts and how the content and rituals of these contracted experts have contributed – or not – to perceptions of trust and certainty. In the paper we present three eras, all with their distinctive features on the normative rationale and forms for external expertise; 1. 1960s–ca 1995: the Quick-fix implementer era; 2. Ca 1995–ca 2005: the Collaborative turn era; and 3. Ca 2005–2020s: the Proper organization proxy era. We suggest that a mission drift has occurred in Swedish aid as concerns both the in-house expert role of aid bureaucrats and the role of procured experts. The paper concludes that all throughout, external experts have served an important function – that of making organizations in the donor role less uncertain of their decisions on which organizations should receive funding. Interestingly, however, the use of external experts has in all times given rise to additional uncertainty, which, in turn, has called for even more experts. We also find that external experts have repeatedly been criticized for ineffectiveness and consultocracy, meaning that consultants have been influential in the formulation and implementation of policies aimed at restructuring public services.

  • 6.
    Jennische, Ulrik
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology, Stockholm Centre for Organizational Research (SCORE).
    Sörbom, Adrienne
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology, Stockholm Centre for Organizational Research (SCORE).
    Governing anticipation: UNESCO making humankind futures literate2023In: Journal of Organizational Ethnography, ISSN 2046-6749, E-ISSN 2046-6757, Vol. 12, no 1, p. 105-119Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose - This paper explores practices of foresight within the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) program Futures Literacy, as a form of transnational governmentality–founded on the interests of “using the future” by “emancipating” the minds of humanity.

    Design/methodology/approach - The paper draws on ethnographic material gathered over five years within the industry of futures consultancy, including UNESCO and its network of self-recognized futurists. The material consists of written sources, participant observation in on-site and digital events and workshops, and interviews.

    Findings - Building on Foucault's (1991) concept of governmentality, which refers to the governing of governing and how subjects politically come into being, this paper critically examines the UNESCO Futures Literacy program by answering questions on ontology, deontology, technology and utopia. It shows how the underlying rationale of the Futures Literacy program departs from an ontological premise of anticipation as a fundamental capacity of biological life, constituting an ethical substance that can be worked on and self-controlled. This rationale speaks to the mandate of UNESCO, to foster peace in our minds, but also to the governing of governing at the individual level.

    Originality/value - In the intersection between the growing literature on anticipation and research concerning governmentality the paper adds ethnographically based knowledge to the field of transnational governance. Earlier ethnographic studies of UNESCO have mostly focused upon its role for cultural heritage, or more broadly neoliberal forms of governing.

  • 7.
    Sörbom, Adrienne
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology, Stockholm Centre for Organizational Research (SCORE).
    Garsten, Christina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology, Stockholm Centre for Organizational Research (SCORE).
    Discreet Diplomacy: Practices of Secrecy in Transnational Think Tanks2023In: The Cambridge Journal of Anthropology, ISSN 2047-7716, Vol. 42, no 1, p. 98-117Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article aims to expand both the analytical gaze of diplomacy studies and anthropological interests in the field of transnational think tanks, advocacy and policy advice. Drawing on ethnographic data from three such organisations, itinvestigates secrecy practices within transnational think tanks, focusing on how everyday practices undertaken in secrecy amount to discreet diplomatic efforts. In a variety of ways, secrecy is utilised as a resource in foreign relations and diplomacy, thereby aiming to leverage status and influence. Although outwardly striving for transparency, secrecy practices are thus vital in the striving of transnational think tanks to establish themselves as actors of consequence in foreign relations and diplomatic circles. It is argued that practices of secrecy are part and parcel of the power games played, in which all participants learn and master what to discuss and what not to display. These practices, however, also imply a challenge in terms of accountability and transparency.  

  • 8.
    Gustavsson, Martin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology, Stockholm Centre for Organizational Research (SCORE).
    Hur humaniora och samhällsvetenskaperna blev fattiga: Att styra genom ämnesklassificeringar och resurstilldelning2023In: Hålla huvudet kallt: om distanserat engagemang i en uppjagad tid / [ed] Li Bennich-Björkman; Sverker Gustavsson; Mats Lindberg, Göteborg: Daidalos , 2023, p. 275-329Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 9.
    Gustavsson, Martin
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology, Stockholm Centre for Organizational Research (SCORE).
    Rahnert, Katharina
    Reglering i takt med tiden: Revisionslagstiftning i ett samhällsekonomiskt perspektiv 1895–19952023In: Revision i går, i dag, i morgon / [ed] Katharina Rahnert; Peter Öhman, Stockholm: Ekerlids förlag , 2023, p. 64-95Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 10.
    Gustavsson, Martin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology, Stockholm Centre for Organizational Research (SCORE).
    Den klassbestämda smaken för göteborgskolorister och Stockholmskolorister: En jämförelse2023In: Den underbara färgen: Göteborgskolorismen i nytt ljus / [ed] Kristoffer Arvidsson, Göteborg: Göteborgs konstmuseum , 2023, p. 166-180Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 11.
    Gustavsson, Martin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology, Stockholm Centre for Organizational Research (SCORE).
    Class-Determined Taste for Gothenburg Colourists and Stockholm Colourists: A Comparison2023In: Wonderful Colour: Gothenburg Colourism in a New Light / [ed] Kristoffer Arvidsson, Göteborg: Göteborgs konstmuseum , 2023, p. 166-180Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 12.
    Arnberg, Klara
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History and International Relations.
    Gustavsson, Martin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology, Stockholm Centre for Organizational Research (SCORE). Stockholm School of Economics, Sweden; Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Tamm Hallström, Kristina
    Under the Influence of Commercial Values: Neoliberalized Business-Consumer Relations in the Swedish Certification Market, 1988-20182023In: Enterprise & society, ISSN 1467-2227, E-ISSN 1467-2235, Vol. 24, no 3, p. 647-675Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Since the 1990s, a new model for market control organized through tripartite standards regimes (TSR), has expanded globally and affected most market exchanges through standard-setting, accreditation, and certification. This article investigates business-consumer relations under this regime, with a specific focus on the functions of accreditation and certification. In our case study of Sweden, a new picture of consumer protection under late capitalism evolves. Seeing it as a form of neoliberalization, the article uncovers a transition between two regimes of control; from one built on a potential conflict between consumer and business interests, to one based on the assumption that business interests are beneficial for all parties. Although business interest was formulated as pleasing the consumer-or the customer-by both certification firms and the Swedish Accreditation Authority, in practice consumer interest as something worth protecting was made abstract in the era of the TSR.

  • 13.
    Johannesson, Livia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Centre for Organizational Research (SCORE).
    Silence and Voice in Oral Hearings: Spatial, Temporal, and Relational Conditions for Communication in Asylum and Compulsory Care Hearings2023In: Social and Legal Studies, ISSN 0964-6639, E-ISSN 1461-7390, Vol. 32, no 3, p. 399-419Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The legal right to be heard by a judge is an important human right. However, what happens if a claimant does not meet the requirements of legal communication when given the opportunity to be heard in court? In this article, I address this question by exploring how temporal, spatial, and relational conditions encourage or silence vulnerable claimants’ voices in asylum hearings and compulsory psychiatric care hearings in Swedish administrative courts. In addition, I analyze the multiple functions orality has when judges make decisions in these case types. The results provide nuance to claims in previous studies about the importance of enough time, spaces that signal solemnity, and flexibility in judges’ approaches to vulnerable claimants’ voices by demonstrating how these conditions interact with each other and generate different communicative atmospheres. Moreover, this study challenges the idea that oral hearings are necessarily beneficial for claimants as it demonstrates that under certain conditions orality can place claimants at a disadvantage and amplify their defenselessness. However, orality brings legitimacy to court proceedings even in these cases as it communicates justice to the public evaluating these procedures from a distance.

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  • 14.
    Gustafsson, Ingrid
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology, Stockholm Centre for Organizational Research (SCORE).
    Tamm Hallström, Kristina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology, Stockholm Centre for Organizational Research (SCORE). Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Business School. Handelshögskolan, Sverige.
    International standards and the dilution of responsibility2023In: Research handbook on soft law / [ed] Eliantonio; Mariolina; Emilia Korkea-aho; Ulrika Mörth, Cheltenham: Edward Elgar Publishing, 2023, p. 177-189Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This chapter sets out to do two things: to discuss international standards as a form of soft law and to demonstrate the usefulness of organization theory in doing so. International standards have received substantial scholarly attention during the last 20 years, but they have rarely been discussed as a kind of soft law, despite how well they fit the definition. Using insights from organization studies where scholars long have been theorizing about standards, we show how standards tend to dilute responsibility. Standards have a tendency to generate more organization and instead of clarifying or concentrating responsibility, it seems difficult to find anyone responsible in a world of standards. Discussing standards as an example of soft law, the framework for responsibility dilution presented in the chapter speaks to scholars also outside the realm of standard studies specifically.

  • 15.
    Lagerkvist, Johan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology, Stockholm Centre for Organizational Research (SCORE).
    The China Nudge: Naivety, Neutrality and Non-alignment in Sweden2023In: China-US Competition: Impact on Small and Middle Powers' Strategic Choices / [ed] Simona Grano; David Wei Feng Huang, Palgrave Macmillan, 2023, p. 113-131Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This chapter explains how the major authoritarian powers China and Russia have propelled Sweden to alter its more than two hundred years long policy of neutrality and non-alignment. The focus is predominantly on China and its “wolf-warrior diplomacy” in Sweden, the Swedish debate on political naivety in general and regarding China in particular. It is argued that five years of deteriorating Sino-Swedish relations nudged Sweden further toward seeking stronger ties with the European Union on China policy. Drivers of these rapid and major changes to both policy and identity were the abduction of publisher Gui Minhai by Chinese state agents in Thailand in 2015 and the ensuing diplomatic conflict with China. The Swedish public, political parties, and especially key actors in the civil service increasingly perceived China as a threat to values and security. This sequence of events led to their construction of a coalition of consensus on a new China policy. Thus, authoritarian China, together with its increasingly belligerent partner Russia, became an important contributing factor that nudged “naïve” Sweden even further away from neutrality and onto the trajectory of military non-alignment.

  • 16.
    Thedvall, Renita
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology, Stockholm Centre for Organizational Research (SCORE).
    Näslund, Lovisa
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology, Stockholm Centre for Organizational Research (SCORE).
    A Brighter Future? The Transformative Power of Models in Social Services2023In: Transforming subjectivities: studies in human malleability in contemporary times / [ed] Cecilia Hansen Löfstrand; Kerstin Jacobsson, London: Routledge, 2023Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A core tenet of social work is that clients should be helped to work on themselves so they can improve their lives and their abilities to a point where they are no longer reliant on social services for support. To make this possible, social workers have different models at their disposal. While the clients are ostensibly governed by these techniques, models of social work also shape the subjectivities of the social workers applying them. In this chapter, our focus is on the effect of these models on social workers. Our ethnographic approach allows for a more nuanced exploration of how a technology of governmentality is received by those subjected to it, in this case, the social workers. The study highlights that the effects of the same model on practices and perceptions in the same social context differ between individuals, and allows a nuanced understanding of the effects of governmentality in practice.

  • 17.
    Soneryd, Linda
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology, Stockholm Centre for Organizational Research (SCORE). Örebro universitet, Sverige.
    Bogdanova, Elena
    Organisering av social hållbarhet vid renoveringsprojekt inom allmännyttan2023In: Organisation & Samhälle, ISSN 2001-9114, E-ISSN 2002-0287Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 18.
    Hedlund, Daniel
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Johannesson, Livia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology, Stockholm Centre for Organizational Research (SCORE).
    Editorial Introduction: The Role of Language and Communication in Asylum Procedures2023In: Journal of International Migration and Integration, ISSN 1488-3473, E-ISSN 1874-6365, Vol. 24, p. 717-726Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 19.
    Sörbom, Adrienne
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology, Stockholm Centre for Organizational Research (SCORE). Södertörn University, Sweden.
    Jezierska, Katarzyna
    Social capital and polarization: The case of Polish think tanks2023In: Journal of Civil Society, ISSN 1744-8689, E-ISSN 1744-8697, Vol. 19, no 4, p. 347-365Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this article, we study polarization within civil society. While earlier research on civil society has shown that civil society organizations can be divisive, research on polarization has only paid scant attention to the role of civil society. We bring these two aspects of the literature together to develop a framework for analyzing social capital in a polarized context. The framework helps identify practices that organizations may engage in when shaping social capital and working with others: facilitating the flow of information; providing credentials for actors; influencing agents; and reinforcing identity and recognition. Importantly, while originally developed for a fundamentally positive analysis of the mechanics of social capital, this framework includes inverted practices. In our analysis, we observe a bifurcation of actions depending on what role they play in the polarization dynamic – integrating relations within the poles or separating relations between the poles. In this sense, social capital contributes to intensified polarization. Empirically, the article is based on a dataset of 30 interviews with 24 policy-oriented civil society organizations (CSOs), here termed think tanks, in Poland. 

  • 20.
    Johannesson, Livia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology, Stockholm Centre for Organizational Research (SCORE).
    The Symbolic Life of Courts: How Judicial Language, Actions, and Objects Legitimize Credibility Assessments of Asylum Appeals2023In: Journal of International Migration and Integration, ISSN 1488-3473, E-ISSN 1874-6365, Vol. 24, p. 791-809Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Asylum determinations are highly complex and difficult decisions. At the heart of this decision lies a credibility assessment of the asylum claimant’s narrative, which confronts the decision-maker with a seemingly straightforward question: do I believe this person’s story? To uphold legitimacy of this assessment, semi-legal criteria have been established internationally. However, these criteria have been criticized for relying on inaccurate and simplistic assumptions about human behavior, autobiographical memory, and communication. In light of this contestation, I ask how the legal-administrative practice of assessing credibility of asylum applications gains legitimacy in the eyes of the public, policy-makers, and legal professionals despite resting on highly disputable assumptions? To answer this question, I draw on interviews, observations, and written judgements from the Swedish administrative courts to explore how symbolic messages are tacitly conveyed through the use of judicial language, activities, and objects. The analysis suggests that cohesive, albeit tacit, messages about credibility assessments being accurate (rather than arbitrary), objective (rather than subjective), professional (rather than lay), and just (rather than unjust) are produced to both near and distant audiences. The study contributes to the literature on credibility assessments by offering a theoretical perspective that can unpack the relationship between symbolic communication in courts and perceived legitimacy for disputed practices within asylum determinations and migration control.

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  • 21.
    Maria, Grafström
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology, Stockholm Centre for Organizational Research (SCORE).
    Jonsson, Anna
    Klintman, Mikael
    Embracing the academic–practice gap: Knowledge collaboration and the role of institutional knotting2023In: Management Learning, ISSN 1350-5076, E-ISSN 1461-7307Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Collaboration between academia and practice is crucial for addressing complex societal challenges and generating new knowledge. However, bridging the perceived gap between these two domains has proven challenging due to differences in language, expectations, and time horizons. In this article, we question the usefulness of framing these differences as a gap and explores alternative approaches to fostering academic–practice collaboration. With the help of organizational institutionalism and theory on configurational boundary work, we propose the concept of “institutional knots” to temporarily ease tensions and reconcile differences between researchers and practitioners. Drawing on two case studies, we examine how temporary knotting activities can support and enable collaboration without undermining participants’ distinct expertise and professional roles. By embracing and understanding the gap from such a perspective, we argue that institutional knots provide an alternative metaphor and valuable framework for organizing and managing academic–practice collaboration. The findings contribute to the literature on how collaborations may be organized by offering a complementary understanding of the gap metaphor and providing practical insights for researchers and practitioners seeking to navigate and leverage their differences.

  • 22.
    Grafström, Maria
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology, Stockholm Centre for Organizational Research (SCORE).
    Crafting Newsworthiness at the Intersection of Business and Journalism: The Role of Context and Identity in Nascent Economic News Practice in Sweden 2023In: History of Political Economy, ISSN 0018-2702, E-ISSN 1527-1919, Vol. 55, no S1, p. 149-174Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article explores how economic information was turned into newsworthy content in Sweden during the 1960s and 1970s. Professional norms and identities of “business journalists” were during the 1960s yet to be developed, and there were concerns raised whether issues about the corporate world and the economy were suitable to turn into journalistic news content at all. Conceptualizing newsworthiness as a logic of appropriateness, the analysis focuses on the roles that professional norms and identities played in forming nascent economic news practice. The empirical findings show that there was not one way—or one place—that this newsworthiness was constructed. Instead, nascent economic news was produced in two highly separated organizational settings: one rooted in the journalistic world and one in the business world. Depending on the context, significantly different methods and ideas guided the nascent work of creating newsworthiness for economic information. 

  • 23.
    Maria, Grafström
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Centre for Organizational Research (SCORE).
    Rehnberg, Hanna Sofia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Centre for Organizational Research (SCORE).
    Newsworthiness as a Governing Principle in Public Sector Communication2022In: Media and Communication, E-ISSN 2183-2439, Vol. 10, no 1, p. 88-98Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article examines what qualifies as news when public agencies in Sweden claim to engage in media work. We unwrap and explore what happens when ideas about “newsworthiness” enter the practice of public sector communication. What becomes news, and how? What kinds of content are favored, how are stories told, and what voices are heard? The ideas of newsworthiness in a public sector context are here conceptualized as a logic of appropriateness that governs civil servants’ media work. We base our analysis on a three-year case study of a Swedish county council’s digital news channel, VGRfokus. The analysis focuses on how ideas of newsworthiness are constructed and mirrored in and through the content of VGRfokus, as well as how they are reflected and acted upon by communications professionals working at the news channel. We suggest that ideas of newsworthiness may function as a governing principle and tone down or even hide conflicts and tensions between key values of bureaucracy and market, otherwise often manifested in public sector communication.

  • 24.
    Frostenson, Magnus
    et al.
    Örebro University School of Business, Sweden; Østfold University College, Norway.
    Maria, Grafström
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Centre for Organizational Research (SCORE).
    Mediatisation and the construction of what is morally right and wrong in contemporary business2022In: Media Culture and Society, ISSN 0163-4437, E-ISSN 1460-3675, Vol. 44, no 3, p. 532-548Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The recent discussion on mediatisation prompts questions about how it arises and how social spheres are marked by it. In this article, we use business as an example of a social sphere to show that the production of normativity by and through the media is a central aspect of mediatisation. The empirical case of the article is the Deepwater Horizon disaster. Six specific techniques were used by the media to construct the case as an instance of corporate misbehaviour that met public recognition. The techniques are instrumental in forming the predicament of a modern mediatised business sphere, it is argued.

  • 25.
    Jonsson, Anna
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology, Stockholm Centre for Organizational Research (SCORE). Lund University, Sweden.
    Maria, Grafström
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology, Stockholm Centre for Organizational Research (SCORE).
    Klintman, Mikael
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Unboxing knowledge in collaboration between academia and society: A story about conceptions and epistemic uncertainty2022In: Science and Public Policy, ISSN 0302-3427, E-ISSN 1471-5430, Vol. 49, no 4, p. 583-597Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Policymakers increasingly emphasize knowledge collaboration between academia and society as important means to generate innovations and solve complex issues. However, while recent literature on such collaboration suggests that knowledge needs to be integrated and generated across disciplines and sectors, there are surprisingly few studies that define what is meant by ‘knowledge’ or focus on the process of generating knowledge. Subsequently, the aim of this paper is to unbox ‘knowledge’ in knowledge collaboration by focusing specifically on how knowledge is understood by heterogenous actors during the process of generating knowledge. We build on insights from an in-depth case study and contribute to the literature on knowledge collaboration by bringing in theory on boundary work that specifically addresses the knowledge generation process. We argue that to better meet the expectations of collaboration, there is a need for more discussions and focus on the participating stakeholders’ heterogenous epistemological as well as ontological understanding.

  • 26. Brorström, Sara
    et al.
    Maria, Grafström
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology, Stockholm Centre for Organizational Research (SCORE).
    Tamm Hallström, Kristina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology, Stockholm Centre for Organizational Research (SCORE).
    Power of the Vague: How Vision Statements Have Mobilized Change in Two Swedish Cities2022In: Administration & Society, ISSN 0095-3997, E-ISSN 1552-3039, Vol. 54, no 10, p. 2075-2100Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper investigates the role of strategic artifacts in realizing change in two Swedish cities. Drawing from qualitative studies of city development projects we illustrate how ambiguous formulations in vision statements constitute a powerful basis for legitimizing actions. As part of establishing linkages between future-oriented vision statements and concrete actions here and now, we highlight the role of materialization. We provide three examples of how the vision statements studied materialized—into organizational structures, management control systems, and communication efforts—and discuss how such materialization implies that only some parts of broad vision statements are translated into practice.

  • 27. Rehnberg, Hanna Sofia
    et al.
    Maria, Grafström
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology, Stockholm Centre for Organizational Research (SCORE).
    Kommuninformationens bedrägliga lätthet: Om coronaberättelser2022In: Organisation & Samhälle, ISSN 2001-9114, E-ISSN 2002-0287, no 1, p. 4-9Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 28.
    Alexius, Susanna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology, Stockholm Centre for Organizational Research (SCORE).
    Hybridorganisering som social innovation: En historisk fallstudie av RFSU2022In: Social innovation för hållbar utveckling / [ed] Karl Johan Bonnedahl; Annika Egan Sjölander; Malin Lindberg, Lund: Studentlitteratur AB, 2022, p. 53-66Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    I tider av gränsöverskridande utmaningar behövs djupare kunskap om organisationsformer för gränsöverskridande samverkan och social innovation. I det här kapitlet studeras hybridorganisering inom ramen för en föreningsägd koncern, som ett innovativt sätt att organisera sådan samverkan. Sedan 1933 har RFSU framgångsrikt kombinerat politisk aktivism i föreningsform, medicinsk vetenskaplig praktik på egen klinik och kommersiellt företagande i sina bolag i en och samma koncern. Sådan höggradig hybriditet kan betraktas som en social innovation i sig. I kapitlet beskrivs hur RFSU:s hybriditet har möjliggjort stora framsteg inom sexual- och familjepolitiken, både i Sverige och internationellt. 

    Genom sin speciella hybrida form har RFSU verkat för frågor relaterade till god hälsa och välbefinnande, långt innan de paketerades som ”mål 3” i Agenda 2030. För att hitta lovande vägar framåt när det gäller social innovation och hållbar utveckling behöver vi lära av historien. Inte minst behöver vi återuppliva kunskap om föregångares organisering och betydelsen av äldre organisationsformer som kan vara högaktuella än idag. 

  • 29.
    Gustavsson, Martin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology, Stockholm Centre for Organizational Research (SCORE).
    From dismantling the class society to investing in human capital: The rise and fall of the selective student finance system in Sweden 1939–19642022In: Nordic Journal of Educational History, ISSN 2001-7766, E-ISSN 2001-9076, Vol. 8, no 2, p. 187-218Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The article highlights the history of the early gift-based and selective student finance system of the social democratic welfare state in Sweden, targeting students from the working classes. This lesser-known system, introduced in 1939, preceded the present loan-financed and universal system established in 1965 designed to reach students from all classes. The arguments for launching the selective system, how this system met the objective of broadening the social recruitment of students and the arguments behind the dismantling of the system are analysed. The equalising effect of the selective system was strong, but student loans were nevertheless more compatible with an emerging idea, imported from the Chicago School, that education could be considered an (loan-financed) investment in human capital, that provides future yields rather than a right. Historical institutional theory is used to analyse the shift between two diametrically opposed models that took place within the same Social Democratic regime.

  • 30.
    Gustavsson, Martin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology, Stockholm Centre for Organizational Research (SCORE). Forskningsgruppen för utbildnings- och kultursociologi (SEC), Uppsala universitet.
    Från automatisk uppräkning till automatiska avdrag: Finansieringsmodeller för högre utbildning 1958–20212022In: Statsvetenskaplig Tidskrift, ISSN 0039-0747, Vol. 124, no 1, p. 103-124Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of the article is to examine financial models for higher education. The economic governance of universities during different time periods is an under-explored area. Three models have been tested in Sweden: “universitetsautomatiken” (1958–1976), “sektorsanslag” (1977–1992) and “grundbulten” (1993–). The models are described, compared and related to overarching savings models for central govern-ment administration. During the first financial model, which was particularly gener-ous, there were no such savings models. However, the less generous funding models implemented after the structural crisis in the mid-1970s interacted with increasingly severer saving models that makes annual deduction of appropriations: “tvåprocen-taren” (1978–1992) and “produktivitetsavdraget” (1993–). A mechanism for resource erosion has been built into the financing system since 1977 according to the main result of the study.

  • 31.
    Gustavsson, Martin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology, Stockholm Centre for Organizational Research (SCORE). Forskningsgruppen för utbildnings- och kultursociologi (SEC), Uppsala universitet.
    De l’abolition de la société de classe à l'investissement dans le capital humain: l'essor et la chute du système d’aide sociale sélective pour les étudiants en Suède (1939-1964)2022In: Histoire de l'éducation, ISSN 0221-6280, no 157, p. 221-258Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The article traces the history of the first student finance system of the Swedish Social Democratic welfare state, a selective system of grants earmarked for students from working-class backgrounds. Introduced in 1939, this lesser-known system preceded the current loan-financed system set up in 1965 to reach students from all classes. The reasons for introducing the selective system, how the system met the objective of broadening the recruitment of students from across the social spectrum and the arguments behind the dismantling of the system are analysed. The selective system had a powerful equalising effect but student loans were, however, more compatible with the emerging idea, imported from the Chicago School, that education could be considered an investment in human capital, a generator of future income (and therefore funded by a loan) rather than a right. Historical institutional theory is used to analyse the shift between two diametrically opposed models that existed within the same Social Democratic regime.

  • 32.
    Gustavsson, Martin
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology, Stockholm Centre for Organizational Research (SCORE). Forskningsgruppen för utbildnings- och kultursociologi (SEC), Uppsala universitet.
    Melldahl, Andreas
    Kollektivbiografi och korrespondensanalys2022In: Metod: guide för historiska studier / [ed] Martin Gustavsson; Yvonne Svanström, Lund: Studentlitteratur AB, 2022, 2, p. 265-297Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 33. Brunsson, Nils
    et al.
    Gustafsson Nordin, Ingrid
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology, Stockholm Centre for Organizational Research (SCORE).
    Tamm Hallström, Kristina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology, Stockholm Centre for Organizational Research (SCORE). Stockholm School of Economics, Sverige.
    ‘Un-responsible’ Organization: How More Organization Produces Less Responsibility2022In: Organization Theory, E-ISSN 2631-7877, Vol. 3, no 4, article id 26317877221131582Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    As the world becomes more and more organized, it seems ever more difficult to find anyone responsible. Why is that? We argue that the extensive external organization of organizations in contemporary society provides the key. Formal organizations are collective orders with great potential for concentrating responsibility on top managers and the organization. But when they are organized by other organizations, this potential is undermined, and responsibility becomes diluted rather than concentrated. We explain this outcome by analysing the communication of decisions as a main producer of responsibility and by defining organization as a decided order. Our analysis draws upon and contributes to research about partial organization, but it also contributes to literatures on global governance and organizational institutionalism.

  • 34.
    Metzger, Jonathan
    et al.
    Department of Urban Planning and Environment, Division of Urban and Regional Studies, KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Tamm Hallström, Kristina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Business School. Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology, Stockholm Centre for Organizational Research (SCORE).
    Doing Planning Differently: Affective Politics and Atmospheric Engineering in Experimental Deliberative Bubbles2022In: Planning Theory & Practice, ISSN 1464-9357, E-ISSN 1470-000X, Vol. 23, no 4, p. 518-535Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Procedural planning experiments often attempt to influence how planning actors think through producing physical and social environments that affect how they feel. In this paper such experiments are conceptualized as attempts at generating atmospheric “bubbles” through the engineering of affective atmospheres. Our empirical examples show that purposeful affective engineering is very difficult to achieve – and one cannot expect that their eventual outcomes can be predicted on the basis of the ambitions that underpin them. Therefore, it is crucial to remain attentive to questions concerning the variegated, distributed and often unexpected effects of such endeavors. 

  • 35. Klintman, Mikael
    et al.
    Jonsson, Anna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology, Stockholm Centre for Organizational Research (SCORE). Lund University, Sweden.
    Grafström, Maria
    Torgilsson, Petra
    Academia and society in collaborative knowledge production towards urban sustainability: several schemes—three common crossroads2022In: Environment, Development and Sustainability, ISSN 1387-585X, E-ISSN 1573-2975Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Arrangements for collaboration in knowledge production across academia, government, non-governmental organisations, and corporations have several names, such as citizen-science, community-based participatory research, engaged research and hybrid forums. The multiplicity of schemes does not lie only in the high number of names for various versions of collaborative knowledge production. Different scholars also use concepts in multiple ways, depending on their individual choices, mother disciplines, and the problem area in which collaboration occurs. At the same time, there is a lack of analytical tools that address the full range of collaborative research schemes and provide a systematic set of questions to learn about the schemes, challenges, and opportunities. Based on our review of academic journal articles highlighting collaborative research schemes, this paper aims to analyse three parameters which it is fair to say that virtually all arrangements of collaborative knowledge production ought to consider when making decisions, parameters that are often partially missed or misunderstood: (A) epistemic-procedural, (B) exclusive-inclusive and (C) aggregative-integrative. By examining the three parameters, their political theory origins, and how they connect to and challenge existing schemes of knowledge collaboration, we provide analytical tools that could facilitate processes of developing and scrutinising arrangements of collaborative research. 

  • 36.
    Jonsson, Anna
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology, Stockholm Centre for Organizational Research (SCORE).
    Brechensbauer, Axel
    Maria, Grafström
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology, Stockholm Centre for Organizational Research (SCORE).
    Communicating science through competing logics and a scienc-art lens2022In: Journal of Science Communication, E-ISSN 1824-2049, Vol. 21, no 7, article id YO1Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This essay takes a starting point in the well-known tension between the media logic and the scientific logic and the challenges when communicating science in a mediatized society. Building on the experience of engaging in research comics, both as a method for communicating science and a creative example of a meeting between science and art, we introduce a framework — a pedagogical tool — for how science communication can be understood through the two competing logics. We contribute to literature about the balancing act of being a ‘legitimate expert’ and a ‘visible scientist’, and suggest that the meeting between science and art can be understood as a lens for how to communicate science that goes beyond the deficit model.

  • 37.
    Roumbanis, Lambros
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Centre for Organizational Research (SCORE).
    Disagreement and Agonistic Chance in Peer Review2022In: Science, Technology and Human Values, ISSN 0162-2439, E-ISSN 1552-8251, Vol. 47, no 6, p. 1302-1333Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of grant peer review is to identify the most excellent and pro- mising research projects. However, sociologists of science and STS scholars have shown that peer review tends to promote solid low-risk projects at the expense of more original and innovative projects that often come with higher risk. It has also been shown that the review process is affected by significant measures of chance. Against this background, the aim of this study is to the- orize the notions of academic judgment and agonistic chance and to present and analyze situations in which expert reviewers are faced with the challenge of trying to decide which grant proposals to select when there is strong dis- agreement. The empirical analysis is based on ethnographic observations of ten panel groups at the Swedish Research Council in the areas of natural and engineering sciences. By focusing on disagreement, the study provides a more in-depth understanding of how agonistic chance creeps into the peer-review process and becomes part of the consensus that is created.

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  • 38.
    Johannesson, Livia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology, Stockholm Centre for Organizational Research (SCORE).
    Just another benefit? Administrative judges’ constructions of sameness and difference in asylum adjudications2022In: Citizenship Studies, ISSN 1362-1025, E-ISSN 1469-3593, Vol. 26, no 7, p. 910-926Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This ethnographic study examines how Swedish administrative judges apply the principle of treating like cases the same and unlike cases differently when adjudicating asylum claims. The findings suggest that judges construct asylum claims like citizens’ claims for welfare benefits and unlike protection claims made by citizens. Drawing on Hannah Arendt’s critique of the state-centric foundation of contemporary human rights framework, I demonstrate that the Swedish asylum procedure is structured according to a similar state-centric foundation. Therefore, it reinforces injustices that exist between those who belong to a political community and those who stand outside that community asking to be let in. This study contributes to previous research on asylum adjudication by shedding light on structural injustices embedded within legal practices rather than searching for explanations in extra-legal factors. The implication of this approach is that it makes visible a paradox: that judges’ commitment to procedural justice principles can perpetuate structural injustices.

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  • 39.
    Gustafsson Nordin, Ingrid
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology, Stockholm Centre for Organizational Research (SCORE).
    Narratives of internal audit: The Sisyphean work of becoming "independent"2022In: Critical Perspectives on Accounting, ISSN 1045-2354, E-ISSN 1095-9955, p. 102448-102448, article id 102448Article in journal (Refereed)
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  • 40.
    Lagerkvist, Johan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology, Stockholm Centre for Organizational Research (SCORE).
    Gravitational Pull of Authoritarian China in South Asia?2022In: Routledge Handbook of Autocratization in South Asia / [ed] Sten Widmalm, Routledge, 2022, p. 346-356Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Against the backdrop of an emerging cold war between the United States and China, this chapter analyses the role of China in processes of autocratization in South Asia. It is argued that despite the transformation to a more assertive foreign policy under president Xi Jinping, China has not actively been promoting autocratization abroad. Nevertheless, with Xi’s vision of a “community of common destiny” for mankind, China is acting more as a leader and role model for countries in the Global South. Even in the absence of “push factors” for autocratization, it is feasible that China’s developmental model may resonate with other countries’ elites and officials. As a “pull factor” China could thus contribute to domestic processes of autocratization in South Asian countries.

  • 41.
    Tamm Hallström, Kristina
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology, Stockholm Centre for Organizational Research (SCORE). Handelshögskolan i Stockholm, Sverige.
    Gustafsson Nordin, Ingrid
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology, Stockholm Centre for Organizational Research (SCORE).
    Gustavsson, Martin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology, Stockholm Centre for Organizational Research (SCORE).
    Från rationalisering till hyperrationalisering: Kännetecken, konsekvenser och möjliga motståndsstrategier2022In: Organisation & Samhälle, ISSN 2001-9114, E-ISSN 2002-0287, ISSN 2001-9114, no 2, p. 36-41Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 42.
    Soneryd, Linda
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology, Stockholm Centre for Organizational Research (SCORE).
    Sundqvist, Göran
    Leaks and overflows: Two contrasting cases of hybrid participation in environmental governance2022In: Democratic Situations / [ed] Andreas Birkbak; Irina Papazu, Mattering Press , 2022, p. 101-117Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 43. Berkowitz, Héloïse
    et al.
    Brunsson, Nils
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology, Stockholm Centre for Organizational Research (SCORE). Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Grothe-Hammer, Michael
    Sundberg, Mikaela
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology. Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology, Stockholm Centre for Organizational Research (SCORE).
    Valiorgue, Bertrand
    Meta-Organizations: A Clarification and a Way Forward2022In: M@n@gement, E-ISSN 1286-4692, Vol. 25, no 2, p. 1-9Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this introduction, we reemphasize some key parts of meta-organization theory and their implications for understanding meta-organizations and meta-organizing processes. We clarify what meta-organizations are and what they are not and then analyze their key purposes and activities. We then present the papers of the special issue and discuss venues for future research. Although many key contributions have been made to meta-organization theory and research, there are many more things to investigate before we know as much about meta-organizations as we know about individual-based organizations. 

  • 44. Petersson, Jesper
    et al.
    Soneryd, Linda
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology, Stockholm Centre for Organizational Research (SCORE).
    Defend, Retreat and Attack: Urban Waters and Valuation Practices2022In: Water Alternatives, E-ISSN 1965-0175, Vol. 5, no 1, p. 175-192Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper explores the river landscapes and concomitant values resulting from tensions between floodmanagement and visions of a River City. The aim is to contribute to an understanding of the management of urbanwaters as valuation practices. We regard valuation practices as co-constitutive of current and future riverlandscapes. Sweden’s second-largest city, Gothenburg, is located next to the sea, and the Göta River, Sweden’slargest water system, runs through it. Our empirical focus is on how this city approaches increasing risks of flooding.We explore three approaches that have been formulated in relation to flood management: defend, retreat andattack. We ask how these approaches are applied in the management of Göta River flooding and in the city’s visionof a future Gothenburg that embraces the river as a genuinely positive aspect of urban life. We present the case asa journey that takes us upstream from the river’s sea inlet port and through Gothenburg. During our kilometre bykilometre journey, the river’s appearance shifts. The varied river landscape mirrors the diversity in how its watersare valuated, both historically and in present times. The perception of urban waters is shaped by practices ofvaluation. These valuations are generative. They connect the value of water to other entities, actors, plans, activitiesand buildings, and they are thus key to the river landscapes that will eventually be realised. By way of conclusion,we identify a number of governance challenges that are particularly relevant to urban rivers.

  • 45.
    Sundström, Göran
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Johannesson, Livia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Centre for Organizational Research (SCORE).
    Hur kontrollerades beslutsfattandet?2021In: Megaprojektet Nya Karolinska Solna: Beslutsprocesserna bakom en sjukvårdsreform / [ed] Maria Grafström; Martin Qvist; Göran Sundström, Göteborg; Stockholm: Makadam Förlag, 2021, p. 282-303Chapter in book (Other academic)
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  • 46.
    Maria, Grafström
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Centre for Organizational Research (SCORE).
    Qvist, Martin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Hur styrdes beslutsfattandet?2021In: Megaprojektet Nya Karolinska Solna: Beslutsprocesserna bakom en sjukvårdsreform / [ed] Maria Grafström; Martin Qvist; Göran Sundström, Göteborg; Stockholm: Makadam Förlag, 2021, p. 268-281Chapter in book (Other academic)
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  • 47.
    Maria, Grafström
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Centre for Organizational Research (SCORE).
    Qvist, Martin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Sundström, Göran
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Megaprojektet Nya Karolinska Solna2021In: Megaprojektet Nya Karolinska Solna: Beslutsprocesserna bakom en sjukvårdsreform / [ed] Maria Grafström, Martin Qvist, Göran Sundström, Göteborg: Makadam Förlag, 2021, p. 9-23Chapter in book (Other academic)
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  • 48.
    Ahrne, Göran
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Centre for Organizational Research (SCORE).
    The significance of social bonds2021In: Constructing social research objects: Constructuionism in research practice / [ed] Håkon Leiulfsrud; Peter Sohlberg, Leiden: Brill Nijhoff, 2021, p. 84-98Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 49.
    Johannesson, Livia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Centre for Organizational Research (SCORE).
    Inför lagen ska alla helst vara olika2021In: Svenska dagbladet, ISSN 1101-2412, p. 32-32Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 50.
    Andersson, Catrin
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Centre for Organizational Research (SCORE).
    Qvist, Martin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Idén om patienten i centrum2021In: Megaprojektet Nya Karolinska: Beslutsprocesserna bakom en sjukvårdsreform / [ed] Maria Grafström; Martin Qvist; Göran Sundström, Stockholm: Makadam Förlag, 2021, p. 118-132Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 51.
    Yngfalk, Carl
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Centre for Organizational Research (SCORE).
    Furusten, Staffan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Centre for Organizational Research (SCORE).
    Idén om offentlig-privat samverkan2021In: Megaprojektet Nya Karolinska Solna: Beslutsprocesserna bakom en sjukvårdsreform / [ed] Maria Grafström; Martin Qvist; Göran Sundström, Götegorg: Makadam Förlag, 2021, p. 150-166Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 52.
    Yngfalk, Carl
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Centre for Organizational Research (SCORE).
    Junker, Svenne
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Centre for Organizational Research (SCORE).
    Furusten, Staffan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Centre for Organizational Research (SCORE).
    Managementkonsulterna: tjänare eller härskare?2021In: Megaprojektet Nya Karolinska Solna: Beslutsprocesserna bakom en sjukvårdsreform / [ed] Maria Grafström,;Martin Qvist; Göran Sundström, Göteborg: Makadam Förlag, 2021, p. 229-243Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 53.
    Gustavsson, Martin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Centre for Organizational Research (SCORE).
    En konsthalls materiella förutsättningar: Om Baumols dilemma och organisatorisk glömska 1923–20202021In: Göteborgs Konsthall: en 100-årig konsthistoria / [ed] Andréas Hagström, Göteborg: Göteborgs konsthall , 2021, p. 217-256Chapter in book (Other academic)
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  • 54.
    Segnestam Larsson, Ola
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Centre for Organizational Research (SCORE). Ersta Sköndal Bräcke University College, Sweden.
    Alexius, Susanna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Centre for Organizational Research (SCORE).
    The Social Meaning of Money in Nonprofit Organizations: A Case Study of Formal and Informal Earmarking of Money2021In: Journal of Nonprofit Education and Leadership, ISSN 1046-6819, E-ISSN 2157-0604, Vol. 11, no 3, p. 1-19Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    By studying mechanisms, justifications, and valuations, this article analyzes the social meaning of earmarked money in a nonprofit organization. Focusing on the social meaning of money implies gaining insights into the moral underpinnings and justifications of the origin and generation of money as well as processes by which various streams of mo